How much do you pay for graphics?

Discussion in 'Game Development (Technical)' started by dxgame, Jul 26, 2005.

  1. Sirrus

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    Coming for a semi un-biased side (producer as opposed to artist or programmer), we need to remember that in most part - art sells casual games. Tried and true mechanics with amazing art and polish will sell, its pretty concrete.

    We can debate forever on the importance of programming (which is true), but when it comes down to it - its pays to pay for good art. You don't want to skimp on the aesthetics.

    I have to (for once) disagree with Daniel and say that art is much more than 1/3 and it is NOT cheaper/more effective to just learn how to create art. To save 2k, you'd still need *atleast* a year to get to a level of effective looking art. And if art sells a casual games, 'effective' just isn't good enough :)
     
  2. Anthony Flack

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    I think that if you pay an artist with royalties, then the artists ought to be a part of the overall decision-making. Because these decisions will affect how large that royalty payment ends up being. It's kind of like making them a part-owner/shareholder of the game in that sense. I can see how that could be undesireable for both parties, if what you're really looking for is a contract job.

    Of course, a little smidgeon of royalties offered as part of the deal is a different matter, if the game is trading on the unique contribution of the artist as a selling point. But upfront payments mean you get to still be the boss.
     
  3. cliffski

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    the numbers look much happier when you omit the portal and take 90%, even if you have *some* affiliates taking 20% of that.
     
  4. soniCron

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    Or, you can leverage your opportunities and sell in both places! ;)
     
  5. RinkuHero

    RinkuHero New Member

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    I've no problem giving the artist some control over the game. All my games tend to be collaborations between everyone involved. A programmer who plays games thoughtfully usually knows no more (and no less) about game design than an artist who plays games thoughtfully, in my experience.
     
  6. cliffski

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    The total cost of Kudos was under $2000, including buying Poser, etc etc. There was some money paid to an artist, but most of it was coder art.
    You might think Kudos looks pretty ugly, and thats fair enough. But I thought it might be worth mentioning. I do so now, because I'm about to spend more money than ever before on the art for my next game, so I was skimming the thread.
     
  7. amaranth

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    I think 15K sounds reasonable for a 6 month project. I've tried the pay-by-hour method, but it's not worked well for me. The pay-by-object method, however, has worked really well. I always try to find artists who are really fast so that they get the good end of the deal when it's time to pay out. As well, it gives them an opportunity to make more money faster.
     
  8. Escapee

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    I'm definitely going to work with some artists for my next game. No more art work by myself :p

    Prodigious escapee (a freeware now :eek: ) is a great lesson for me.
     
  9. DaveGilbert

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    I'm giving my sprite artist about 2100 for his services over a four month development period.
     
  10. linchear

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    Where did you find your artist? Web sites? Acquaintances? Want ads?
     
  11. Sean Doherty

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    It is probably pretty easy to spend $15K on a artist. If I was paying my billable rate for development and design I would be way over $15K. There are a couple of issues at play here. First there are a lot of artist that charge less at places like:

    www.iFreelance.com
    www.eLance.com

    That said, most of them don't have a track record and they are from Countries with a low cost of living.

    The issue with developing a game, in my mind, comes down to trying to find another person willing to work for the revenue (if there is revenue). It seems as though, there are more artists working on video games as a part of their full time occupation than programmers. So it makes sense that in order to eat, they must charge the kind of money that a programmer would charge for working at a bank.

    It doesn't seem like there are to many artists willing to risk working for revenue. I've even seen developers with pretty good track records, Cas for one (despite the Java), be turned down by artist when asked to work for revenue.

    I guess I really don't have many answers. Its best to start with an artist and developer and share the design like Grubby Games if possible. Short of that you need to save up the money for the art. Lastly, I think even some of the top artist will tell you that you that they can do the game art for $4K or $5K if you have a good design document and limit the number of artifacts.

    Maybe :)
     

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