How Buzz spreads

Discussion in 'Indie Related Chat' started by zoombapup, Aug 20, 2010.

  1. zoombapup

    Moderator Original Member

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    Hey all.

    Interesting day for me today. First indiegames.com picked up my tweet about my new game Damzel, then Kotaku australia, then Kotaku usa. Then beefjack.com and I'm sure others will do the same.

    I was watching various twitter tags and other stuff and its just fascinating how it all works. Get on one influential feeder site and things really do just buzz about for a bit.

    Of course, its far too early to get excited by it. But it does at least give a bit of hope that the final game might be interesting to someone.

    I'm sure a lot of you guys have had similar things happen in the past too. For me its like some weird slow-motion effect, a bit like those explosions in inception. Nothing you would expect, but quite surreal as they happen.
     
  2. Bad Sector

    Original Member

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    This is for those doubting the usefulness of Twitter :p.

    Now if i only could make people interested in what *I* make :).
     
  3. richtaur

    Indie Author

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    Cool good stuff. Next time include links in your post so we can all easily see what you're talking about :)

    I had something similar happen recently. I posted a blog called A Simple Guide to Game Development Contests. Nothing too fancy, nothing special; most of our blogs get a hundred views or so and that's it. But this time the fine folks at DIYGamer asked if they could cross-post it.

    The traffic from the cross-post itself has been pretty low but DIYGamer apparently has the attention of several aggregators around the web, so now the blog has been cross-posted to a bunch of random sites. Very cool! Excellent SEO is all about deep linking and viral spreading so every little bit helps.
     
  4. Andrej Vojtas

    Andrej Vojtas New Member

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    I really liked the games you mention, Syndicate brings up nostalgic memories :) Your mix and take on the themes presented sounds definitely interesting.
     
  5. Chris Evans

    Moderator Original Member

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    The problem I've had is replicating that Buzz for the right moment...

    A several years ago before SocioTown went into public Beta, an early trailer got a lot of DIGGs and it really helped build my beta test list as well as open up business opportunities. Unfortunately when the game actually launched, I couldn't replicate the DIGG magic (I didn't really understand how Digg worked). I've never had that same visibility with the press again because 6 months after that there was a flood of virtual worlds, Facebook social games, and etc, so I think everyone in the press and blog sites just dismissed my game as one of those and my game wasn't really unique anymore to them.

    So I guess I'm saying it's obviously good to generate pre-release buzz, but it's important to be able to carry it through launch when your game is actually for sale. The longer you stay in development, the greater chance you'll miss your window.
     
  6. zoombapup

    Moderator Original Member

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    I think the time it will take me to finish will pretty much negate any press I get now. I view it more as a shot in the arm and a lift that tells me that the concept might at least be interesting, but nothing more really.

    I take your point about development time, but I dont think there's any chance of me finishing it too quickly. But on the upside it will definitely be unique both aesthetically and gameplay wise. My hope being I can turn those two benefits around when the time comes to reveal more. I guess the big question is more about wether you should go for a big "reveal" or try for more of a "build up interest slowly" thing like the wolfire guys have done.

    There are risks with both, because if you go for a reveal and nobody cares, you've lost all that time you could have been building grassroots buzz. If you go for the grassroots its potential for you to have blown any buzz you had before you get to market. I've not really thought long either way, but my preference is the the grassroots model and hope to garner a bit of additional buzz along the way (and more when the time nears for release).

    But its all interesting to me. New area of "design" to explore.
     
  7. Cevo70

    Cevo70 New Member

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    Another add-on about Twitter. When people play your game they may very well tweet about it. For me I quickly learned about Raptr, which autotweets games that people are playing (console).

    When I ran Google searches I was seeing tweets from players, and I started following them (this was true of reviewers/gamers too). I sparked up some fun convos with people playing the game, addressed questions, etc.

    Not only was it fun, but it helped buzz around the Twitter universe and I think it bounced around a couple review sites that way.
     
  8. ManuelMarino

    Original Member

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