Keeping servers funded

Discussion in 'Game Design' started by Sade, Dec 20, 2014.

  1. Sade

    Sade New Member

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    Hi everyone

    I'm working on a game with a multiplayer/co-op component.
    I was planning to charge somewhere between five and fifteen euros for the game depending on the amount of content and final artstyle.
    Obviously I will need some servers for the multiplayer component to work, so I'll be using a VPS provider I'm already comfortable with.
    Important note: The game does not need multiplayer in order to function, but it adds a lot of depth to the game.

    I'm looking for a way to keep these servers funded, without forcing players to pay a monthly subscription or running a full fledged item store to customize looks.
    I'm thinking about more items and xp boosters, but haven't come up with anything useful for the player.

    Any other suggestions are welcome.
     
  2. Spliffy

    Spliffy New Member

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    What forms successful monetization really depends on the content of the game, not really just whether it has multiplayer or not. I'd hazard a guess at a solution but not without any other details.
     
  3. Sade

    Sade New Member

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    Well, the core idea would be to have a semi-persistent world which is randomly generated.
    The world itself will consist of large square regions to make this generation a bit easier.
    Whenever a player reaches the bounds of his current world new regions will be added.
    Each of these regions will remain in existence for a specified time. This time is reset each time a player revisits the region.
    If the time expires the region is cleaned up and will be regenerated into something new next time the players moves there.
    The remainder of the single player part is a pretty straight-forward roguelite.

    The multiplayer component comes into play when the player visits a new zone.
    A small percentage of these events won't generate a new region, but will instead fuse with another players world.
    This will give players an opportunity to cooperate with others or take them down for their resources.
     
  4. bantamcitygames

    Administrator Original Member Indie Author Greenlit

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    Hi Sade, you haven't really told us what the game is about. What is the game play like and what does the multiplayer add to the game play. What is the theme of the game, etc.
     
  5. Spliffy

    Spliffy New Member

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    Since it seems that the amount of "fusings" with another player's world are based off of chance, maybe increasing those chances is one method of monetization? Really there could be many ways that would depend more on the core gameplay. Are there character classes? Maybe access to new class specific abilities could be something people would pay for? I have to say though, the one thing I have always seen in games that monetize successfully is the ability to get anything that can be paid for with money for free if the player puts enough time into it. League of Legends does this (IP for heroes/runes) and Hearthstone (daily quests and gold for packs/expansions) do this remarkably well. Granted, getting everything for free would require an inordinately larger amount of time than if the player paid for it, but the possibility existing makes people much more open to paying to get there faster, or paying to get something they want specifically.
     
  6. lennard

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    I just researched a dedicated server for Real Estate Empire 3 and found a package I like for around $170 per month. My plan is a mix of sponsored game play and advertising. Subscriptions are nice but I think we are 10+ years out of date for that business model.
     
  7. Nutter2000

    Original Member Indie Author

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    I have a dedicated server for Ferion from xlhost @ $154 / month.

    Ferion is also a partly-persistent multiplayer strategy game, players sign up with an account and the game generates arenas that they can participate for free but need to unlock the tech tree for 5 euros after a certain point.
    It also uses cpmstar and google adsense for advertising.

    It's pretty quiet these days and the monetisation needs some seriously looking at to bring it up to date but the majority of the income has always been from people unlocking the tech tree, it still isn't great though and I'm pretty sure we leak a majority of new users because of the "soft pay wall".
    Advertising revenue is pretty poor on the web these days, I've found, unless you have a massive audience.

    I'm currently looking to see if I can reduce my costs by going with a VPS solution costing around $20 / month, I'm reasonably sure it can be done.


    Like Spliffy said, a popular way to monetise that the big games uses is by using a time sink method, the trick lies in not creating a pay to win situation ;-)

    Good luck!
     
  8. Sade

    Sade New Member

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    Hi everyone
    Thanks for the ideas posted so far.

    I'm on vacation at the moment, with limited internet access.
    I'll post a more thorough explanation of the game when I'm home in a few days.
    So far the ideas of paying to get things faster seem feasible to me and the increased chance of world fusion.

    Talk to you later :)
     

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