quiting my day job

Discussion in 'Indie Related Chat' started by NothingLikeit, Dec 20, 2006.

  1. MrQ

    MrQ New Member

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    Most games companies will have a clause that sais something like "all your work, creative ideas, code blah blah blah is belong to us during your employment period" some companies may let you change that to something such as "work created during employment hours and not in direct competiton" But your best bet is to simply just sign the contract and not say a damn word to anyone (not even good friends at the company) about your home business.
     
  2. Tom Gilleland

    Original Member

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  3. Sirrus

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    Every game company I've worked at has let me declare my previous/current works as my own (in a contract exhibit).
     
  4. rocus

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    wow, good luck there ;) me myself is a 100% full time indie. No matter what, it's better to have your own company, even if it's only have you as the employee :D

    Cheers, and good luck once again
     
  5. S2P

    S2P New Member

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    I can relate to this thread quite well, to cut a long story short. In 2005, I had the opportunity to quit my job after being in it for 9 years, you then get taken for granted, working to the bone for very little return for your efforts. Responsible as a manager for anything that goes wrong. When I quit my job I setup an IT consultancy at first, but travelling more than bringing in the work I found exhausting. I then setup my second company to top up my income, even though its a competitive industry in game retailing, I needed the experience, especially if I were to make and sell my own games. It then came to a point when my savings were running out fast. The IT business had to change into a web design business, so that I could work from home. My wife went back to work, I then looked after my two kids and ran both businesses at the same time. After managing to secure one investor for my game development business, I now have a team of contractors working for me on a few projects so that I can then get these games to the production stage and be able to work 9-5, with weekends off (here's hoping) and my wife back at home looking after the kids which she misses.

    So the moral of the story is, if you quit your job, then go for it, always have a backup plan and be two steps ahead. If you are really serious about things then you will be determined to make it work, and when things are tough, you will shine through. Just stick with it - give it time, and it can sometimes take a year or more to really get going, but when it does you will be happy that you did, afterall everything is a learning curve, especially if it is new to you.

    If you need any advice, tips or just do not know where to start with your game, feel free to contact me.

    Jules
     
    #25 S2P, Jan 20, 2007
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2007
  6. NothingLikeit

    Original Member

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    gee thanks man. How did you get through the lean times? I have 2 jobs so quitting one won't be a major loss but the money is always the biggest specter. I am lucky enough not to have children or a family though.
     
  7. Ricardo C

    Original Member

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    I was reading an article by novelist Holly Lisle, about how she finally quit her day job for good (she had quit it once before, but had to go back when her writing income declined). I know it's a completely different field, but it's a good rule of thumb:

     
  8. lakibuk

    Indie Author

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    @last
    Some words of reason in all this fulltime indie mania.
     
  9. NothingLikeit

    Original Member

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    i'm not telling anyone to burn the ships lakibuk.... But since my main job is not supporting me or letting me advance in the way that I would like, it's time to consider other options.
     
  10. C.S.Brewer

    Original Member

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    one small late night datapoint.

    when I quite my day job, I had a great job, I enjoyed the people I worked with, I had never made a game before by myself (although at the time I thought I knew what I needed to know to do it, <slaps self>) I've always wanted to do this. I saved up enough money to make it for a couple years and said bye to everyone.

    since then,
    I still haven't finished my game, but it's a lot closer than it was
    I started contracting about a year into the 2 years, and
    I had to get a full time job another 6 months later.

    I now have a better full time job than I would have gotten if I had just continued on at the same rate with my previous job. I've learned so much over the past couple years.

    I'm very happy with the decision to just walk away and give it a shot, even if my game is never finished, it's still one of the best decisions I made.

    There's a lot of luck, contacts, and serendipity in what happened to me, so not saying anything like it will happen to you, but man if you are thinking about it and have the means to try, do it, time is short on this planet! if you succeed or fail, you'll certainly learn some good stuff along the way...don't be stupid about it and put yourself in debt for life or anything, but if you can, go for it :)


    now I just have to work on the quitting for good part myself
     
  11. Bad Sector

    Original Member

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    If you don't do it, you'll regret not doing it. If you do it, you'll have a hard time by doing it and regret doing it. In either case, you'll want to have chosen the other option. Human nature tends to focus on the negative parts of whatever happens.

    Try to look the bright side: you'll work on what you love. You'll do what you like. You'll learn a lot of new stuff. You'll gain experience in the field you prefer to work on.

    Even if you fail to make a profitable game - or even finish one - you'll gain other stuff to make worth the try. In some sense, you cannot fail with this choice. Failure or success isn't only about making money.

    I'm not saying stuff that "people want to hear". I'm doing what i'm saying for some time now and i don't regret it. The only reason to go back to a full job is that if this full job has to do with game development.

    Actually after reading this thread, i have the feeling that what people want to read is along the lines of "forget it; you will fail". It makes sense; it's easier and more comfortable to not try and blame some abstract "situation" of how things happen, than try and blame yourself for failing (of course people always fear the Big Bad Dark Side of things to happen).

    My $0.02 to make you think.
     
  12. NothingLikeit

    Original Member

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    That's just it I won't regret my choice. I know I want to be in business for myself. So even if I'm eating Ramen for months on end I won't care.
     
  13. amaranth

    Original Member

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    I just quit my day job to focus on games. Ironically, I'm working more hours now than I ever have before. It seems crazy that it would work like this, but I thought I would give you a heads up.
     
  14. SteveZ

    Indie Author

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    I second that and I'm lovin it.

    -Steve Z.
     
  15. lennard

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    I quit my day job 4 years ago knowing full well that the financials would be a challenge. Just this year we have gotten over the top but I would say that, for us, the freedom to live how we want and make the things that interest us (not the royal we - my wife writes) have made the price of entry well worth it.

    Good luck!
     
  16. vjvj

    Indie Author

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    Just to throw out the flip side to that coin (while hopefully remaining rational), this is what I've been trying to accomplish and it's just not working in my situation. Even when not taking the above literally (because if I waited to make as much as my salaried job before quitting I'd NEVER QUIT), one still can't escape the fact that you are essentially working two jobs until you take the plunge.

    It's harder than it seems. I had the bright idea of staying in the industry to "keep my chops sharp, it'll help my indie exploits, etc"... But in reality I work a minimum of 50 hours a week, and usually much more than that. Tonight I was able to get two hours of indie work done, and to accomplish that I had to immediately begin working as soon as I got home without even taking a break. At this rate, it'll take me forever to ship my next product.

    Right now my thinking is that there has to be an intermediate step in all of this. If I could bring my monthly expenses down and work part-time 20 hours a week doing who-gives-a-crap, the productivity benefits would be tremendous. In fact, when I'm not working that's basically what I'm doing; laying the groundwork for a massive cost of living overhaul so I can quit my damn job :)

    So while it's important that one doesn't just jump into full time indie without any financial planning, I'm living proof that risks have to be taken here and there. Don't get stuck like I am!

    I just know that later on I'm going to regret having not quit earlier. I just know it :)
     
  17. NothingLikeit

    Original Member

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    wow vivj that's more real than you know. I know there's a certain level of risk I have to assume. But I'm lucky I don't have a family to consider yet.
     

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