Stentor Attack : new music based game

Discussion in 'Announcements' started by Hibou, Aug 15, 2008.

  1. Hibou

    Hibou New Member

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    Hi everybody,

    I just released version 1.0 of my Stentor Attack game. It is an arcade-style game which build stages based on your mp3 collection. It is my first attempt at an arcade-style game so suggestions for gameplay improvements are really appreciated !

    Some screenshots explaining how the game works...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    You can download the demo on my web site at : http://hibou.qc.ca

    or directly here.

    Feedback is welcome ! Thanks !
     
  2. cliffski

    Moderator Original Member

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    nice idea, but if I wiggle the mouse back and forth really fast, I always score 100%, regardless of the song :D
     
  3. Hibou

    Hibou New Member

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    Hey ! That's called cheating ! Seriously, do you have an idea on how I could fix this ?
     
  4. cliffski

    Moderator Original Member

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    what you need to do is ensure i'm not wiggling the mouse. So you need to keep track of the last few mouse x offsets. When you check to see if im under a missile, you check those offsets. If they are above a certain threshold, then you just ignore my position and let the bullet penetrate the shield.

    No idea if that would work, but that's what I'd try.
     
  5. AlexWeldon

    AlexWeldon New Member

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    You could also give the shield a maximum velocity, and if the mouse's displacement from one frame to the next is greater than that, just move the shield that much instead. You'll have to reset the origin of the mouse's coordinate system every frame (otherwise the shield might keep moving after the user stops moving the mouse). E.g. something like:

    function moveShield() {
    mouse_displacement = mouse_position - mouse_origin;
    if (Math.abs(mouse_displacement) <= MAX_VELOCITY) shield_position += mouse_displacement;
    else if (mouse_displacement > 0) shield_position += MAX_VELOCITY;
    else shield_position -= MAX_VELOCITY;
    mouse_origin = mouse_position;
    }

    I like that solution better than Cliffski's because the player can understand why they missed... and if they try wiggling the mouse, they won't see the shield flickering all over the screen. You just have to make sure that the MAX_VELOCITY is set such that you can get from one end of the screen to catch a laser at the other end, allowing for reasonable reaction time.

    I've seen paddle games that don't reset the mouse's origin each frame, so if you move the mouse faster than the maximum, the paddle will keep moving even after you stop moving the mouse, until it catches up. That works too, but then you have to leave the cursor visible, so the player doesn't wonder why the paddle is still moving.
     
    #5 AlexWeldon, Aug 15, 2008
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2008
  6. JGOware

    Indie Author

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    Have the player sprite chase the mouse.x position. That way you can control it's max speed. ;)
     
  7. JGOware

    Indie Author

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    Strange game to be honest. Kind of like a kaboom on the 2600. When playing with "any" mp3 it kind of looked out of place. Maybe a couple of cute, custom mp3 files that gel better with the look and feel of the game might be better?
     

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