Name of your game important?

Discussion in 'Game Design' started by coffee, Nov 3, 2007.

  1. coffee

    Original Member

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    Well I am at that stage where I need to name my game, I have 80% finished coding, artwork is being done and should be complete in a week.
    1. So What do I call my game?
    2. Its a light puzzle game so should the title have "puzzle" in there some place?
    3. Could putting "puzzle" in the title turn some potential punters off?
    4. Would Omitting "Puzzle" Mean my game not being scene as a puzzle game at a quick glance?
    5. Its a winter theme game "too late for xmas window IMHO", so should it have "winter" or "snow" in the title?
    6. Is a title all that important for a game?
    Any Ideas guys... I am not looking for game titles just wether you guys think a Title should represent what the game is... I am putting too much into the game title?
     
  2. Jesse Hopkins

    Jesse Hopkins New Member

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    #2 Jesse Hopkins, Nov 3, 2007
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2010
  3. GolfHacker

    GolfHacker Member

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    Your last paragraph negated question 1.

    I think you can answer your own questions 2, 3, and 4 by looking down the list of puzzle game titles at Real Arcade, Big Fish Games, Shockwave, or any of the other portals.

    I'm not sure I understand #5 - are you asking whether a holiday-themed game title is too late for Christmas? If that's your question, then I don't think so - particularly if you plan to release the game in a week. On the other hand, once Christmas is past, people won't be looking for Christmas games any longer, so a more generic winter title may sell better in the long run.

    As for #6, I think a good title is important. If it is humorous or catchy, people will remember it. Also, think about movie and book names - when you're looking at a library or store shelf and all you see are titles, you tend to pass by the ones that are boring or blah - it's the interesting or humorous titles that catch your eye and make you pull the book or tape/DVD from the shelf for a closer look. Same thing applies here - if someone is looking at a list of game titles, you want them to click on yours, so your title needs to stand out from the rest.
     
  4. Andy

    Original Member

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    I believe title is very important really.
    In ideal it should:

    1. Attract appropriate audience.
    2. Explain good half of what is going on in the game.
    3. Be unique to help you track your game at search engines, archives etc.
    4. Your ideas of all-seasonial is very useful part too.

    And so on...
     
  5. Agent 4125

    Indie Author

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    There are a kajillion puzzle games with the word "Puzzle" in them. In a list of games, especially on a portal where you'll usually end up on a list of just title links, it will make it that much harder to stand out. Same with commonplace words like "Mania", "Madness", "Frenzy", etc.

    Anyway, here's a suggestion: Blizz
     
    #5 Agent 4125, Nov 4, 2007
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2007
  6. Tr00jg

    Original Member

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    My 1st rule when coming up with names for games is that it should be in the top 20 (ie 1-2 pages) of Google search results.

    I also like a name that sounds sweet on the tongue, something with alliteration or rhythm.
     

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