Problem with CD publisher

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by Natalie, Sep 6, 2005.

  1. Natalie

    Original Member

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    Hello everyone,

    I want to ask may be a bit stupid question: How can I find a good CD publisher for my company's game?

    I wrote to a great deal of publishers such as Ubisoft, Activision, Dreamcatcher and so on. But they don't reply.
    I see the reason-our company is not too big, very well-known since we are too young yet. But nevertheless, our games are quite professional, they are of high quality. Besides, our software is being distributed rather well by on-line publishers.

    So how to start? How is it possible to make publishers pay attention to may be not yet established but talented developer's team?

    I saw a similar topic in this forum -"Value publisher" but the author is working without a team. We have a good experienced team but still, WE HAVE THE SAME PROBLEMS.

    Please, could you help me by either prompting some publishers or just by giving good advice. I'll really appreciate it.

    Many thanks and sorry for being too long.
    Natalie
     
  2. cliffski

    Moderator Original Member

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    it's normally good to include a URL for your site, so people can see the qaulity level of the games you are describing. There are lots of 'budget' CD publishers who may be intrested in your games, although they may not pay very much. The main thing is to ensure you speak to people who have worked with a publisher before signing a deal, espeically an exclusive one, and to be 100% sure you geta t least $1000 upfront bare minimum. Anyone not prepared to do at least that is generally wasting your time.
    I've dealt with a good half dozen retail publishers over the years, some good, some bad, some just thieves.
     
  3. Robert Cummings

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    Not being funny but perhaps you are too timid. You need people who deal with this stuff. It is a method, and an established one.

    If you don't have people who deal with this you can try it yourself, and here is how it is done:

    - Telephone the company and get the point of contact who deals with deals. This person evaluates business opportunities. Get his number.

    - Telephone him and arrange an appointment to discuss a distribution deal. depending on the conversation, try not to put your product forward at this point as it is a good opportunity for them to dismiss it outright. Far better to get a meeting, even if only for half an hour to discuss your proposal.

    - Travel there and discuss your proposal, be convincing and have all the answers ready. You dont ever want to give them a variable answer, always deal in facts.

    I don't think any big companies will arrange this through a letter to be honest. It just isn't done.

    Smaller distributors certainly will - contact them by email AND phone. Letters aren't really the done thing at this stage.
     
  4. Gnatinator

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    I highly recommend you pick up a copy of Game Developer's Market Guide by Bill Bates (ISBN: 1592001041). It covers a lot of this and includes a listing of publishers/developers/agents/distributors etc.

    As for publishers, I suggest you check out O3 Entertainment. They came onto the scene recently and are dedicated to publishing independently developed titles. They just did Alien Hominid, so you could even contact The Behemoth if you need an inside opinion on them.
     
  5. ERoberts

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    I don't think this is possible. I think that the big publishers have just about stopped publishing games from companies without trackrecords altogether. Even established game developers have a tough time getting publishing deals.
     
  6. Natalie

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    Hello everyone,

    My URL is http://www.elephant-games.com ,
    Sorry, I didn't give it in the previous message.
    I think, our games are too small for the big companies.

    Thank you ever so much for all your responses! They did help me. I'll certainly follow all the advice as all of them are quite reasonable.

    Nathaniel, could you give me a link to the Guide? I saw the site of 03Entertainment and liked it on the whole. I think I'll contact them as soon as I speak to The Behemoth.

    Again thanks a lot to everyone for your help! :)
    Natalie
     
    #6 Natalie, Sep 7, 2005
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2005
  7. ErikH2000

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    What is it that makes you think this? Not being argumentative--I'd just like to know. Maybe you could give some account of your personal experience?

    Maybe selling a small game to EA is impossible, but there's eGames, SoftDisc, and all the other budget retail publishers. I work as a contractor for a company, Webfoot Technologies, that regularly sells small games to publishers. I don't know their secrets, and if I did, it's not my place to talk about them. But I can at least see that some people are good at getting these publisher deals. It may be, as you say, that publishers are so heavily biased towards working with developers they have a history with that new developers are stuck in a catch-22. >>shrug<<

    -Erik
     
  8. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

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    I published UBM in germany, UBM and USM in Russia, and going to publish more titles in future. I know that also cliffsky had various publishing deals.
    Surely is possible.
     
  9. Natalie

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    We also published the game in Russia, but now we need some West European publishers. I'm coming to the conclusion that the best way out - is to find an experienced and reliable intermediary between publisher and developer.
    Robert told about this established method. So any ideas of how to do it?
    Natalie
     
  10. Adrian Cummings

    Indie Author

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    You could always try Xing Interactive in western Europe?... I used to work for them in various roles actually.

    http://www.xinginternational.com/

    Let the flames commence :)

    Cheers,

    Adrian.
     
  11. ERoberts

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    I'm sure it is possible to sell games to the smaller, budget retail publishers, but publishers like those mentioned by the OP are a different story. Most of them don't even touch unsolicited material, so unless you have a contact there already, that's a first hurdle. And there's so much competition. Even large studios established a long time ago, with a solid track record, go out of business these days (for example, Argonaut)

    And bearing in mind that the development cost is not the largest cost of publishing a game these days, it is understandable that publishers are a bit picky, even if the developer present them with a fully completed game, and not asking for royalty advances.

    It's all about minimizing risk these days it seems. It is even more important than maximizing profit...
     

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