HOGs - How to build a successful (and profitable) one.

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by BiboGames, Oct 1, 2010.

  1. Grey Alien

    Indie Author

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    I love HoG adventure games (play them with my kids and wife) and would love to produce/design one. Do you hear me BFG!? I'm your man.

    Yeah good list btw.
     
  2. BiboGames

    BiboGames New Member

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    As said my "knowledge" come from marketing research: I think it's really important to do research before you enter a market. Anyway it's possible to make a successful game even if you don't know exactly how you do it :)


    I know you have a lot of direct experience in this field: could you share some suggestions with us? Thank you James.
     
  3. jpoag

    jpoag New Member

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    You haven't misrepresented yourself in anyway. Everything you said is 100% accurate for a developer doing market research and receiving feedback for an in-dev game from BFG.

    It's a 'cart before the horse' situation (not bad, just funny). This would be a great postmortem.


    Suggestions? Nah. What works for one game doesn't necessarily work for another. Most of my experience is learned from making mistakes. Once you start developing a title, getting feedback from playtesting and publisher demos, reading BFG forums, Gamezebo reviews and playing the games of the competition (which is depressing), you're already on your way to becoming a good HOG producer.

    I will say this: be prepared to make changes. I've seen people not make changes to the game because of the amount of time already invested in the current design (that's not working). When you're invested in a section of design or code, time-wise or emotionally, it's hard to scrap the offending piece.
     
  4. jpoag

    jpoag New Member

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    Do it.

    If I were in your position (working for BFG) I would draw up as much design as possible and get some fellow artists (working in the same studio) to mock up some drawings.

    Schedule an appointment and pitch the idea to higher-ups. You already have experience as a presenter/speaker.

    Try to think of as many questions as possible and answer them in your pitch. What sets this game apart? What engine do you plan on using? (Drawn's SDL engine or MCF's Flash stuff?) I know of several games that need to get 'pitched' at BFG before they are green lit.

    When executives look at a project, they look at 2 things:
    1. Can the game perform well in the market?
    2. Can this person deliver this game on-time and under-budget?

    They need to believe in the game and they need to believe that you can deliver it. Worst case scenario? They say no. I've heard one project get rejected but the guy presenting it got hired to a different project (he worked in the mail room, so getting moved to the studio floor was a promotion).
     
  5. Grey Alien

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    Thanks James. It's a matter of resource allocation. BFG decides who makes HOGs and who makes Facebook games (which are also fun to make). It's just that I really like HOGs and have always wanted to make one. Maybe one day...
     
  6. AlexWeldon

    AlexWeldon New Member

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    A few things I can contribute to the thread:

    1) Without going into detail, I worked for a bit on a HO game with someone from this forum, and it ended amicably, but unsuccessfully (well, for me... he's still working on the game), because it was the first time for both of us. If you're making your first HO game, make damn sure your primary art guy has worked a completed one before. If you've already made a successful one, then presumably you know what skills and how much time are required, and can recruit appropriately.

    2) As has been mentioned before, the OP's advice more or less repeats what I've heard elsewhere, and most of it is common sense.

    3) Regarding women and sci-fi, it's probably a combination of lots of factors, but I can tell you that it's not limited to video games only... I do a lot of work for a local board game company, and the owner nixed a robot mascot I'd suggested for a game for little boys... he said the boys would love it, but they don't buy the games, their mothers do, and moms don't buy stuff with metallic/electronic looking stuff on the box. Dads do, but they're not doing most of the gift shopping for kids under 10, apparently.

    4) Women obviously don't hate all sci-fi though, because I know lots of women who profess to dislike sci-fi in general, yet were as addicted to Battlestar Galactica as all my nerdy guy friends. What is it that made BSG palatable to them? Figure this out and become rich.

    5) I just asked my girlfriend why women don't like robots and she said, "Do Transformers count as robots?" and I said yes, and she said "I liked Transformers as a kid. I asked for one, and it was my Barbie's boyfriend." I'm not sure that's useful to the thread, but I just wanted to say that I have an awesome girlfriend. :)
     
  7. Wrote A Game or Two

    Wrote A Game or Two New Member

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    Hahaha, nice! You've got a keeper there. :D
     

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