How do you work on one game with other people online?

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by PixelShroom, May 2, 2017.

  1. PixelShroom

    PixelShroom New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2017
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    3
    Basically, I am a newbie in making video games but I'd love to build an indie game team so it would be easier for me to learn and progress. However, I don't know if there is an efficient way to work on one game with people over the internet. I could for example work on a game in a game engine, but every time someone in my team would want to take that game to test it or see anything in the engine, I'd have to send the game on e-mail or anything like that which seems very inconvenient. Is there a way to synchronize this or anything so when I make any changes to the game, another person in the team could look at these changes right away? Btw, the game engine that I want to use is Stencyl.
     
    SantaCode likes this.
  2. Toskigi

    Toskigi New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2017
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    6
    Hey man! This was an issue for me for a bit too, but then we discovered "Dropbox". It works pretty well. Just let people use the same dropbox account and they'll instantly have your files and what not. I'm not entirely sure how it would work with "Stencyl" but I've been using it for RPGMAKER VX ACE and RPGMAKER MV, as well as an older maker "Xtremeworlds" and it works pretty flawlessly (aside from the fact that we would have to co-ordinate who's editing what so that if we save, it doesn't override what they just did.
     
    PixelShroom likes this.
  3. PixelShroom

    PixelShroom New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2017
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    3
    Thanks a lot! I'll use it for a team if I can get one :D
     
  4. GlotzEulor

    GlotzEulor New Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2017
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    4
    For beginning dropbox is a solid solution, but if you have more than maybe 3 team members it can get ugly pretty soon. Because everbody can edit every file, but sometimes you want to go back to a older version or try something out without destroying your project structure.

    There are of course a lot of great tools availabley, I can tell you what we use in our 5 member team.
    - Dropbox: its just a super tool for exchanging images and other stuff you know nobody of your team members edit them to often
    - https://www.producteev.com/ : a website where you can create and assign tasks for every team member, you can also create milestones neatly
    - The most important a Version Control System like SVN or git:
    https://github.com/ is a very nice free tool to easily manage all your code and assets. Basically you can build something on you local machine and if you think its worth committing you can upload it for all your other team members. The cool thing is that you can revert every commit, so you can easily jump back if something was wrong. You can also create "branches" of your project to test new stuff before merging it back to the main source. There are a lot of tutorials online how to set up a git repository online. If you choose to use git (what you really should sooner or later) you can use the free online version which has the drawback that everything is public, or you buy a privat account (~7$ per month). In our team we build our own little server (a 30$ raspberry pi) to keep the costs low.
     
    Scoper likes this.
  5. PixelShroom

    PixelShroom New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2017
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    3
    Thanks a lot for taking your time to reply GlotzEulor. For team management like assigning tasks etc, I know a website called Trello that could possibly work, but I'll definitely take a look at the producteev website as well. At the start I might use Dropbox but I'll take a look at the github website, and since I'm just starting out with game development, I won't be trying to make any money of my work so I'll just use the free version, and having all the stuff being public doesn't seem to be a huge disatvantage.
     
  6. GlotzEulor

    GlotzEulor New Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2017
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    4
    Yeah that's true, and there's nothing wrong with a free github account. A good public portfolio on Github is also a good way if you want to apply for a job later. Best luck with your game(s) :)
     
  7. PixelShroom

    PixelShroom New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2017
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    3
  8. kaufenpreis

    kaufenpreis New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2014
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    3
    Thanks a lot for taking your time to reply GlotzEulor. Very intresting.
     
  9. CodisStudios

    CodisStudios New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2016
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hey Pixel Shroom I Sent you a Skype Invite the name is mr.l.bennett once your accept the invitation we would be able to further discuss the specific as it relates to the potential of us working together.I am new as well and can do a bit of everything.But my specialization will be game art.I have a Wacom tablet and I am now starting out with 3d Modelling and also looking to get into 2d art creation and so on.I also do animation and rigging of models to be animated.I am getting the hang of the tablet and have been practicing since i was already able to draw traditionally here is a practice piece I am currently working on to get the basics of digital drawing down.

    Illustration Practice.jpg
     
    #9 CodisStudios, May 17, 2017
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  10. PixelShroom

    PixelShroom New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2017
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    3
    I was high when I wrote this xD
     
  11. Scoper

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2015
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    19
    I strongly agree with this advice. Do not use dropbox or email to share game code or assets. Source control will prevent a lot of problems like conflicts, missing files, lost work, incompatible versions etc. I even use source control on one-man projects.
     
  12. flavio

    flavio New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2008
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree, too. Moreover, if you are starting now, it is better to learn a distributed VCS (e.g. Git or Mercurial). If you prefer Mercurial, there are services like BitBucket.
     
  13. Justin Duncan

    Justin Duncan New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    If your project isn't too robust might I suggest to have your team use Google Drive. Create a folder and share it with everyone. Make sure they add it to their drive and have a local copy that syncs from the drive. Now the trick is, and really this is for 1-2 person dev teams. The trick is to copy your project into the created folder on your computer that gets uploaded to G-Drive. It will overwrite any files you edited. G-Drive also has version control, although not as robust as say GitHub. :) If you like this idea and want a better explanation I would love to help!
     

Share This Page

  • About Indie Gamer

    When the original Dexterity Forums closed in 2004, Indie Gamer was born and a diverse community has grown out of a passion for creating great games. Here you will find over 10 years of in-depth discussion on game design, the business of game development, and marketing/sales. Indie Gamer also provides a friendly place to meet up with other Developers, Artists, Composers and Writers.
  • Buy us a beer!

    Indie Gamer is delicately held together by a single poor bastard who thankfully gets help from various community volunteers. If you frequent this site or have found value in something you've learned here, help keep the site running by donating a few dollars (for beer of course)!

    Sure, I'll Buy You a Beer