Which is better: Publishing more or Promoting more?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by Schweinryder, Dec 15, 2016.

?
  1. Publishing more

    6 vote(s)
    40.0%
  2. Promoting more

    9 vote(s)
    60.0%
  1. noahbwilson

    Indie Author

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    Your personal experiences don't make it fact.

    You're basically saying "hey, maybe you'll get lucky like these random examples!"

    Come back when you've actually made a game before tossing out advice.
     
  2. pookey

    pookey New Member

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    I never stated that I was the all and knowing my dude, I guess someone can't express... My bad? I don't think I was or am behind the marketing team for any of the listed indie games so, no it's not really a personal experience because if you have played any of these games or at least heard of them I think you'd know these are not opinions but in fact just a fact that these games rose to power before any funded advertisement. It was all the people's push.

    Unless you saw any advertisements for these games before there rise or have a good reply as to what else, than it stands as it stands and your comment is an empty whiplash. You don't need to be an Indie dev or in the inside of anything to see how something became successful and how. I appreciate your input before, but don't think because you've made a few games and put them up means you get to silence somebody on areas and act elitist. I've seen one or two vidya games before in my life and I've played a few so from a user and costumer who are what video games are directed to, I can put my own input as what is appealing to me and what maybe to others, the users. Last I checked you don't need a permit of making a few games in Gamemaker just to say that you should make things YOU like and that people will be more likely to like something they've discovered because of something being made with care and passion, with favorable word of mouth and or reviews. Which, that has worked with the titles that I have listed compared that of cheap annoying advertisement. I never told anyone how to structurally make a game, marketing=/game design so your comment just seems childish, unnecessary and silly to me. Sorry but I'll speak how I like officer, sir.


    I just wanted to add my cent... I never said I was the one to listen to, I'm among other users here, but you don't seem like a diplomatic person or a ''Generally decent'' guy. Not trying to be rude. This will be my last post and viewership.

    Good luck on Retroknight, I'll be happy to try it out and also good luck to the OP's games, I hope to see your games somewhere soon! :)
     
  3. noahbwilson

    Indie Author

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    Really dude?

    You're right. You're not trying to be rude. You just are being rude now.
     
  4. Schweinryder

    Schweinryder New Member

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    The way I see it is in order for your mobile game to be successful, you have to be lucky. Unless you can spend huge money on advertising you have to get lucky.

    You can increase your chances of getting lucky by publishing more games, and making a fun game doesn't have to take a long time. Look at Flappy Bird, it took him a week or something to make. Look at the top entries of any Ludum Dare, there are some really great games there, all made from scratch within 48 hours. Quality over quantity every time, but they aren't mutually exclusive.

    Now in my case, I didn't even stick to the plan for a week. I don't really want to make small mobile games, so it wasn't fun for me to work like that.
     
  5. noahbwilson

    Indie Author

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    Agreed. I started making small games and figured they'd stick, and yeah some get some play now and again, but its not as enjoyable for me to make. Now I'm going bigger with my Action/RPG. It's taking forever, but its a hell of a lot of fun to make at least.
     
  6. pookey

    pookey New Member

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    Right.... and you edited your comment, pretty deceptive. Read back on the quote you made, of course though that's why you changed it, isn't it...? You sought to make my words seem useless and you tried to silence me while not even giving examples back, while, I wished you good luck and fortune and pointed the irony of calling yourself a generally ''decent person''. It was out of the fact that you were not being that, not to get back at you just as a heads up. Because, you were trying to silence and push someone out of a discussion and not being overly all productive. '' generally decent'' That's something you labeled on yourself, not me. If you are truly are, why are you getting so hung up about it from someone? You made a snarky and pin pointy comment because you felt you had better advice. Which is fine, I don't disagree with you and I never said I was right. I'm just trying to freely have an opinion here.

