How to earn £12,000 in one year from game development?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by Arowx, Sep 10, 2011.

  1. Arowx

    Arowx New Member

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    @Grey Alien: How long would it take you to earn £12k profit, and how are you doing it? ;0)
     
  2. Arowx

    Arowx New Member

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  3. Indinera

    Moderator Indie Author

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    That depends if the game is successful lol it can take one week or one year
     
  4. j0d1

    j0d1 New Member

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    Nope. Not even 1 cent.
    Like some said, this is a prototype with not enough game mechanics in it and poor art direction.
    Sorry man :-/
    But I'm sure you've learned a lot from that game.
    My advice: let it go and try something else.
     
  5. Grey Alien

    Indie Author

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    Well I spent 2 months on Spring Bonus and it's made more than that already and will keep making money for years. That's the thing, these games make money for YEARS - I still get royalties from my other games on portals so could make £12K in a year without doing any more work (of course I've been at it for 6 years and have 7 commercial games out there). So yeah it's possible to hit your target by making good quality casual games (be prepared to spend money on art and spend a long time polishing). It could be possible if you banged out 10 Flash games and used FGL. It could be possible if you got lucky on iOS. Anyway, I'm not doing casual any more (as my main focus), I'm trying some new stuff and also doing consultancy (which can make the equivalent of £12K in about a month).

    You already have a base level of game making skill and just need to keep on working at it + team up with an artist (for the right visual look). It might take more than a year though, just sayin'
     
  6. Arowx

    Arowx New Member

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    [​IMG]

    OK I'm going to try some simple fast(er) games and see if I can raise some funds to build my bigger projects.

    Thanks for the feedback everyone!

    I'll be back! :cool:
     
  7. Arowx

    Arowx New Member

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    Quick Update...
    [​IMG]
     
  8. lightassassin

    lightassassin New Member

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    Could I throw you a quick suggestion... without trying to step on nexics toes =D

    Take your Cancer Wars (what ever the name is now), make it into a top down zombie shooter, give it WASD movement (or arrows, what have you) and PAY an artist. Design the gameplay around survival and create some neat maps to play. Cancer wars shows you have the skills for that top down style, mix it in with some good 4 player co-op action, some cool guns/enemies and I think you'd be onto it.

    Business direction is completely upto you and depends on how you want to market it also. With good production values and fun gameplay with that style and co-op... depending on gameplay length (how many levels) and quality you could get $5-15us and have the ability to do DLC for added characters/guns/levels/zombies. But all that can be done with the right F2P setup also, again depends on how you want to design your game.

    What I'm saying, is take something you know and use it to your advantage. TBH when your Cancer Wars was 2d I had few quick blasts playing it, the 3d version is held back by the graphics.

    Just my opinion, but good luck!
     
  9. Vdek

    Vdek New Member

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    Your goal should be to make fun games. You're never going to succeed if that isn't your goal.

    Making money is nice, but you're not going to make money without a fun game.
     
  10. Arowx

    Arowx New Member

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    Well I think my games are Fun I just want to get them to the level where people will be willing to part with cash to play them.

    Cancer wars I'm thinking of revisiting it and there are 3 directions I would like to pursue the game, full on 3D (I have to go for it but probably PC/Mac only), complete the 2.5D version (ios/android/pc/mac) and maybe drop down to a 2D version for something a bit different.

    Co-op would be a good selling point but probably a steep learning curve and I would struggle to play test it on my own! ;0)
     
  11. Vdek

    Vdek New Member

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    Consider your constraints first and foremost. Designing a pretty looking 3D game is very time consuming and will require excellent artwork(Pricey). 2.5D is a quite a bit easier due to the limited viewing angle. 2D is also good and much easier for a single indie developer.

    Also Casual games seem to do really well on iOS/Android so you may want to keep that in mind. However Unity does cost quite a bit for those licenses. I would consider trying to come up with a good game concept, selling that on flashgamelicense.com and using that revenue to purchase the iOS/Android licenses of Unity and associated developer fees for the platforms.

    The only way you can get people to "part with their cash" is by providing them value. So you should try to make your games good first and foremost and the customers will come on their own. Now what is considered good is rather subjective, and you may or may not have differing standards from your audience. However that's why you release games, and figure it out :p
     
  12. electronicStar

    Original Member

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    I think you should pay an artist to help you materialize what setting you have in mind because right now it looks messy and uncomprehensible.
     
  13. Ulnari

    Ulnari New Member

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    Hi Arowx,
    first of all, respect for starting your own business, and having already released something (other than me, but I am working it! :)

    I would find it sad if you lose that enthusiam because of not having success, and thus I want to help with my opinion.

    A) Project scope: The more your invest (time-wise in your case), the more your revenue. The return on investment is not linear, but exponential. This rule seems to be true in almost any business, including game dev, cliffski wrote an interesting blog entry about this: http://positech.co.uk/cliffsblog/2011/07/18/double-your-development-time/
    Problem is that most newcomers (including me) tend to be over-ambitious or make too low assumptions on dev time, thus haveing troubles getting their project finished. Therefore many veterans advice to start with small projects, even if less lucrative, but at least it gets done.

    B) Game design & art: To me it seems you are a sound coder, though your game design and art skills are lacking.
    Cancer wars has a basic theme (background story), but the enemy distribution and level design feels random. Same with the island game and the shooting towers.
    Because shooters in general have dull game mechanics, you need to make that up with interesting level design, intimidating or intelligent enemies, and high production value (artwork, effects, ...).

    Since you don't have a budget for those things, you can learn to master everything yourself, team up with other people, or tackle other genres, which are less production value oriented. With other genres I don't mean worn out genres like RTS or MMORPGs, but rather new, creative and unique, or recombining ideas to forge something new. An example for the latter would be Minecraft, which takes inspiration from Dwarf Fortress (gameplay), and Infinminer (user interface). Also check out the games from people posting here, often their games are so unqiue that they fit no genre at all - or even define new genres over time.
     
  14. Arowx

    Arowx New Member

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  15. hippocoder

    Indie Author

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    I think you're basically giving yourself every excuse to discuss something instead of finishing and releasing something. Release anything. It's instant income man!
     
  16. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

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    I think the best strategy to make money is to keep changing the gameplay/engine, make lots of prototypes, and post at least once a day on various game development forums. :D or maybe not?
     
  17. Dogma

    Dogma New Member

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    :D funny! (yay, got my one post). Now I just need to figure out my weekly prototype, hmm, hmmmm.
     
  18. Arowx

    Arowx New Member

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    Project A is under-way, it's something a bit different and is growing gradually the plan is to develop it, test it, and release it.

    All dates TBC, Target Platforms TBC

    b4n
     
  19. bantamcitygames

    Administrator Original Member Indie Author Greenlit

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    The Overgrowth model? Seems like it should work, but it in and of itself is a lot of maintenance.
     
  20. j0d1

    j0d1 New Member

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    +1. You can pre-order it for 30$ since 2008. What a rip off.
     

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