Tips for Multi-Title Development?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by Chris Evans, Feb 14, 2006.

  1. berserker

    Indie Author

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    The great incorporation of casual games industry has begun! You have to grow in order to survive long term :rolleyes:

    P.S. That just my rant, don't take it too serious or too personal ;)
    ________
    Total drama island advice
     
    #21 berserker, Feb 17, 2006
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2011
  2. berserker

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    Yeah, this forum is a drug. I better spend this time picking up my whip and go back and forth in my office slashing everyone to improve corporate motivation level :D
    ________
    Video Sex
     
    #22 berserker, Feb 17, 2006
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2011
  3. Sirrus

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    Do you currently use a profit sharing method for these core teams or salary?
     
  4. ggambett

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    The original team, the guys who have been part of Mystery since the beginning, share profits; the new guy has a fixed salary for now. In the long term I think it will be better to offer a small share of the profits for the guys with salaries, I'm sure it will do wonders in terms of motivation.
     
  5. ggambett

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    I am a single programmer also doing business, design, marketing, support and project management. I have 4 talented artists. The only reasonable option is to hire another programmer and say "hey, now we're two teams and can make two games at a time". I didn't suddenly become evil because I hired someone, did I?
     
  6. gmcbay

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    Capitalist pig-dog.
     
  7. lakibuk

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    Hiring a programmer sounds difficult. Did you hire a friend who has a love for games or doesn't this matter (it's a programming job like any other) ?
     
  8. ggambett

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Exactly this, a longtime friend who is also an avid gamer, I was his professor in the university, and so on.
     
  9. StGabriel

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    Professionally-speaking I have often found myself working on 2, or at times 3, games at a time. However it is almost always the case that one is a primary project and the other is in some way secondary. Usually this is just overlap between projects, one is starting and one is ending. In the ending periods of a project I often find that there is a lot of lag-time. You are waiting for things to be tested, to be ported, you're doing marketing and finding a place to sell the game (which may then require further development to handle the standards of the new market), etc.

    At any time where you are working on something that is not fulltime I think it can be very productive to have another project to put your time into. Having something to take your mind off of a current project is a great way to refresh your view about where that project is and what you need to do to finish it. Having that freshness when you are tackling a project can be a big productivity boost in my experience.

    But I would try to avoid working on 2 projects full-time. It's better to have one project that is the current priority, but to have a second project that is something you can come to when you need a break, sink some time into, and then leave. The best second project IMO is something that you are prototyping and testing for viability as a game. Usually the project that is ending is a lot of detail work and isn't that engaging, so having something on the side that keeps your mind working creatively effectively counterbalances the drudgery of managing art updates, tweaking UI's, debugging configuration issues, etc.
     
    #29 StGabriel, Feb 17, 2006
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2006

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