How to Motivate Players?

Discussion in 'Game Design' started by Bardia_E, Jan 10, 2016.

  1. Bardia_E

    Bardia_E New Member

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    So I'm making a 2D game based on unity engine, I've done a couple of basic things on my own and I'm actually doing all the scripting, animations and graphics, storyline and gameplay design and the other stuff on my own, but I need help to make the game better. Because it lacks motivation.

    The game is about an astronaut abandoned in space, trying to build a spaceship to get back home. I actually thought of some sort of storyline for it but it needs serious work, so I need help with the storyline. Also I have some ideas for the gameplay but I would like to know other ideas on a fun and interesting gameplay, so the base gameplay includes collecting resources to build a spaceship while trying to overcome the problems you encounter, such as lack of friction or not having a huge inventory space. I want the game to be huge and not linier so everything should be dynamic except you wake up in the middle of space and your goal is to build something that will give you enough momentum to get past the gate(its kind of a portal that you need to have a certain momentum so it activates). But the base gameplay can be quite boring without dynamism and interesting events. So I need some ideas how to make it more addicting and interesting and less boring. Basically, some motivation for players to play the game.

    I personally thought of collectibles and there are tons of objects that can be found in the empty quite space which you can interact with some and collect some. There are also crazy ways to move around including firing the guns governments through away in the infinite space to jetpacks made out of fire extinguishers and a lot more. And also some of these objects can be built, others can be found in the environment.

    Basically, I'm trying to make an open world(kind of) big 2D game that offers a lot of exploration and gameplay, but having just a large environment is not enough, it needs to be interesting and fun to make a large environment a good thing!

    So tell me what do you like in a game like this and your general opinion on this.
    If you're interested to help me further with the game(coding, graphics or anything) comment bellow or contact me at bardia.eghbali@gmail.com
     
  2. sir_echo

    sir_echo New Member

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    Going for the starbound kind of thing?
     
  3. Bardia_E

    Bardia_E New Member

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    Maybe. But it's less of a platformer, I'm trying to create a unique gameplay, combining the 2D world with exploration and crafting, trying to make an open world 2D game. Starbound is like a 2D Skyrim but I don't wanna make something like that
     
  4. bantamcitygames

    Administrator Original Member Indie Author Greenlit

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    You could have oxygen (or some other resources) run out with a big gauge that the player can see and when it gets towards empty it can flash and such. The player would have to somehow extract/generate more to keep playing (kind of a side mission).

    You could have asteroids fly in and tear off part of the player's in-progress ship. The player would have to build some type of deflector system to prevent it from happening.

    You could have mini-games (like sliding number game) anytime you want to do something complex, like align the thruster coils or whatever.
     
  5. kevintrepanier

    Original Member Indie Author

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    Think carefully about the reward schedule.

    The player needs to find "normal" useful things frequently (like oxygen as bantam suggests or some kind of currency) and more important things (like power-ups) at regular intervals. Interesting power-ups allow to do new things and open new areas to explore (think old Zelda games or Super Metroid). Show "locked doors" (though they don't have to be doors, they can be rocks to destroy, gaps you can't jump, objects you can't move) so that the player know there is more to do and will go out of their way to find what they need to get there.

    The normal things one finds should lead to getting more important things (like buying a new tool with the frequently found currency). It needs to be meaningful to the player ("If I get enough money, I'll be able to buy a shovel. With a shovel, I'll be able to dig my way into this new area I haven't explored. Let's kill more monsters to get the money!").
     
  6. Bardia_E

    Bardia_E New Member

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    I have a little bit of code that generates needed stuff at a logical rate so there will be enough oxygen if the player is moving around and looking for stuff, although some areas will be harder to explore. Common things can be crafted into different tools and those tools can be crafted into more complicated ones. I thought of a 4 Tier object categorizing that is kinda complicated and I don't want to get into that right now.
    The game is about a lonely astronaut left alone in the infinite space, so currency doesn't make much sense.
    But the locked doors is what I really need, so I think, things like semi destroyed spaceships or big rocks that contain important resources in their core and require a special tool to be explored are great really necessary and they give the game the motivation it needs. Thanks for the advice Kevin!
     

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