Visual Novel Project

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by SabinX, May 5, 2008.

  1. SabinX

    SabinX New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi! My name is Cristian and Im about to finish my career as a programmer.
    Ive been learning game development for myself for 2 years, first with managed directX, and later with xna.

    I wanna know how much can I earn by selling a videogame by internet, because I think that I could earn much money, because I think Its cheaper here in chile to pay a graphic artist, and its cheap living here.

    So, in order to know how much I can earn, I wanna develop a Visual Novel game, because I think that it is a easy to develop videogame, and it would be fast, so Im thinking of paying a graphics artist and start to develop the videogame.

    What do you think about it?

    Do you think I can earn money selling a Visual Novel game by internet?

    Or should I change the style of videogame?
     
  2. Christian

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2005
    Messages:
    769
    Likes Received:
    0
    Check if there are any government programm for funding video game business first, you may have nice oportunities there.

    There are visual novels for sale right now so, its a posibility, sure you can earn money with it, it all depends on how good your product is. Try to do a research on the types of visual novels around for sale so you can see whos your competition and the level of quality they manage.

    Have you ever made that kind of game?, it may take longer that what you think, have you ever made a game?, i think you may have, but its allways better to make sure so you have the right knowledge of how to make a good game.

    Good luck, i wish you all the best (yo tambien soy Chileno, pero vivo en Argentina :) ).
     
  3. JoshuaSmyth

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2004
    Messages:
    145
    Likes Received:
    0
    If by visual novel you mean "casual adventure game" then I think there is a huge demand for such titles. Check out how well the adventure games are doing on BigFishGames - particularly the Nancy Drew series, but there are others not based on existing licenses.
     
  4. defanual

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    Messages:
    612
    Likes Received:
    0
    A quick search in google for 'visual novels' brought up a game engine for making visual novels called blade engine: http://www.bladeengine.com/BladeEngine/whatis.php as well as a publishing/distribution service for such games suggesting they've sold 7 million of em' here: http://www.curiousfactory.com/distribution/dlsite_distribution.php

    Other then that (assuming that's even what your talking about) I have no clue, but it seems something that's a little specialized or perhaps niche unless your from japan or something, but I could be completely wrong:eek:

    Anywho, welcome to the fold and good wishes for your potential game development future:D
     
  5. defanual

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    Messages:
    612
    Likes Received:
    0
    Oh, found this on wikipedia, looks like according to this my instincts were right the first time. Here's a quote:
    Full article:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_novel

    Looks like you may have to cater it to the Japanese market (ie manga style) or take advantage of the fact that the market isn't crowded outside japan, that the usual style is manga and perhaps offer a new take and in doing so maybe create a new western/european market reaping all the benefits and thus creating the next game business akin to the casual model!

    Boy, I sound like Seth Godin, but from that perspective the potential even interests me ;)

    Thank God for google huh:D
     
  6. papillon

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    2,193
    Likes Received:
    0
    No no no no no. Stay away from the Blade engine. It has fewer features than all of its rivals. It just spent more on advertising (ie, 'anything at all'). If you're just starting out, you want Ren'Py. It's free, it's cross-platform, and it has a decent-sized community of very helpful people. http://renai.us/forums

    Also, CuriousFactory/DLsite is not much use to you unless you're trying to make and sell hentai. They do carry non-hentai, but if you look at the sales figures you'll see that a non-japanese non-hentai product is lucky to get a single sale on there.

    Can you make money selling VNs? Well, I *am*, so yes. But make sure you target your market carefully. There are a lot of fans out there who are not interested in anything if it wasn't originally made in Japan. Also, be aware that the other key part of the visual novel is the NOVEL.

    1. Novels take a long time to write.
    2. They require good language skills.

    Obviously you're generally not spending a huge amount of effort making sure the text of your forum postings is mellifluous, so your post here may not indicate your actual language level, but if your English is not perfect you will face much more difficulty with a VN than you would with a traditional casual game. Unless you hire someone to write the game as well as someone to draw the art...
     
  7. SabinX

    SabinX New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    A lot of thanks for all your advices =)

    I like the idea of developing english/spanish visual novel games and paying a graphic artist to draw me the characters and the backgrounds.

    I dont wanna use other engine, because Im already developing my own engine, cause I wanna add some original features to the videogame to make it funnier.

    Well... Im gonna work harder in the project and contact a graphic artist to draw me the pics =P

    I will try to post more in this forum to know the way you live and ask more advices in the future =)

    Bye!
     

Share This Page

  • About Indie Gamer

    When the original Dexterity Forums closed in 2004, Indie Gamer was born and a diverse community has grown out of a passion for creating great games. Here you will find over 10 years of in-depth discussion on game design, the business of game development, and marketing/sales. Indie Gamer also provides a friendly place to meet up with other Developers, Artists, Composers and Writers.
  • Buy us a beer!

    Indie Gamer is delicately held together by a single poor bastard who thankfully gets help from various community volunteers. If you frequent this site or have found value in something you've learned here, help keep the site running by donating a few dollars (for beer of course)!

    Sure, I'll Buy You a Beer