What are the problems faced by Indies?

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by FreakoutGames, Oct 16, 2017.

  1. FreakoutGames

    FreakoutGames New Member

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    Hello Indies,
    As a part of our research to understand the growing difficulties faced by indies we are trying to conduct a survey to know it better from the community itself.

    So according to you what is the biggest challenge for the indies, is it:
    • Finding a Team

    • How to market the game

    • Finding potential ways to generate revenue stream

    • Other factors (please specify)

    The more input and suggestion we can get, it would be really helpful :)


    Thanks
     
    Lance Von Alden likes this.
  2. Scoper

    Indie Author

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    Marketing the game is probably the hardest part. With the huge multitude of games, products, companies and people all competing for attention, it is very hard to get noticed. Simply spending money on advertising does nothing on its own. Building a loyal fanbase takes a lot of work and is impossible if the potential fans don't even know that the game exists in the first place.

    Finding the funding for production is also a major obstacle. You need to have something very impressive to show before anyone will even bother to look at it.

    Finding a team, I would say, is the easy part. There are lots of talented people out there if you have the money to hire them.

    And, perhaps obviously, a big obstacle is the production itself. There are hundreds of things that can go wrong during production and cause the final product to fail or never be completed.
     
  3. FreakoutGames

    FreakoutGames New Member

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    Thanks @Scoper - Getting discovered in mobile market is a huge challenge but still we can see games from not so big studios getting millions of download. There is no denying that the quality of product has to be really good to compete.

    There must be some user acquisition strategy which gets them the initial download boost, to maintain steady daily downloads.

    Staying motivated to get the product completed is also very important.
     
  4. TheTodd

    TheTodd New Member

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    I agree that marketing is VERY important, cause if you don't market your stuff, what's the point of releasing it?

    However, I do think that finding a team is hard, because while you can FIND teammates, it doesn't mean they'll stick around through highs and lows. Finding a team that'll be with you through thick and thin can be quite a challenge.
     
  5. FreakoutGames

    FreakoutGames New Member

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    Absolutely @TheTodd I agree, finding good team members who have the same attitude and patience to stick together is a challenge. I feel since there is no pay cycle in most collaborative work, it makes it difficult for people to stick together even if the concept is good.
     
  6. Lance Von Alden

    Lance Von Alden New Member

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    I think the hardest part might be Overall Compatibility: You need everything to work together up to a certain level. I am not only talking about coding or art or teams. I am talking about marketing, funding, time, development, management, etc. You can have the perfect marketing/funding stage, you got a lot of money (from kickstarter for example), but if you don't finish the game or find too many production failures, or even deliver a game way under the user expectations, everything goes wrong. You not only need one thing to work good on game development, you need everything to work, not perfectly, but as I said up to a certain proportional level, every stage, every section, everything must sync somehow or it might all fall apart. I have seen games dropped down by a simple glitch on the music or a glitch in the user interface, which are all small details, yet can cause player discomfort.
     
  7. TheTodd

    TheTodd New Member

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    It's a trial for sure, and only the worthy (for lack of a better term) make it through. It's not for everyone, but the rewards can be great if you make it through.
     
    Lance Von Alden likes this.
  8. Lord of Shadows

    Lord of Shadows New Member

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    I don't plan to be a full-on Indie, per say... I plan on making a full on company, similar to Treyarch, or even more specifically, Sony.

    Fact is, I don't have the ability to gain all the skills necessary to bring my vision to life, so the hardest part is finding the people who are willing to put enough work into it before they get paid. I mean, seriously... I need a full game programmed, fleshed out in story, developed, and made aesthetically perfect... I don't want to sacrifice graphics for story depth, and I don't want to sacrifice story depth for graphics, so since you can make something fast and well, but not cheap, or fast and cheap, but not well, or cheap and well, but not fast... it looks like I'm going for cheap and well, but slow.

    Patience is honestly the hardest part, for me.
     
  9. FreakoutGames

    FreakoutGames New Member

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    @Lance Von Alden and @TheTodd Yeah, the development process is really very challenging where every aspect have to be handled properly. We did a survey in Twitter to find out more about it and many indies find marketing and getting a good team as a big challenge.


    Working full time as indie can be very tough for sure :)
     

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