How to get started

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by destron, Apr 30, 2005.

  1. destron

    Original Member

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    I was just wondering, how would a person get started in the indie/game business. I love computer games (playing and designing), but where would I start if I had no programming language fluency AT ALL?
     
  2. z3lda

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    If you got money I suggest you pay people to make your game designs. If not, start reading.
     
  3. destron

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    another question...

    I was also wondering,
    Is it LEGAL to take snippets and lines of code from other people's projects?
     
  4. otaku

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    If programming is not your forte then I'd recommend you get hold of Games Factory from Click Team and pick up a copy of "Awesome Game Creation : No Programming Required" from Charles River Media.

    There is also "3D Game Creation : No Programming Required" that covers 3D games using Jamagic.

    http://www.charlesriver.com/Books/BookDetail.aspx?productID=18866
     
  5. impossible

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    That kind of depends on the license the code has. There is a lot of free code out there. There is also a lot of stuff that pretty much everyone does basically the same way, so if you see how to do it in a book or on a site you'll basically be taking it. Its not legal to take GPL code and dump it in your closed source project. Its also definitely illegal to take code from a company you work at, even code that you wrote, and use it in your own projects. Most code you see in tutorials, books, SDK samples or on sites like codeproject is meant to be used though, so I don't think you'll have a problem.
     
  6. svero

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Id say if you're really really interested in making games you have to learn technology. There are some great game makers that come from non technical pasts who managed to learn to program and make games. It's not easy though. Maybe you should consider looking to see if you area has any kind of technical school where you could take some basic programming lessons to get a feel for what's involved with a little direction. Then I'd suggest looking into blitzbasic or another higher level game making tool like multimedia fusion, or even shockwave.

    - S
     
  7. destron

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    the 3d game maker

    What about the 3d game maker @ thegamecreators.com?
    Is it any good?
     
  8. Nexic

    Indie Author

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    Its okay but you need programming knowlage. However if you are willing to put in that amount of programming I'd suggest using Blitz3D instead.

    Your games will run faster, your game will actually work on most people's PCs, and you won't spend so many hours pulling your hair out over bugs in the interpreter.
     
  9. destron

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    huh

    what the heck is blitz3d? (sorry, I have no knowledge of this sort of thing)
     
  10. Nexic

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    Well if you've had a look at DarkBasic already then it's basically the same sort of thing.

    Of course you may be thinking of another product they offer, the one that requires no programming?

    Well I wouldn't recommend trying to make a commercial game with something like that, you at least need a system that *can* have some form of scripting or programming, otherwise you will be very limited in what you can make with it. But if you just want to learn a few things then it might be worth it. Though in the end you WILL need to learn some form of programming if you want to be sucessful.

    Anyway, here is the blitz site:
    www.blitzbasic.com
     
  11. whisperstorm

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    Just to insert 2cents for the very nice and greatly improved GameMaker - the latest version has 3d support, and I've been very happy with the UI.
     
  12. Sybixsus

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    No, it's very old and wasn't even good when it first came out. If you want a no-programming solution, 3d GameStudio from Conitec is a few steps up from this. It does require programming for a lot of things, but it would at least be possible to get a game going without any programming.
     
  13. mahlzeit

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    Or, if you want to get started the indie business: buy the rights to someone else's game, (pay someone to) improve it whichever way you see fit, and start selling it.
     
  14. destron

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    Yeah, but how would one go about buying someone elses game?
    Do you just email them and say "Hey, I want to buy a license to your game!"?
    And, what range of price would I be looking at?
     
  15. mahlzeit

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    More or less. But you don't want to buy a license, you want to buy the intellectual property rights: the copyrights and possibly any trademarks.

    As for the price range, I have no idea. Something like a year's worth of expected revenue for that game sounds about right. So if the game makes $500 a month now, the price would be about $6000. But that all depends on the seller and how well you haggle. :)

    There are plenty of games out there with potential that just need a little more work that their authors are unwilling to put into it. Buy them, fix them up, and start selling. Easier than starting from scratch...

    Wanna buy a word game? :)
     
  16. destron

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    no

    Not particularaly, when I design games, I veer toward the action/fps genre.
     
  17. HairyTroll

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    How many indie fps games have you seen recently? This should give you an idea of the amount of time, resources and money needed to develop a viable product in this genre. I would suggest trying your hand at modding an exisiting fps like Unreal, or Quake.
     
  18. destron

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    Yeah, I'm going to do that to learn (about textures, graphics, etc.), buy ya cant sell it or even let people download it for free, cuz basically every part of the quake or unreal engines are copyright and registered.
     
  19. Ryan Clark

    Indie Author

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    You can download the Quake II source code here:

    ftp://ftp.idsoftware.com/idstuff/source/quake2.zip

    It is GPL licensed, but you can still make a commercial game with it... you just have to release your source under the GPL too. However, your art, sound, and other assets need not be GPLed.

    They've been talking about releasing the Quake 3 source, too.
     
  20. Sharpfish

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    I "mapped" for Unreal (then ut/ut2k3/utk4) since 1998. Had a map or two featured on planet unreal etc... I will tell you to do a half decent map (such as mine) takes MONTHS. To do an amazing level takes twice as long (which is why I never did finish my most ambitious map yet). I am telling you this because, though they are good for learning about textures and abstracted shaders and even 3D modelling (In the case of ut2k3+) they are time sappingly addictive. Which is fine, if like me at the time, you were doing it for the love of the game and the community.

    If you are serious about making your own games I wouldn't spend too long in UnrealEditor, hammer or Radiant. It will take as much time to make something worthwhile as it will to learn the basics of C++ and DirectX. If I had started in earnest in 1998 on what I am now doing I could have been set up by 2001/2002. I didn't, I was busy using my creative energy to provide FREE maps that all helped to keep someone elses game going.

    It is great fun mapping and modding for the big retail games and if you are a complete beginner to "everything" then it will help if you study it for a few months and try and complete one half way decent level, just to get used to completing things. The last map I was(am) working on I started over a year and a half ago, after 6 months fairly solid work it was about 75% where I wanted it. I was also learning DirectX at this time and as soon as I could I jumped ship and started working on actual games of my own again. Yes, it is great fun but unless you want to work in the industry as a level designer it will only waste time for you where you could be learning more "important" things if you are serious about making/selling games.

    One thing it will do is improve your 3D skills (level design, texture use etc) which is always handy.

    I'm not saying you shouldn't mess around with them but don't let them consume you or distract you from your primary goal. ;)
     

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