Looking for tips on drawing.

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by Captain.Claw, Nov 26, 2018.

  1. Captain.Claw

    Captain.Claw New Member

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    I've just recently gained interest into 2d game development, i have experience in programming but i need an artist to share some newbie tips for me related to drawing pixel art, im looking for ways of making a good posture for a character, shading tips, maybe some recommended pixel canvas size, and any tips on 2d drawing pretty much. I own a sofware called Marmoset Hexels 3 but i can do well with photoshop or any other app really.

    Thanks to anyone in advance.
     
  2. Dre Reid

    Dre Reid New Member

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    I watched video tutorials on cntrlpaint.com and googled other little stuff such as shading and adding lights.
     
  3. ArdenInTheGarden

    ArdenInTheGarden New Member

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    I'm still learning myself, but I like using Piskel! It's a free to use site that lets you create pixel art sprites and animations, size your canvas however you like, work with layers and customizable palettes, and lets you upload as gifs on URL, download as sprite sheets, and tons of other options!

    A couple things I've done using Piskel:

    Deja spritesheet (3).png Jasper (WIP).gif Jasper (WIP).png Deja gif (1).gif
    Hope this helps!
     
  4. Dre Reid

    Dre Reid New Member

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    Nice.
     
  5. Akshay

    Akshay New Member

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    Particularly if you're a beginner there are certain things that you can learn that will improve your art immediately

    Color Theory

    A lot of programmers who are just getting started with art tend to think of color in terms of red, green, and blue. This is a horrible way to think of colors if you want your art to look natural. If you haven't done this already, the absolute first thing you need to do is start picking your colors with HSV sliders as opposed to RGB ones. RGB sliders tend to lead people to make unsubtle color decisions, such as using pure green for grass, etc (this is one of my personal pet peeves; it's so easy to choose a natural color for grass, even for a beginner, but som many people just pick #00ff00 and end up with really unnatural-looking grass).

    To get a bit further into the color thing, you need to know a couple of basic things about light and shadow. In a natural environment, light and shadow have their own colors. If you're standing outside in broad daylight and look at your shadow, your brain tells you that the color of your shadow is just a darker version of the surrounding color. This isn't actually the case. In reality, on a sunny day, there are two major sources of light: The sun, which is yellowish, and the sky, which is bluish. Your shadow is still receiving light, or else it would be pure black. That being said, the reason you have a shadow is because you're blocking the sun from hitting that area, so the main source of light to that area is going to be the sky. As such, shadows tend to be more blue than the surrounding area.

    This is of course different on an overcast day, or when you're inside (because the ambient light in the room is the color of the walls an ceiling), but as a general rule for beginners, make your highlights a bit more yellow and your shadows a bit more blue, and you'll end up with art that looks significantly better than someone who doesn't already know this.

    Use Photo References

    Short of actually tracing a photo (or pasting content from the photo into your art), it is always okay to use photos as references, even in finished art. That being said, I would stop short of encouraging anyone to just paint or draw exactly what they see in a photo. Look at a number of different photos and combine elements from them into what you want. If you're drawing a person, it's fine to look around until you find a photo of a person with the correct pose and body type.

    Note that since you can't get in legal trouble as long as you don't trace, it's also fine (and encouraged) to credit your reference photos.

    If the photo is released under a Free license, it's also okay to trace the photo, but understand that in that case your work is a derivative work and you need to follow the terms of the license.

    Everyone wants to be able to draw awesome stuff right from their imagination, but that is one thing the definitely takes tons and tons of practice (artists will often talk about having a 'mental library' that they can use). You need to remember, though, that what's important is the quality of your ultimate result, not how you arrived at it. DO NOT BE ASHAMED OF REFERENCING PHOTOGRAPHS. PROFESSIONAL ARTISTS DO IT.

    The Pen Tool

    Tablets are great, don't get me wrong. If you're going to be doing serious artwork over a long period of time, I would strongly advise you to get a tablet. However, it's also important to note that a tablet is only as good as your drawing arm (practice, practice, practice). If you're one of those people who has a bad arm but a good eye, then the Pen Tool is your friend. Advanced drawing programs (Photoshop, GIMP, Krita, etc) can generally stroke a pen line as if you're using a brush. Hence, if you have time, you can assemble something line by line making adjustments with the pen tool, and end up with a result that's nicer to look at than if you'd painted it directly. If you use a vector drawing program (like Inkscape), you can continually make adjustments to your strokes as opposed to being stuck with them once you're done. If you're not a fan of the vector style, you can always start in a vector program and then go to a raster program once you have everything drawn out. Some raster programs also let you work with multiple pen strokes, so you can accomplish this without using a vector program in some cases.

    Layers

    Use them. Seriously. Have a white background layer, then paint on the layer above it. Have shadow and highlight layers. Don't paint on your rough sketch layer, particularly if your sketch layer is a scan of an image. You don't want to have to clean up pencil lines in your final work. You can also use Photoshop for better idea. I mostly prefer using Photoshop on my Hosted Citrix Vdi that helps me a lot as a game developer.

    Brushes

    Use a mostly solid brush with a slightly soft edge, as opposed to using a brush that's completely soft. Brushes that are soft all the way to the middle look terrible when you use them to fill an area, because the area gets filled incompletely. Using a solid brush also helps you to think of your shading and highlights in terms of solid areas rather than lines. You'll break this rule later, but it's good to follow it as a beginner.

    Art Programs

    Use whatever program that gives you the results you like the best. Certain programs act in different ways. Try a bunch of them before you make up your mind.

    I hope this help you. :)

    Regards,
    Akshay
     
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  6. Dre Reid

    Dre Reid New Member

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    No matter how hard i try i could never do anything good by using the pen tool.
     

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