StevePavlina.com

Discussion in 'Indie Related Chat' started by Artichoke Games, Oct 6, 2004.

  1. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

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    Hmm... ONE game that still sell for 100.000$ year (only that one)?
    Let me have some doubts about this :D
    I know, Steve is gonna hate me, but honestly I can't believe that dweep still sell so much nowadays... :rolleyes:
     
  2. Andy

    Original Member

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    Looks like I have to agree on that even with Jack (happens... ;) )

    But for us most important really if Steve's way can work for current newcomers. And I'm afraid we get here even more solid NO-NO. That's our problem and our real challenge guys. :confused:
     
  3. Chris Evans

    Moderator Original Member

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    Do we?I don't think this can be assumed. I'm sure most of us are capable of making a decent clone, but do we really know how to make good original games?

    I'm not implying that everything has to be innovative, but the problem for Indies is not merely marketing/sales. There's a lot of uninspired clones and very average Indie games out there, so I don't think it should be assumed that we just need to work on marketing when we need to raise the quality of our games well.

    If we start making more good original games, we'll find that marketing/sales will become easier as well. The days where you could just throw something together in a couple of months and expect to make a lot of money are over. We need to take more care choosing the games we make.
     
  4. MrPhil

    Original Member

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    Why is it hard to believe that a software title could continue to sell well year after year? There are a lot of people in the world, and they do not ‘discover’ things on the net at the same time. I mean I didn’t discover Dexterity.com until years after he started. So the idea that something has to be ‘new’ to sell well doesn’t apply. In fact, I think you’ll find most Indie successes started out with a whimper not a bang, but slowly over time through a process of continuing improvement carved out a good level of success.

    This goes to the heart of our advantage as Indies. The eternal shelf space of your website is the biggest advantage you have. The ‘new’ ness of the product isn’t that important, what is important is that consumer finds your game, finds it appealing, tries out, likes playing it, and purchases it. It is our job as Indies is to make this process as simply and gratifying as possible.

    Granted maybe something isn’t selling because it isn’t fun, or appealing etc. So you have to decided if is possible to fix these deficiencies, or start over with a new product. The idea that something stops selling because it isn’t new just doesn’t make sense to me. Even in the retail space certain games sell for a very long period. Starcraft came out when, 1998, and you can STILL find in on retail shelves, heck I think Warcraft is still on shelves and it came out in 94. The only difference is as Indies if something isn’t selling well we don’t lose our shelf space. This gives us the opportunity to make improvements!

    I’d say this is our number one advantage over the big publishers. They have one shot at a title succeeding. We on the other hand can spend years slowing honing our craft, and improving the games on our ‘shelf.’ We don’t have to be a hit out of the starting gate, but simply remain persistent and over time the odds grow in our favor.

    Just my thoughts.
     
  5. Greg Squire

    Original Member

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    Interesting poll, though I expect most of that is in apps not games. I'd be interested in seeing a similar poll, but for only indie games.
     
  6. DavidRM

    Indie Author

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    From the Indie Game Developer Survey 2002:

    108. How much do you make yearly (before taxes) from your indie products?

    $0- $1,000=27
    $1,001 - $10,000=9
    $10,001 - $50,000=5
    $50,000 - $100,000=4
    $100,000+=1
    Undisclosed=17
    Total=63

    I should do another survey soon, I think.

    -David
     
  7. merovingian

    Original Member

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    Dweep's got a surprisingly large following. Just google Dweep Gold. As for my personal take - the game's a rehash of Chip's Challenge on the Lynx, but seriously, kudos to Steve for doing a quality job and marketing himself masterfully.

    There's a big lesson here - I would not have guessed that said rehash would even sell. I'm very wrong. And I'm very encouraged that there are probably zillions of new niches out there.

    And given that I have 20+ game designs on my blackboard at the moment, I can't help but think I'm going to be doing quite well in the long run.

    I do think, however, that Dweep would need a facelift to compete today. However, given that it's an established title, he has a capttive audience that will reward him well for years to come as long as he feeds them equally well.

    I'd say y'all could do to learn from the master there.
     

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