Which is the best country to be an Indie game dev?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by Merx, Feb 17, 2010.

  1. cliffski

    Moderator Original Member

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    I bought a detached house in the country here in the UK for cash. That's from indie game development.

    I consider that a bright future.
     
  2. Indinera

    Moderator Indie Author

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    wow, Bulgaria here I come lol

    Seriously, indie-life in Bulgaria must be really cool.:D
     
  3. Game Producer

    Moderator Original Member

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    Come Finland, we have:
    - cold winters
    - warm saunas

    Nothing beats that.
     
  4. int13

    int13 New Member

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    one more vote for Bulgaria. The corporate tax is flat 10%. I will see the results in indie game sales in few months :)
     
  5. Karja

    Original Member

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    You can always come to Sweden. Apparently we're the best innovation-driven economy as of 2010. :)
    http://www.connectivityscorecard.org/countries/

    Nah, Sweden is really no good. High cost of living, high taxes, dark, cold and snowy, etc etc.
     
  6. kglarsen

    kglarsen New Member

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    Why is everyone talking about the climate? You're making games! If we were talking about selling skiing equipment, yes it's relevant, but on games.....

    If the weather was Caribbean-like no work would me made on the games - on the beach all day long, at least for me! :)
     
  7. Escapee

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    I was about to reply "oh tell that to Cliffski, Amaranth, Jack & many other great small indie game developers here ....." but NVM, Cliffski has already responded.

    I actually think it's much more complex than a professional career as you get to deal not only with programming aspect of the game, but also on marketing (Ie : website, advertisement, press release, and more), hiring (Ie : arts/music), etc.
     
  8. Indinera

    Moderator Indie Author

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    It's much more free and exciting. :D
     
  9. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

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    I could go in NZ and probably not work for 10 years and live with my "non professional" recurring income! (especially using that law of 4 years of no taxable income)
    Yes but unless you're crazy you want to go outside to get inspiration or to exercise yourself!
    If you need "motivation" to work on indie games then probably isn't the kind of business for you. I am currently living 10km from a big natural park (so during summer is wonderful) and 1h30m of car from some decent beaches (not the best, but fine) but I work anyway! :D
     
  10. Indinera

    Moderator Indie Author

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    I like in the Riviera and even at summer I like making my games lol

    What's the minimum salary (in USD) again there? :p
     
  11. Merx

    Indie Author

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    The climate/weather issue is probably because a few of us are British, where it has been less than 10 degrees C for the last 3 months.

    I know <10 is not that cold but you have to realise that the British weather specialises in cold and wet and it's the wet bit that really chills you.

    So thinking of somewhere with a nice climate/views where you can work from your balcony/veranda and not be wrapped up in the corner of your dining room huddled over a hot cup of coffee sounds good! :)

    As for the friends and family and moving away I am fortunate in the fact that being recently divorced I have managed to loose touch with most of my friends and my family have family of their own to keep them occupied!

    I also happen to be quite happy on my own, I enjoy good company when I find it, but I do enjoy just being me and casual/indie game development fits well with that.

    And what's wrong with looking for the indie/casual game developers idea of utopia...

    Low buisness tax
    Low cost of living ($ to local currency good)
    Nice climate/weather (lower fuel bills)
    Beatiful scenery
    Great broadband
    Freedom of speech... (keep the internet free and all that!)

    Being based in the UK does that mean that I can work anywhere in the EU as self employed?
     
  12. Spiegel

    Spiegel New Member

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    Im from Portugal...

    The minimum salary is around 450€ (now upgrading to 475€), you can win 1300€ to 2000€ with Java Programming from any Consulting Company you want. (more if you dig a bit)

    Housing in Lisbon and Porto is expensive (600€ upwards for a T1), outside of them is cheap ( a T1 can go for 300 euro per month, a room from 150€).
    Buying houses in the big cities is expensive, in the surrounding areas not so expensive.

    Internet connections is around 18 € for an ADSL connection with no limits.

    Taxes as a single Person company are 20% of your earnings if youre selling stuff. So for any 20$ you sell, you'll receive 14.7€ from coin exchange after that you pay 20% of all you profits to the state.

    If you have a job that already pays social security and has a work insurance, you do not have to pay any of those, if you are a full indie then you pay another 11% to social security.

