How long do indie games take to complete?

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by RedBowHemian, Jun 22, 2017.

  1. RedBowHemian

    RedBowHemian New Member

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    Hi everyone!

    I am new to indie game development. I'd like to know how long, on average, it usually takes to complete an indie game from start to finish? And what kind of problems are you likely to encounter during production?

    Many thanks :)
     
  2. onpon4

    onpon4 New Member

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    That depends on the game, doesn't it? Some take barely any time at all (see PyWeek for example where you make a small game in a week or less, and I think there are even such contests with 24 hour time limits), while some will take years to make. It also depends on your experience level. More experience = faster development, usually.
     
  3. RedBowHemian

    RedBowHemian New Member

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    Hey thanks for replying! :)
     
  4. tiny_beard

    tiny_beard New Member

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    A big thing is whether you've used the game engine you'll be developing on, too. I just made a 1-2 hour game all by myself and it took 8 months of free time... and about half of that was just making things work how I wanted using the game engine.
     
  5. RedBowHemian

    RedBowHemian New Member

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    Congratulations on all your hard work! :) Has your game been released now to play?
     
  6. tiny_beard

    tiny_beard New Member

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    Yeah, I released it. Not sure if it's any good. I've gotten like 30-35 downloads total and no feedback.

    My worry is that the game is too dull. It's a simple point and click adventure game, and frankly it might not be a compelling enough of an experience to make people want to continue playing through it once they get stuck or bored with a puzzle. I also think one of the puzzles near the end might be messing people up. I'm not entirely sure. I could easily simplify the puzzle, but at the same time there needs to be a challenge.

    Still, I don't regret making the game. It was a great learning experience and I feel like it really honed some of my creative abilities. If I made another game it'd be a lot better... if I can find the time to make another one. I feel like made a Faustian bargain to get this game done and it was a bust.

    Anyway, my advice to you is to just make the game. You don't want to be an old man/woman wondering "what if?" But then again, maybe the fantasy of "what if?" is more satisfying than reality.
     
  7. RedBowHemian

    RedBowHemian New Member

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    'maybe the fantasy of "what if?" is more satisfying than reality.'

    Maybe for some people. I think it's the fear of failure that prevents them from starting / finishing their projects, or perfectionism which leads to procrastination. Btw I'll check out your new game. All the best with your next project if you find time to undertake one.
     
  8. Smashbyte

    Smashbyte New Member

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    Asking how long it takes to make an indie game is like asking how long it takes to bake a cake... It really depends on how big you want it and how much icing and fancy designs you want to put on it.

    Like tiny_beard said, it can be from a few days to a few years. If you're new and on your own then always plan something super small, then once your down, make it smaller. for a newbie, it's going to be the learning process that'll hurt the most in terms of time, especially if you've never programmed before. Working with others helps, but if you're all lacking experience it's probably better (in my opinion) to work on your own for a bit so you can find out what kind of tasks you like/excel at (ie programming, art, design, etc).
     
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  9. RedBowHemian

    RedBowHemian New Member

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    Thanks for the replies, everyone. Some really helpful answers here :)
     
  10. DoomGuy

    DoomGuy New Member

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    As has already been said, it depends. I used GameMaker's visual scripting to make an arcade shooter in a week. Some problems I faced were the lack of experience (bu it is visual scripting so it's easy to pick up), and my lack of internet at the time. These problems may not apply to you but they were the only notable problems with my project.
     
  11. noahbwilson

    Indie Author

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    I made a game in 36 hours.

    I'm also on month 8 of another.

    All that matters is "experience" and "scope" when it comes to the time it takes to make a game. Nothing else.
     
  12. Melo

    Melo New Member

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    Like pretty much all above me said, it depends on what you want to make.
    There are things like GameJams where you have to make a game in 24 or 48 hours and than there are teams who work months on one game.
    Simple mobile games like Flappy Bird won't take much time, but if you want a RPG with a good story and half a million side quests you have to spend a lot more time on it.
     
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  13. noahbwilson

    Indie Author

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    *cough* SELFPROMOTION



    *cough*

    Sorry. Didn't mean to cough, but yeah, RPGs take a while.
     

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