Which is better? Developer or portal/publisher?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by mamashop, Aug 29, 2006.

  1. mamashop

    Original Member

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    Hi,

    would like to know your views on whether it's better to work one's business up from developer, with all the blood, sweat and tears, to being a portal/publisher, where most of the revenue are? The reason i asked is that it takes a long time to develop a casual game (maybe 3 to 10 mths), but portals like big fish publishes a game every day! And the mere pittance that developers get at end of day? ...peanuts to survive another development cycle?

    regds
    mamashop
     
  2. Jamie W

    Original Member Indie Author

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    I don't think most game developers are in it for the money. Well, certainly not just for the money (and if they are, they'd perhaps do better applying themselves elsewhere).

    There's a lot to be said for doing what you love, following your heart, and sticking to it no matter how hard things get. Things will come good in the end (but don't quote me on that ok!).
     
  3. dxgame

    Original Member

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    "I don't think most game developers are in it for the money."

    I think the most successful developers.......are. ;)
     
  4. Genimo

    Indie Author

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    I'm doing both at this moment, finishing up our first game and attempting to build a portal, and from my very limited experience it was much easier for us to finish a game then to build a traffic to our portal...
     
  5. electronicStar

    Original Member

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    To answer the first question: it's always easier to be an art dealer than an artist.
    The art dealers get the money and the artists get the glory and the personal reward of practicing of their art.
    You decide :D
     
  6. arcadetown

    Moderator Original Member

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    There's a lot of guys that develop casual games yet only a handful that make good cash. Meanwhile there's a lot of guys that create portals yet only a handful that make good cash. From my observations both routes seem feast or famine and relatively similar cash potential for mid to upper players.
     
  7. Davaris

    Original Member

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    This is just an idea so take it with a grain of salt:

    Make a game and attempt to sell it yourself. If it goes poorly offer it to the portals so they can help build your profile. If it goes well sell it exclusively from your site so it builds your site's profile and you get maximum profit. Then when the sales begin to drop off, offer it to the portals so they can build your profile.

    You can use them as much as they use you.
     
  8. Drake

    Indie Author

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    "Life is short, do what you love."

    Of course, the only way to know for sure whether it's better to be a developer or a portal owner, is to get one of each and have them fight to the death. Maybe a good event for the next Casuality? I nominate cliffski for our team. :D
     
  9. cliffski

    Moderator Original Member

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    Be warned, I'm heavily armed. I collect weapons. And I can kill an orc at 50ft with my bow*


    *providing my posture is correct and you give me 10 minutes to string my bow.
     
  10. Coyote

    Indie Author

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    From my experience (which is limited - I'm definitely not in the "mid tiers" yet as a affiliate or a developer), BOTH routes are filled with blood, sweat, and tears. And profit - at least so they keep telling me. Sometimes it's more profitable to do the one, sometimes it's better to do the other.

    Building up (and maintaining) a customer base AND a product line (the easy part) as a portal is about like crawling naked on your stomache through a field of broken glass with no end in sight. It is not just about putting up a website and letting the money come in. It just doesn't work that way. Or if it does, nobody informed ME of how to do it.

    Creating a game at least gives you the opportunity to create a competitive advantage (you are the sole producer of THAT GAME). Owning the I.P. for your game means you own the right to let other people make money for you. That's an awesome opportunity if you create something of real value and can leverage it properly. And at least when creating the game, there is an end to the field of broken glass you have to crawl through.
     

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