Which is better? Software engineer or pizza delivery boy?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by mamashop, Sep 2, 2006.

  1. mamashop

    Original Member

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    Based on experience, working on one's own casual game while holding a full time job is an exhaustive experience. This is especially bad if one is a full time programmer earning good money in a large corporation, as when one is back home, the brain seems dead n malfunctioning after extensive hours of work, and progress on one's game seems dead slow, like 5 lines of code per hr? just kidding.

    So i would like to know, would it be better to get a job as a pizza delivery boy or some work that doesnt taxes the brain cells too much, earning less just to survive, but maybe having a better mental condition to work on one's game? Would you feel embarassed if one day you meet up with former colleagues whom you happen to deliver pizza to? seriously interested to know how you guys feel...
     
  2. Dingo Games

    Indie Author

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    Well, a software engineer will make five times more money than a pizza delivery boy. So the best option might be to work full time as a software engineer saving up your money. Then once you have enough money to live off of, quit the software engineering job and do your games...

    That seems a lot better use of one's time. You could make more in a few months doing programming work than you could in a whole year doing pizza delivery.

     
  3. mamashop

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    Actually this is what i did, but now that i've ran out of resources again, i'm afraid i'll run into a vicious cycle - full time work, quit then indie work, back to full time work again, quit n more indie work... i'm trying to find an ideal situation where time and resources are capitalized.
     
  4. HalfLucifer

    HalfLucifer New Member

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    Hi mamashop,

    If I were you, I'd pick up one 'lightweight' software engineering work.
    I'm so familiar with the feeling that you ran out of brain cells during day work so that self-motivation project is hard to progress at all.
    I'd prefer to work with smart and efficient people in my day job to make a living before I can be a fulltime indie.
    Work effectively and efficiently is my prime discipline.
    I believe somewhere in software industry there're some jobs you don't need to burn your entire life on it and overwork a lot.

    Keep your energy accompanying with your passionate. :)
     
  5. val

    val
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    Get software engineering job, and hire developers and graphic artists from Elbonia. You still have a chance to realize yourself as game designer/producer.

    This will save you a lot of time, and you relatives will not think that you are crazy..
     
  6. Omega

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    Why not, instead of worrying about that, just get the game done. There's no point discussing the negatives if your goal is to do the positive. I mean, for most people, they are already have enough negative influences from almost anybody who they talk to about casual games, so why bring that to the actual people who want to focus and discuss the positives? Sure you could post about hundreds of failures but what's the point? If you feel you need to make a game, then make it, then ask for advice on how to improve it. I mean it's your life, you don't have to worry about other people's past mistakes. Plus remember that the grass is always greener on the other side.

    Are you trying to make games or trying to 'score reps' with the community by posting this stuff? Why does it matter? Are you trying to become a journalist? No? Then why talk talk talk. Why not do do do.

    Why try to create a 'group-think' of 'making games is unrewarding and unrealistic'? If you say something negative, people will agree with you. If you say something positive, people will agree with you. So why not just say something positive? No matter what you do, there will be people saying you can or can't do something no matter how bad or good you really are. By asking this question, all the people who want to focus on making software for consumers are going to skip it, so of course all the replies will agree with you, and you will feel satisfied that yes, you are being ripped off if you make games for other people. Or, you could post that "Man this is so much fun! This is truly rewarding and I love the positives of allowing my software to reach anybody in the world!" in which case most negative people will avoid the thread and attract people who feel that way as well (the people you want to learn from) and you will get a positive response. If you want to succeed, you want to focus on what you can control, not what you can't.
     
    #6 Omega, Sep 2, 2006
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2006
  7. michalczyk

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    That is exactly what I started doing not too long ago, and for the same reasons you mentioned. I now work 2 hours daily six times a week (+ twice monthly on Sundays) at the local supermarket. This small job covers all my living costs (I'm single, no car, small apartment, etc). The great thing about it is that I can now fully concentrate on my own work and have plenty of time for it.
     
    #7 michalczyk, Sep 3, 2006
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2006
  8. Nexic

    Indie Author

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    That covers all your living costs? *moves to denmark*
     
  9. Infinite_Reflection

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    I work as a night auditor at a hotel. I'm all alone and I've got about 6 hours every shift to do whatever I want. Sure, I've got to answer the occasional phone call, but, even still - the job is sweet. Well, except for the pay, that is. ;)
     
  10. Devman

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    I'm a full-time software engineer working on my own indie game, and what works for me is to wake up a few hours early on 2 to 4 mornings during the week before work to program on my indie game.

    My mind is sharper in the morning usually and that is when I have the most energy, while in the evening after a long day of software work, my mind and body are tired, so I never feel like working on my game.

    Thus, when I feel freshest in the morning, I am devoting that time to working on my game, making steady progress each week. I estimate it will take me 2 years to finish my first game, but it's worth it!

    Good luck to you--if I did pizza delivery, I would feel more stress due to not having much money and worrying about making bill payments.
     
  11. michalczyk

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    Yep, my hourly wage is nearly $20 US (the minimal hourly wage is about $17,5 US) and I have a very simple job. But, I should mention that my costs of living are really low - I optimized them enormously since I started my own company two years ago. It's amaizing how much money one can save (and thus work less for others and more for yourself) by making some simple adjustments in life. I'm kind of a frugal person now, and I really like it that way too.
     
    #11 michalczyk, Sep 4, 2006
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2006

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