    AAHHH... taxes in the big cities are higher than the sea shore places (beautiful ones) by the Alentejo coast (also known as Costa Vicentina), IRC is lower at those places. Very nice in the summer, very cold in the winter...

    Cost of living: I used to spend 70-100 to feed me alone (for a whole month) when I was single, Electricity/water/Gas is around 50-100 euro (all bundled) depending on usage.

    Restaurants start at 5€ per person, but normally it would go for 15 per person...

    Car gasoil is 1.099€ per liter, 0.6€ per GPL liter.

    The judicial system sucks... slow as hell...

    The health system is great if you're not looking for a small surgery(for those you can wait for years), and its free... those 11% of social security pay for it.

    Cars are expensive and transportation sucks...go for a bike (you can ride a 125cc with your car license and enter motorways as well, these cost 2000€ new less used) and loose all traffic jams, rent a room near your place of work, work at nigth in your games until youre full indie...

    Also we have around 8-9 months of good weather, 5 of great sunny weather. 3 months of excessive cold...

    People are cranky and not very civic... but we almost always welcome everyone like they were Portuguese.

    Politicians are crooked as hell, but its the norm, and most of the times the industry is short sighted... there is a lot of opportunities here if you play your cards right.

    The night in Lisbon is absolutely amazing and in the summer the country generally is great, near the beach is awesome.

    Girls are pretty nice to look at as well... very nice actually...

    Given that... Why the hell am I looking for jobs in Denmark and Norway?
     
    #32 Spiegel, Feb 18, 2010
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2010
  13. Game Producer

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    Simple - here in Finland we have so cold & long winter that you gotta stay indoors for most of the time. :D
     
  14. michalczyk

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    Very true! I know it from personal experience. I lived in 4 countries around the world and every time you move to a new country there is so much stuff that needs to get done. Not just the required paper work like local driving license, insurance, etc. but stuff like: so where do I buy food? What does a supermarket look like in this country, what is it called? Is this an expensive one or a cheap one? How does public transportation work? Also if you move to US from Europe your electrical appliances won't work, so you'll have to buy new ones... etc. So the first few months (of one's spare time) are used on exploring such mundane matters and spending money on stuff.
     
  15. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

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  16. Spore Man

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    Oh for crying out loud. I'm from Canada and I have never seen a grizzly bear except at the zoo. :mad:

    Do you like living next to the sea, and small town life? There's a province here called Prince Edward Island (yes it's an island) and they have huge generous subsidies for tech companies and game dev companies to set up shop there. You'll live like a king compared to the locals. All you gotta do is hire an employee or two. It'll be sweet!*

    (I have never even BEEN to PEI. I just read up on their subsidies. ;) )
     
  17. Qitsune

    Qitsune New Member

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    Info on PEI
    http://www.gov.pe.ca/index.php3?number=81114&lang=E
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Edward_Island
    But afaik there isn't much there aside from potatoes, Anne of Green Gables and a Long Tail studio (I mean, they even list the 7 hospitals in the Province on the wikipedia page, that scares me.) If the weather in winter is anything like New Briunswick which isright next to it, they get crazy snowstorms in the winter.

    Vancouver is a popular place that doesn't get much snow and is close to the Rockies, but that popularity also makes it one of the most expensive places in Canada.

    FYI I have met people who think that people in Quebec (place like Quebec City or Montreal) speak french like people in New Orleans speak french (that is, they don't but they send their kids to immersion school ) so they came here and were shocked. So yes, it helps a lot of you speak french, except in Montreal where anglos can get by. But the signs are all in french so you better get up to speed if you want to avoid parking tickets etc. Cost of living is cheaper than Toronto or Vancouver however.
     
  18. PoV

    PoV
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    I grew up in a town not far from Vancouver (Squamish). School would sometimes get canceled because of a grizzly roaming the forest. We'd also often catch bears hanging out in bins at the dump. ;)

    But yeah, big deal. Depending where you are in the world, any place with heavy forestry has it's animals. If you were in California, you might have Cougars. If you were in Australia, you might have Crocodiles. It's called the outdoors. If you don't like that, live in a City.
     
  19. Moose2000

    Moose2000 New Member

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    New Zealand has flightless birds. If you're not careful they can give you a vicious running away.
     
  20. PoV

    PoV
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    That could be a problem if you're afraid of isolation or being alone.
     

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