Wow, what a complete load of crapola, Nintendo.

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by Wrote A Game or Two, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. Wrote A Game or Two

    Wrote A Game or Two
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    I guess this is more of a rant than anything, but I recently was given a Wii console as an early Christmas present so I was over on their site browsing around to see what kind of games I can get for it, and I see they have something called WiiWare which works I guess somewhat like XBLA and other "indie friendly" web based distribution models. I start thinking "Hey, wouldn't it be fun to write my own game for the Wii and maybe even sell it and make a little money?" So I google around a bit which leads me to Warioworld.com where you can apply to be a licensed Nintendo developer. It's there that I find out they will NOT license anyone who works out of their own home.

    Whiskey Tango Foxtrot?? WHAT A LOAD OF CRAP!

    Seriously, Nintendo. That's just total BS. There are a TON of indie developers out there who work out of their own home. Let's take the guys who wrote Super Meat Boy as an example - only one of the most successful indie console games ever written, by the way - who both worked out of their own homes and turned out a game that made a ton of money for Microsoft. Are you serious, Nintendo, are you guys so effin' big that you don't WANT to earn the potentially MILLIONS upon MILLIONS of dollars worth of revenue that a slew of home based indie developers can generate for you?

    No wonder there's a whole underground network of developers dedicated to hacking your stuff and making their own games - YOU'VE GIVEN THEM NO CHOICE!!!

    Pretty lame. Oh well, it's a nice toy I guess. It's just too bad you guys have decided to shoot yourselves in the foot and turned your back on a limitless supply of talented devs who could have made you guys a buttload of money. Your loss, Nintendo. Your loss.

    End of rant. Back to looking at games for this thing.
     
  2. igamedev

    igamedev
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    It's really no bid deal. You just piggy back off one of the established studios, they market your game, etc, etc. Lots of devs work out of the house doing wii games. (I was one of them.)
     
  3. Wrote A Game or Two

    Wrote A Game or Two
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    Sounds interesting, how do you get the devkit and other necessities? Any names you can share of the studios that offer this? I'm definitely interested, I spent the night last night playing games on it and I love the interface, it gave me lots of ideas that the Wii would be uniquely suited for.
     
  4. nsmadsen

    nsmadsen
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    Most indie developers I know seem to be moving more towards the mobile or social markets. The cost for getting in the door on mobile devices and social websites have been much lower and the gateway is much more accessible to many indie devs. Of course development on consoles has always been more expensive on all the platforms; it's a barrier put in place to ensure those who want to develop on current gen consoles have the resources, manpower and security needed to protect the hardware and brand. Think of it this way - to franchise a fast food joint you have to hold serious funds - for example McDonalds requires $750,000 worth. They do this because they want to filter out folks who haven't prepped or don't have all of the resources lined up. They're trying to ensure each franchise will have the best odds of success.

    There's nothing stopping you from deving on other platforms some of them completely free to you! But if you want to dev on a premiere brand, which Nintendo is surely one, you're gonna have to pay for that opportunity.

    Really? When I applied to become a certified developer for the Nintendo DS one of the mandatory clauses was that you cannot work (with a dev kit) out of your home or any other "shared" location. In other words Nintendo required that the dev kits be kept in a separate, secured location solely used for that business. Granted this was several years ago so perhaps they've changed their requirements?

    It's pretty easy to find out how to apply, but as I said before Nintendo is pretty picky and strict when it comes to approving. This website helps walk you through it: http://www.ehow.com/how_12054521_become-authorized-nintendo-developer.html

    Best of luck!
     
    #4 nsmadsen, Dec 14, 2012
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2012

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