    Anyway, all I meant to say was that these aren't random examples of people hitting lottery and I think that is not being realized here. none of the games I listed are by all bad games or the best... They have unique ideas to them, all of them, and there's more of them out there than those I listed that I can add, so random? No. that's my point. You want someone to play your games? Give them a interest and reason to! And also Angry Birds was mechanically the first on smart phones to play the way it did at the time, so that only adds onto my list, whoa random.

    People get eventually bored of anything but they need that ticket of a reason to lunge in first. People are looking for new experiences. Whether advertisements or none, if people don't like what they see than they're not interested, simple. It doesn't take an indie dev to realize basic marketing of if you're selling a basic sub par thing that is similar to a huge portion of the market and your main focus is on advertising, that won't get you anywhere and you'll reach a peak, because people already have it. A hundred or even thousand downloads won't even be close, a hundred, maybe, if you hit good search engine name. But, apart from that that's exactly what has happened here and what happens to a lot of others.

    It doesn't have to be mind blowing or the best or even good, but if you're happy to just blind shoot out games that are similar already to others to appeal to other peoples taste and you're wondering why? It's worth a change to make something a little more interesting, no? That was only my original point. That's great to hear you want to create something great and not out the door!

    I have to respectfully disagree with ''luck'' though. People don't assert themselves to things or like things because of ''luck'' and even in the way of getting your game out there, no... At least I don't think so. I think if you focus on an idea that is unique to you and not focused towards everyone else and is executed honestly and not cheaply to what you had in mind, to me I think that'd do well.

    Name me a small simple mobile game without tripping over yourself that has gained it's success solely based on paid ads. That isn't a franchise name, a spin off\sequel or a copycat leech type where it's also been thrown money at it. I can only find small simple made games, if i wanted to, with similar names to other titles or just common simple names.

    I'm here to give out my thoughts to the OP, not you. I just thought a fresh set of none indie dev eyes wouldn't be a problem and see it from a consumer point and I was wrong. He can disregard all of what I've said or tell me to go which I intend to do anyway, but this isn't your parlay. Let speakers speak, disagree and give me examples not verbal shutdowns.

    Also best luck with your game Mr. OP and your action/rpg sounds exciting, again i'd still be happy to play it. Adio
     
    #26 pookey, Aug 14, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2017
  7. noahbwilson

    Indie Author

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    Boom Beach, Clash of Clans, any other version of Angry Birds, any game that has the word "Saga" or "Candy" or "Crush" in it... cuz those games are shit. Or you could cheat like "Flappy Bird" and fake your downloads.

    There are millions of people out there that will play "whatever is popular" and popularity can be faked with ads. Buying fake reviews. Buying fake downloads. If you honestly think the Apps that are on the front page of the Apple App store are popular because of 'word of mouth', you're incredibly gullible.

    Please stop ranting. No one cares. You seriously have no idea what you are talking about.

    PS: I edited this just to write this PS.
     
  8. noahbwilson

    Indie Author

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    The bottom line is this buddy: You're offering some terrible advice with zero experience.

    I run an entire website devoted to people submitting their games for advertising, and no, I do not charge them a dime. I see a lot of games come and go, some people put their heart and soul into their games and believe it is great, and I've played most of them, and yes: some of them are great. Some of them are shit. The world doesn't care about how hard you try or how much effort you put into it, and that's gone on for ages in the video game industry.

    Heavy Barrel was a NES game that was amazing. I love the hell out of that game. They never made another one because it just wasn't that popular. The fact that the game was great had really no effect on its popularity.

    Then you take a company like King who makes Candy Crush and Bubble Witch Saga. Those games are shit. They are basic, simple, and use fancy graphics to entice stay-at-home moms. No one put their heart and soul into these games. No one said "I think Bubble Witch Saga 2 will be the best game ever made." Nope. They are factory games cranked out by the masses to generate profit, and the profits from their previous games fuel ads. Their ads are everywhere, and gullible people follow those ads. Gullible people fuel downloads, downloads fuel popularity charts, and the cycle continues.

