Resellers: Going down?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by Acord, Jun 5, 2009.

  1. Acord

    Acord New Member

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    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/06/04/BUDA17R8RG.DTL

    It seems that publishers are indeed taking offense to the reselling of software. I don't remember the argument(there must have been 1000 anti-piracy threads on this board) where I equivocated that if you treat something like property, one set of rules works, and if you treat it like data, another takes effect.

    When a reseller sells a used game, they make money while the developers/publishers make not a dime(not that can be proven) from that sale. So do games deserve to be treated as data and hence meta-property that must be handled a certain way despite the media it is printed on or are they to continue to be treated like physical property, which will null just about every EULA in existence and force developers and publishers to focus exclusively on a digital model to get the maximum benefit?

    I'm still waiting on the system where 1% of the data is run on servers only, so that pirates no longer have a full program to execute. I'm betting the day is coming though :)
     
  2. Pyabo

    Original Member

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    Come on, didn't you hear about OnLive... it's going to be 100% on the servers! <chuckle>
     
  3. Spiegel

    Spiegel New Member

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    Utter bull****...

    How can one say that a 10 hour game holds less sentimental value than a 45 min CD or a 1h30 movie???

    Perhaps its because in most CDs or a movies I buy I think that my money was worth it, but in most AAA games today I totally feel ripped off? Who's fault is that?
    Also when going online multiplayer people still have a reason to hold on to the game, but most games today are so enthralling in online multiplayer as watching the grass grow.
    Who's fault is this?

    The games? the Resellers? Or the developers that spent the last 3 years making yet another sequel that resembles 80% of the other AAA launches?

    When the resell market excuse goes down, when the pirate excuse goes down where do they turn to? "The movie industry is stealin money from developers?"

    I still don't have any new generation console because of this, almost no game today holds my interest enough to justify spendig 180 € on a xbox arcade system. If fact the only reason I would buy an Xbox would be to develop games to the Community.

    And Im not going to enter the whole "I bought a something that qualifies as my property so Im entitled to sell it.. like lets say a car or a house", which alone demolishes their argument.
     
  4. Sybixsus

    Original Member

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    I don't remember seeing it, but I'm glad you restated it because it's an excellent - and often overlooked - point. To me, games are property, but that's just my view and I'm not rabid on it, but I do absolutely concede that you have to accept the argument that there is a valid right to resell if you're going to call it property. Equally, you have a real problem calling software piracy theft if you're viewing it as purely data to license. It's really becoming a computer offense like hacking or possibly a financial crime like fraud, but they're not crimes of property if software isn't property.

    I don't know if it will be via streaming video or what, but I do think that a 100% strict server/client data licensing solution is the inevitable end game. You can already buy almost every PC game as a download, and full console games are going to be available as downloads soon ( eg: new PSP, even Sony Online and XBLA ) These systems don't yet, but will one day, offer an almost complete solution against piracy, and the law will at some point be able to determine resale because there won't be two different distribution models as there currently are.

    I really like the digital model. As a hard-up developer I can't afford to turn away (good) retail publishers if they come banging on my door, but I really think digital distribution is good for everyone, and even better for the Indie. The playing field becomes much more level when the shelf space becomes unlimited. Ok, storefront shelfspace is still limited, but not shelf space in general.
     
  5. kevintrepanier

    Original Member Indie Author

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    Spiegel, I too was really shocked by that sentence. It does point to a radical problem of game development. I'm afraid that game development has become a lot more of a business than an art, in comparison to the music and movie industry which are still a business BASED on an art. Frankly I have not encountered much games that were worth replaying in the past few years. Mostly because a lot of games look identical, so if a player likes a particular "genre" of game, then he can discard and play another, which will be just as generic as the first.

    Where's the art nowadays???
     

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