Promotional mini-games

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by kglarsen, Aug 1, 2010.

  1. kglarsen

    kglarsen New Member

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    I'm working on a rather large project at the moment. Then I got a (What I think is) a brilliant marketing idea - Creating one (or more) promotional mini-games.
    The mini-game(s) should one way or the other be related to the "real" game.
    These mini-games could be uploaded to various flash-games sites so that as many people as possible get to try them out. When the mini-games are over it'll provide a link to the website which gives info on the "real" game currently in development. This could serve as grabbing the attention of possible new "followers" and keeping the attention of current "followers".

    Has anyone experimented with this?
    Would it be worth the efford?
     
  2. berserker

    Indie Author

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    We did that with GUNROX mini-games. It was worth it initially but recently it stopped working the way it used to be. All because quality bar on flash games is rising too.

    So it depends on what do you mean behind "mini" games. Today even such mini-games as flash must offer elaborated player experience in order to generate any decent traffic.

    Currently we are making a more complicated flash game for promotional purpose which includes non-linear levels, different storylines, lot's of items and upgrades, etc.

    Speaking about your idea - you should do it other way - realease your big complicated project first, and then starting making flashes. Otherwise you will just waste all potential exposure and sales.
     
  3. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

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    It's not a new idea, there are some people like Amaranth who started doing freewares RPG and then moved to commercial. Though berserker advice is valuable, is better to have a big game first, then promote that through minigames.
     
  4. Nexic

    Indie Author

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    I've done this with a great deal of sucess in the past. Though you should definitely follow bezerker's advice, ie.

    A. The flash minigame needs to be brilliant, can't just be a quick 3 day project. If you don't get into the featured spots on the flash portals it's not going to be worth your time.
    B. You should make sure your main product & website is already out there and optimized to generate maximum revenue.
     
  5. richtaur

    Indie Author

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    You haven't said anything about how big your team is or how long you've been in development or anything, but I saw two big red flags in the first two sentences. First, you're working on a "rather large project". If that's the case, your large project is going to take tons of work, so don't spread yourself thin by working on several minigames!

    Check out the What things should an indie game developer never do? on Stack Overflow. Many of the answers included:

    Again, I don't know how big your team is or what experience you have. But many many indie devs make the mistake of trying to climb a mountain before they learn how to walk. My suggestion would be to concentrate on shipping your game first, then worry about promotions once it's done.
     

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