Student Options?

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by DizzyDoo, Aug 10, 2009.

  1. DizzyDoo

    DizzyDoo New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    58
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi there,

    I'm a student, interested in just progressing from creating 2D games and playing with Python server stuff to experimenting with 3D game development.

    The most obvious path to take is to purchase a 3D engine like Unity 3D, Torque 3D, or similar but the problem for me is being a student and having very little cash to throw around. It's not a case of 'go get a job', I'm working full time this summer flipping doughnuts on the beach to scrape enough money just so I can afford to go to Uni, study Computer Science and get a 'real' programming job.

    I'm looking for cheaper, student options when it comes to getting the required software. I've already picked up an educational version of Photoshop CS2 and plan on doing the same for Maya soon.

    So, what are a broke students options when it comes to grabbing a decent engine like Unity3D or similar? Any alternatives you'd suggest? Extra, perhaps free/open source engines/softwares I haven't come across?

    Thanks,
    Matt
     
  2. Mtg_kirin

    Mtg_kirin New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2008
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    buy unreal3 and use the unreal editor. thats cheap like 50 bucks
     
  3. Ratboy

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    0
  4. ChrisP

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Messages:
    971
    Likes Received:
    0
    For open source 3D engines, look at Ogre3D and Irrlicht. Or, learn OpenGL and use SDL+OpenGL to roll your own basic engine.

    For just playing around and learning, I agree that getting into modding is a good idea. Only be aware that it does get rather a bit more expensive if you want to actually release anything you've done as anything but a free mod for Unreal 3 (or whichever game you end up choosing). :)
     
  5. jb143

    jb143 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    There's probally better options, but Genesis3D is still around as well. It's an old Half-Life-equivalent game engine but it has always been free to use and sell games you make with it. I made several demos with it back when it was new and learned quite a bit about 3D game programming.
     
  6. DavidR91

    DavidR91 New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm a student and I personally swear by C++ and Irrlicht (none of my projects have been complex enough to demand the nuanced control that Ogre gives)
     
  7. Coyote

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Messages:
    697
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm a Torque owner, and I'm still tempted to go back to other options. Ogre 3D and Irrlicht are both good choices, as mentioned here. You may also want to look at Python-Ogre, too --- I haven't messed with it myself, but if you are already familiar with Python it may be an easy transition.

    And take advantage of other open source tools. I am a big fan of Blender 3D and The Gimp. You may want to look at Blender instead of Maya - and maybe use that money to go into an engine instead. :)

    The more expensive tools and engines usually provide some functionality or convenience to justify their price tag. You can dig a hole with a shovel or a backhoe - if you can justify the expense, a backhoe is definitely an easier / faster option, but it may not be necessary.
     
  8. Charcoal

    Charcoal New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2006
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    This.

    I think using something like the Unread editor, to get your head around how things work in a 3D engine, is a great start.
    From there you can go and learn how to do models in Maya, finally progressing to some kind of C++ & Ogre combo to make your own games.
     
  9. electronicStar

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2005
    Messages:
    2,069
    Likes Received:
    0
    I second the unreal option. Plus all the unrealscripts are exposed and moddable from the editor (or more realistically from notepad) and you can learn A LOT about game engine making by studying their scripts.
     
  10. Asvarduil

    Asvarduil New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    Being a new indie developer myself, I've gone the opposite direction - rather than learning an advanced engine like Unreal, I started with 2D. I've found that the RPG Toolkit is really great for learning how to create a game, especially since my first "grand" project Ander's Journey is an RPG.

    I've recently began delving into GameBlender, the game engine that comes packed free with Blender. It's pretty interesting, especially how you can control most of the game's aspects by modifying logic blocks without writing many Python scripts. For the OP, I'd suggest Blender - the steep learning curve is well worth it.
     
  11. Brice

    Brice New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Unreal should work well as others have suggested.

    I also highly recommend taking some time to learn OpenGL, especially if you're looking to get a "real" programming job one day :). You might not be making 3D games right away, but doing some small projects or demos will be a good detour on the way to 3D games and will look GREAT on a resume/portfolio. Graphics programmers are always in high demand in the games industry.

    Best of luck.
     
  12. Brice

    Brice New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    [Removed duplicate post]
     
    #12 Brice, Sep 15, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2009

Share This Page

  • About Indie Gamer

    When the original Dexterity Forums closed in 2004, Indie Gamer was born and a diverse community has grown out of a passion for creating great games. Here you will find over 10 years of in-depth discussion on game design, the business of game development, and marketing/sales. Indie Gamer also provides a friendly place to meet up with other Developers, Artists, Composers and Writers.
  • Buy us a beer!

    Indie Gamer is delicately held together by a single poor bastard who thankfully gets help from various community volunteers. If you frequent this site or have found value in something you've learned here, help keep the site running by donating a few dollars (for beer of course)!

    Sure, I'll Buy You a Beer