what to expect of windows phone 7 app sales?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by meds, Nov 22, 2010.

  1. meds

    meds New Member

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    I am nearing the release of my first mobile title, it is targeted to windows phone 7. I was just wondering about two things: how is the wp7 app market for sales? Obviously the user base is small but so is the number of apps which makes me think it might not be so bad?

    My other question is advertising. How sbould I go about advertising my game? It seems wrong to just spam it on forums... But at the same time I don't know how else to vet it exposure. My past two games have been pc only a d they both felt easier to advertise . I suppose my real fear is that i don't quite understand the target market.. :eek:
     
  2. hippocoder

    Indie Author

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    Early adopters either make a killing or nothing. Is there any risk involved for you? if not, do it.

    If you don't have competition you don't need much advertising.
     
  3. schizoslayer

    schizoslayer New Member

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    I wouldn't expect much at the moment as the uptake of WP7 phones has been very slow.

    However!

    So far the only games that seem to be selling on it at the Xbox Live Arcade games and this is largely because MS only puts their weight behind those titles. There is a good reason for this though: Everything else sucks.

    I've not encountered a good game on the phone yet. My advice is to have a really good icon (seriously this plays a huge part in my decision to even click through to your games description) and then to offer a decent trial version and to really push the production values. I'm not looking for an innovative gaming experience on my phone I just want something that is well made, not buggy and has audio (very few have good audio and it make a huge difference).

    I don't go anywhere for reviews of games on phones so I can't advise you on how to advertise it. But I suspect that most of the people with the phone do as I do: browse the marketplace for new stuff and click through to the games with a good icon and then try the ones with polished looking screenshots.

    I will pay upto £4 for a polished game that has a lot of replay value so don't feel like you have to compete on price. If I see a game for sale at 79p then I automatically classify it as junk and not worth looking at.
     
  4. meds

    meds New Member

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    I'm afraid I have to agree, almost all the none xbox live titles are basically prototype programmer art using 'games'. There are may be 10 exceptions to this rule.

    I totally agree with you on the early adopters part. In terms of competition, I think it's more a case of quality vs. quantity. The quantity of competition is great, the quality not so much. I think 9/10 games released on the app store did not have a proper artist working on it so yeah... I'm thinking maybe I do need some form of advertising so as not to be overwhelmed by all the poorer quality games. I mean my game will stay on the 'new' list for only so long before it ends up too far down for anyone to notice it. The idea I'd imagine is to have it on the new list then get it enough sales to put it on the top list...

    Haha I sincerely hope most Windows Phone 7 users have this attitude because my game isn't particularly innovative but I like to think the sound fx, art technical implementation are strong. I have loading screens, I support state resuming (so if you minimize the game and come back to it you can start where you left off) and all that.

    My art is done by an artist, my sound by a soundist (*artist) and programming by me. I guess I can call myself a programmer since that was my last day job :eek: I really hope that at least because of these small merits I'm placed above most of the competition in terms of the quality of my game.

    Also I agree on the price front, games at the lowest price point are seldom any good. I'm going to try and price mine around $3 to $4. As for replay value I'm not sure how much that will satisfy end users. It's basically an arcade game which gets more difficult by increasing the gameplay speed. When you start a new game you can start at 1/2 of your top score so hopefully that's motivation enough to get people to keep playing.
     
  5. schizoslayer

    schizoslayer New Member

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    Score attack games offer the most replay value I find. Especially on a 30 second format like a phone.

    Some general things: Make sure that once you die/lose you can get straight back into the game with just one button push and there are no long intros or anything. It can be very frustrating if you're in the zone to have to go back out to a menu and navigate your way back into the game.

    Same goes for a quickplay as soon as it starts up. If I can just tap a button once when it's loaded and be playing straight away I'm happy.

    I don't know if you can use the Live leaderboards stuff as an indie game but that also adds alot of value.
     
  6. meds

    meds New Member

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    That's a very good suggestion actually. I was meaning to implement it then thought that no one would actually want to use it. But since you bring it up I suppose at least one person would :p

    Achievements and all that are locked off to me. It's kind of frustrating. I'd make my own achievement system if I had the time and resources, then I'd license it to all my fellow none-xbox live indies then we'd take down Microsoft :p
     
  7. Snooker

    Original Member

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    No, you have to be a Microsoft-published title to gain access to Live connectivity and the managed store.
     

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