    This is not just how it works for video games: this is the model for EVERYTHING. TV, Movies, Music, pretty much anything creative now-a-days. This is the way it is now, so if you don't like making games (or have never even tried) and think you're going to get rich as long as you "try really hard"... you're in the wrong place.
     
  9. noahbwilson

    Indie Author

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  10. BlueIshDan

    BlueIshDan New Member

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    I'm honestly really bad for not reading entire threads, but from my personal and professional experience and opinion, it's pretty much a 50/50 kinda thing.

    You want to gain momentum over your time spent. Start with picking a game style, or a trend if you want to get that taste of downloads right away, then build a cross-project friendly framework to support that style of game. With that, the hard work is really done and the rest of your time is spent on production and your development time gets freed up and time management gets a lot less stressful and more rewarding for that time spent. Which by your speed it sounds you have no problem with this haha! :D

    From there making your promotion/production decisions should really fall into your study of the general users and competitors of that game style you picked. Also your knowledge of this age of context they say we live in today and having an awareness of the accessibility/social options and trends that people are currently fond of is a very important thing. Keeping them up to date is a practice of keeping the momentum you obtained in the first place.

    Once you have a good thing going, try and find the Social Kings and Queens of that style of trend and try to get them into a mentioning partnership. This is probably the quickest way to get yourself directly to your intended users that keep coming back.

    All I know haha, hope this perspective helps!

    Also, I am impressed by your drive if you're pumping out a game a week! Know that taking time in-between working to gain a perspective on your current position and direction compared to what you planned/hoped for is just as important! You deserve the reward of allowing yourself a nice long break from the grind! You'll probably roll right into that perfect project idea to stir up by the sounds of how amped up to go you are haha :p

    Cheers!
     
  11. ShadowRider320

    ShadowRider320 New Member

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    I think promoting is more important. However, it doesn't have to be paid. For example, share your game in as many platforms as possible. Do an Instagram page, Tumblr, (free) website, etc. Most indie games I've played have been simply because I so happen to come across them, like it, and play it. Not because they had 50 others released. I don't think it's a main factor, especially as I've seen many "first time" projects become very successful. Of course, even if it takes a while for your first project to pick up, doesn't mean you should only spend all your time on it and trying to get it out there.

    Start working on your next project if that's what you want, while giving your current one some TLC. Some people do KickStarters and often times I think they're good more so for the exposure than for the actual funds. But start promoting it and creating pages for it as soon as you start the project, don't wait until it's done or almost done. Create a following, make people want to wait for it and be updated on progress and stuff. If you already have a plot and concept art, bam! That's already enough grounds for promotion, show them the characters, make them love them and curious about the story. If people follow your project from the beginning, it gives it a bigger window to spread its name before its release.
     
  12. undomi

    undomi New Member

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    i had a brainstorm that perhaps one way to advertise would be to deliberately incorporate other people's games into your own via ingame mention, with their permission and a reciprocal advert, review or link from their site to yours. similar in concept to the old website rings. it can be integrated into your game in any number of ways. if it's a game with a puzzle story, you could send people to their website to find an answer to a question in your game, for example. if it's futuristic, you could have a flashing sign with the name of their game on it. a "you scratch my back, i scratch yours". sticking to gaming sites might slow progress but it's your target audience and that can't be bad.
     
    #32 undomi, Sep 18, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2017
  13. zizulot

    zizulot New Member

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    Im new in programming myself, but my ideology is to make FUN , ATTRACTIVE , WITH ALOT OF REPLAY VALUE game, Im in the works now , my goal is Quality over Quantity, Will try get some reviews from Youtubers and Bloggers , I did released couple of games on GameJolt Hovewer I got like 63 views , 8 downloads and 9 follows , games was made only by learning purposes if you want you can check them out on - https://gamejolt.com/@zizulot , nothing special really, I didnt expect anything special either, Hovewer when I release my "SLOGY" game I will give you my feedback, If it will be sucessfull I will share my tactics with you.
     

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