Research paper

Discussion in 'Game Design' started by TinyGiraffes, Feb 4, 2018.

  1. TinyGiraffes

    TinyGiraffes New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hello, I'm an aspiring game designer and doing a research paper on being a game designer for high school. Part of doing this project is getting an interview from an active game designer. I was hoping someone could help me with this, If you're interested in helping me that would be great! I just need you to answer these 5 questions.

    What experience might you need for this job?

    What experience might you get from this job?

    What are the Hours like for this Career?

    Is there anything extra that you would recommend to learn in order to get better at this job or something to learn before going to college?

    Is there anything you know now that you wish you knew when starting out?

    If anyone could help that would be fantastic [​IMG]
     
  2. TheTodd

    TheTodd New Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2017
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    19
    I can help with this.

    1) Experience wise, you need to know what you're doing, especially for the Game Designer position. That's often why most jobs require a college degree in game development (which I have), as the school's course teaches you the more nuanced things that go on in Game Design.

    2) You learn how to make a game from start to finish. Game Designers have very important roles throughout the process. Admittedly, they're more active in the beginning of the game than the end, but they work throughout in many development studios.

    3) Depends on the studio you're in, and what part of the game's process you are in. It also depends if you help out in other fields of Game Design like programming or QA. Some people make a full-time living being a Designer, others don't.

    4) College is honestly the best learning experience for this. However, you can study up on what it means to be a true Game Designer, start to learn the process you're getting into.

    5) That college is expensive. lol. Seriously though, the video game industry is for those who are dedicated to making games. You won't get a degree and instantly get a job afterwards. You have to earn it.
     
    TinyGiraffes likes this.
  3. TinyGiraffes

    TinyGiraffes New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
  4. Betacade

    Betacade New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hey @TinyGiraffes! To add to TheTodd's excellent response here's something else to consider. You're in High School now, right? To piggy back off of TheTodd's comment about "earning" your way into a job, you can start that process now. You have an incredible opportunity at your age living with so much (free) technology at your literal finger tips. On the flip side (paradoxically) you have armies of other kids from around the world doing exactly the same thing, trying to get a into job into the industry. Here's a few ideas to get ahead of at least 75-85% of the crowd. These tips work for everyone else in the industry i.e. Developers, Sound Engineers, etc.

    1. Website. Look into WiX or some other easy site to create a basic website for all of your work. Basically all you're going to do here is post a blog, and develop an email list. The point is to get folks to follow your journey. You can try something like 1 post a week to show what you've learned, what you've produced, and/or friends projects, people you've met. You may not understand but in 5 years when you have 1,000 email followers, one of them may become a boss, mentor, partner, or raging fan that could pay you big bucks.
    2. Network. Make friends in your classes with the folks who are participating and actively producing art outside of class. These people are more likely to follow a similar journey. Having friends in the industry early is always a good idea. Same with teachers, do extra credit, ask for extra work, volunteer to help teach a class, come after school just to learn more. Learn. Learn. Learn. You can party later.
    3. Social Media. Like your website, use your social profiles to build out your community base. Also converse with other designers and game industry professionals. (Have your website listed on all your social profiles). Also in social, no need to attempt to seem like a "big shot". You are just starting out and authenticity will take you farther than trying to project a character you are not.
    4. Collaborate. Find small projects outside of school like game jams, hack-a-thons, or other gaming events to display your work or participate in a team for a competition. The more you do now, the more you learn and the longer your resume is. Just imagine, "Hi my name is __ and I've completed 387 projects. My portfolio consists of 1252 character models and I've won 5 game jam competitions." You would be on the express lane to any company you apply for.
    In summary realize that right now, you're a baby goldfish in the ocean. Get a central hub for all of your work (website). Network with classmates, teachers, professors, friends, and other industry professionals to build out an amazing rolodex for your future. Engage in the industry communities via social media (don't ever spam, just talk to people). Finally collaborate to show you're a team player who can get results. This will take years and lucky for you, time is on your side. Plan ahead, measure your online presence, keep learning and have fun.

    Best of luck out there! Maybe one day we'll have you on for an interview (we're still growing ourselves).
    :)
     
  5. TinyGiraffes

    TinyGiraffes New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thank you ill have to keep all this in mind, I already have the basis of a website just waiting to be turned into a real one!
     
    Betacade likes this.
  6. Gameicreate

    Gameicreate New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    AIDs
    Autism
    Artificial insemination
    This all is research paper topics.
     

Share This Page

  • About Indie Gamer

    When the original Dexterity Forums closed in 2004, Indie Gamer was born and a diverse community has grown out of a passion for creating great games. Here you will find over 10 years of in-depth discussion on game design, the business of game development, and marketing/sales. Indie Gamer also provides a friendly place to meet up with other Developers, Artists, Composers and Writers.
  • Buy us a beer!

    Indie Gamer is delicately held together by a single poor bastard who thankfully gets help from various community volunteers. If you frequent this site or have found value in something you've learned here, help keep the site running by donating a few dollars (for beer of course)!

    Sure, I'll Buy You a Beer