Is it worth selling games part time?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by etali, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. etali

    Original Member

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    I'm a student - learning how to make games at the moment, but I'm pretty close to being able to release 'full' 2D games made in directX.

    I'm considering as a project over the next few months making some retro arcade games - I'm currently working on tetris as a personal project and also space invaders as something for uni.

    After that I was thinking of making a few other simple games - for example maybe breakout (don't know how to do the bouncing ball physics yet but that will be a nice learning exercise.)

    These are all games that have been done a million and one times over, so not sure what appeal they would have.

    Is it worth trying to get these up somewhere and sold or would it be too much effort for the types of games they are?

    I'm sure you all know student = broke, so even a tiny, tiny amount of income from these things would help - plus it would be something to put on my CV!

    Thoughts or tips eagerly awaited and much appreciated.
     
  2. cliffski

    Moderator Original Member

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    they are worth doing for your CV and for your own experience, but unless your breakout game is better than ricochet (unlikley) you aren't going to sell many copies (if any). treat it as a learning experience.
     
  3. etali

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    I'm aiming for these games to be better quality than the ones you get on those compilation CDs in Game for a tenner - for starters I want the controls to be smooth and intuitive. I'm spending more time studying theory than coding at the moment unfortunately, so don't have the time to polish things to commercial level.

    I've toyed with the idea of writing games for the nGage since I own one, but I'm a C++ person not a java person, and I haven't gotten to grips with the symbian SDKs either.

    Should I read what you said as 'don't bother with trying to sell them'?
     
  4. Bmc

    Bmc New Member

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    There have been lots of breakout games that weren't as good as Ricochet that've sold well. Bricks of Egypt, Hyperballoid, Ballistik .. but I would agree with Cliffski if you are just learning how to make games, use it as a learning experience. Don't go in with the intention of making money off it but if something does comes out of it later then great!
     
    #4 Bmc, Mar 29, 2005
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2005
  5. Sillysoft

    Indie Author

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    A finished game is a great thing to have on your CV. It doesn't matter if you are selling it or giving it away though.

    If you think some people would buy it then go ahead and try and sell it. It will require some work to set up a purchasing system, etc. If you don't think people will buy it then release it as freeware and you'll have an easier chance to get lots of traffic.
     
  6. etali

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    The aim isn't really to get rich quick or anything, just to ease the pain of university a little bit if possible :)

    Making them at the moment is a lot of fun - I've wanted to make games all my life, tried off and on over the years but never got very far because I hate Win32 / DirectX - did countless 'serious' apps over that time just because I couldn't do the graphics I wanted for game. Then I decided to go to uni to actually learn graphics and good programming practice.

    This might sound sad but I got a real sense of pride the first time I got a sprite to animate and move across the screen! From then on things have fallen into place really quickly.

    How did you guys learn your trade?

    (Sigh, bed time now, gotta be up early :( )
     
  7. Pyabo

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    This is exactly how Spiderweb Software got started... and probably others as well.

    There is absolutely no down side to just doing what you want. You don't need advice from anyone in this forum. In fact, I recommend that you don't come back, you will waste countless hours reading and writing posts instead of working on your games, like the rest of us losers. :D
     
  8. etali

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    LOL - I think you have proof here that it's already too late to save me - couldn't resist one last refresh before bed!

    It's always nice to get a sanity check or see if other people can share their wisdom.

    Plus its' a good way to relax / clear your head when you can't be bothered to debug any more. How come compilers throw up errors miles away from the real mistake half the time.
     
  9. dan

    dan
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    Nothing wrong with cloning a game to learn... I can't think of too many artistic/creative people that didn't start with "borrowing" from an established work.

    You might try thinking of a few cool features to add, a different look, something you can bring to the table. Charge a few bucks less, have a unique artistic look, there's lots of stuff you can do to distinguish yourself a bit.

    I would go into it more as a learning experience than a financial thing, though. You'd probably make more money moonlighting a few hours as a contract programmer for a small business.
     
  10. Jim Buck

    Indie Author

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    Blue Tea Games is doing it for that reason and I think is doing ok in that regard.
     

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