Indie Friendly Online Distributors

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by Jeff, Jan 8, 2009.

  1. Jeff

    Indie Author

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    I don't know of any comprehensive lists of digital distributors, so I decided to post my own, plus Overgrowth's status with each of them.

    http://blog.wolfire.com/2009/01/indie-friendly-online-distributors/

    One thing I am finding surprising is that it is extremely hard to get companies to return your emails. Seriously, I reply to all Wolfire email within a day, if not within the hour. I think we need some kind of email etiquette revolution, because flat out ignoring emails is bad business and flat out rude. If you can't respond to a correspondences within 3 months, then you're doing it wrong.

    I also learned that Manifesto Games is not looking for new games at the moment. :( This makes me sad.
     
  2. TimS

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    I feel your pain. Bigfish, ArcadeTown, GameHouse and Reflexive never bothered to even reply to my submission -- sent two months ago (Nov 8th).

    Realarcade's reply took exactly four business days.

    That is sad news about Manifesto... though I guess not surprising given the flatline traffic data. :(
     
  3. hddnobjcttmmngmntmtch3rlz

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    Do you want a comprehensive list or just an "indie friendly" list? I mean, here are a few big ones you missed:

    AOL
    Shockwave
    Reflexive
    Big Fish
    GameFools
    Spintop
    Arcadetown
    Grab.com
    Heavy Games
    WildTangent

    Not to mention us, of course. I don't know about the above mentioned ones, but I know I am always interested in looking at new content regardless of who it's from. And while I sometimes don't get back immediately, I usually do so within a week or so.
     
  4. Jeff

    Indie Author

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    Those look awesome for casual games, but I have more of a non-casual bias. Do we have a name for games like Overgrowth, Aquaria, World of Goo, Gish, etc. yet?

    That is a hot list that you just whipped up off the top of your head, though.
     
  5. BIGZIPZ

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    Amazing, really, considering your game is highly-polished and fun to play. It never ceases to amaze me how they eagerly lap up more of the same but don't even respond to companies making interesting games. Kind of disgusts me actually.
     
  6. ChrisP

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    It's easy to have individual emails fall through cracks when you get a huge volume of email every day. I tend to allow people some slack and just follow up later.

    'Course, if you've sent several reminders and there's still no response then it's probably time to give up. :)

    Portals are like that because the kinds of games their customers buy are the kinds of games their customers are likely to buy again. Once someone has finished with one HO game they'll probably want to play another. Portals work as well as they do because games are disposable content, and this disposable nature of the product means that they can just keep selling more of the same content. Deal with it. :)

    IMHO this kind of complaint is a bit like an apple grower complaining that he can't sell his apples to retailers of carrots. Stop whining and go find an apple dealer. :p (Or set up your own market stall...)
     
    #6 ChrisP, Jan 9, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2009
  7. GolfHacker

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    I'm not a distributor, but I'm always on the lookout for clean, family-friendly games, especially if there are Mac and/or Linux versions available. And I usually return e-mails within a day.

    My customer base is primarily parents with kids who are looking for games for both themselves and their families. So I don't think Overgrowth will be a good fit for us - I try to restrict my game catalog to games that both kids and adults could play. But I wanted to add my voice for a complete list of sites. I'm happy to affiliate through Plimus and let the developer get the majority of the sale, but if I can't do that, I'll get the game through Reflexive or Big Fish.
     
  8. Cevo70

    Cevo70 New Member

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    Thanks Jeff - that's going to come in handy for me I believe.

    I really like what you got going on, looking forward to Overgrowth, and congrats on the Steam news!

    (hope you don't mind, but I just linked to your pages)
     
    #8 Cevo70, Jan 9, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2009
  9. TimS

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    You're too kind. It's really NOT that polished and falls outside the realm of most of the portal-audience's interests. I'd just rather hear it from the portal than not hear anything. :D

    I entirely agree with this sentiment right up until the point where a company pays someone a salary to do acquisitions and developer relations. There are two folders -- inbox and spam. You look at the emails in those folders. Where is the crack?
     
  10. Leon

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  11. Jeff

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    Nice! Check out this comment: http://blog.wolfire.com/2009/01/indie-friendly-online-distributors/#comment-11610

    It looks like my list got the attention of at least one upcoming distributor.

    Cool website! I see you like Javascript too. ;)
     
  12. ChrisP

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    The crack is where you see the email, but decide you don't have time to look at that right now (something else needs to be done by yesterday, you get interrupted by a colleague, it's time to go home/have lunch) and forget to mark it unread so you never end up going back to it. Or, you mark it unread but you have several hundred unread messages in your inbox reminding you to do something or other, and many of them inevitably get overlooked simply because there isn't time to attend to them (I've seen actual inboxes like this, it's not just a theoretical state).

    Who actually checks their spam folder regularly anyway? I don't. It's full of spam. I don't want to look at that. :p Anyway, some spam gets filtered out at the mail server level and never even hits a spam folder.

    Sending multiple emails increases the chance that you'll be seen and remembered, and if it's phrased in a reminder fashion ("did you get this email?") then it automatically becomes more urgent because people realise "hey, this is making me look bad", so they're more likely to respond.
     
  13. Jeff

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    One thing that might help (from the developer's perspective) is just receiving a courtesy email saying "sorry, I am too busy to answer this email right now. If you don't hear from me within 2 weeks, please try again."

    It sucks to be stuck in a state of limbo where you don't know if the recipient has even received the email. My hope is that if enough people make noise about this problem then companies will have to take this email problem seriously or risk losing their "indie friendly" status, which actually means a lot right now.
     
  14. hddnobjcttmmngmntmtch3rlz

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    Yeah that list is definitely quite casual. But some cater to both. Wild Tangent for instance.

    I haven't had a chance to play your game, I'm gonna go check it out right now ^_^
     

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