multiplayer online game development

Discussion in 'Game Development (Technical)' started by laxmid, Aug 24, 2007.

  1. laxmid

    laxmid New Member

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    Can someone help me knowing how online multiplayer works. I want to know about the games which are not necessarily turn based. I basically need to know how does client-server communication happens. Is there any standard protocol used? Does any game logic or part of game logic run on the server?
     
  2. zoombapup

    Moderator Original Member

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    far too broad a question for here. Try gamedev.net

    client->server comms happens like any other comms (winsock for instance). Standard protocols? well, UDP and TCP for one, but I think you mean is there a standard way of doing the game networking and the answer is pretty much no.

    Does game logic run on the server? absolutely.
     
  3. lebensborn

    lebensborn New Member

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    Anything that isn't on the server is pretty much open to exploitation/hacking and that is something that could kill your game before u even get it made.

    Try make as much of the game mechanics work through the server.

    I myself am not that experienced with networking but i did manage to get a server + client working by using a networking example in Blitz3D. If you go on their site there is plenty of examples and i recommend checking it out to anyone as it has helped me get into the whole concept of programming.

    Very simple but powerful and empowering to a novice such as myself :eek: .
     
  4. laxmid

    laxmid New Member

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    Now let me make my question more clear. I have seen these casual online multiplayer games where about 6 player play a game against each other and one can drop a power-up or (in-game item as they call it) and it affects the opponents game. I want to know how does this happen.
     
  5. ChrisP

    Indie Author

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    Client sends a message saying "hey, I dropped a powerup". Server checks to see if this is possible; if so, it sends a message to everyone saying "hey, someone dropped a powerup at [this location]". They update their game states.

    If you need to ask questions like that, you really need to start networking from first principles. Try gamedev.net, as already recommended. They have a bunch of good articles.
     
  6. MrPhil

    Original Member

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    You'll need a 3rd party tool like OpenTNL or RakNet.

    It sounds like you need a lot more background information before you can ask the right question. this might help: TCP and UDP .
     
  7. datxcod

    Original Member

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    I second that, don't try to make your own network library, there are other alternatives like raknet and for flash you have already-made libs like
    www.electro-server.com
     
  8. Spiegel

    Spiegel New Member

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    Well actually a game which is turn based is exactly the same as any other game... user input just takes longer...
    And I'm really sorry to say this, but if you need to ask this kind of question (this general question and standard protocol), you probably should not be thinking in making any game of this kind... :(

    Just google for networking stuff... its a big question that one... ans too broad to just say it in a post...
     

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