Have you made backups?

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by Game Producer, Apr 20, 2011.

  1. electronicStar

    Original Member

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    daily backup on USB thumb. At the end of every session or when I just finished a particularly long and difficult job that needs instant backup.
     
  2. Ratboy

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    I've got a constant backup going to a USB hard drive. It occasionally slows me down a bit, but the peace of mind is worth it.
     
  3. Game Producer

    Moderator Original Member

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  4. DigitalDuffman

    DigitalDuffman New Member

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    I think everyone should be using some form of offsite source control that is backed up too. Using source control (like SVN) not only do you get backups but you can revert to any previous version of your code that you checked in too.

    I also have a daily backup job that runs on my website to backup all my databases. I'm going live with online high scoring in the next few days and this ensures that I can at most lose 24 hours of data (and hopefully that never happens). Automated backups are ideal because people forget :)
     
  5. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

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    For web-backup if you host with a decent company like liquidweb, they do 24h backups automatically.
     
  6. desmasic

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    I make backups on the 5 DVD-RW regularly (website work mostly).
     
  7. DigitalDuffman

    DigitalDuffman New Member

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    They all should yes, but they don't always keep those for long. Many recycle their backup tapes, some even weekly, so you're often limited as to how far back you can go. That's why I always feel better to take my own permanent backups too.
     
  8. MindToy Games

    MindToy Games New Member

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    I'm always amazed at web developers (I work as a tech at a web hosting company for my 'normal' job) that don't make backups! I make two backups every week at least: one on CD-RW and one on USB drive, avoids media failure issues and makes sure I never have to redo anything. It's basic software development 101, IMHO.
     
  9. bantamcitygames

    Administrator Original Member Indie Author Greenlit

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    I probably should have a more automated way of making backups, but I do try to keep my game project in sync between my laptop and my desktop whenever significant changes were made and every month or so zip a copy onto my memory stick and every couple months burn a copy to a cd. I've been meaning to look into DropBox or setup an SVN repository somewhere, but who has the time :)
     
  10. ManuelMarino

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    seems we are all very "excessive", probably, with the backups. when will come the time where data will never be corrupted or lost?
     
  11. Adrian Lopez

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    You do. If you have time to post on Indiegamer, you have time to set up a Dropbox account. Setting up an SVN server is a little more involved, but still a worthwhile investment of your time.
     
  12. bantamcitygames

    Administrator Original Member Indie Author Greenlit

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    I know, I know... thats why I put the ":)"... its one of those things that is easy to do and you know you should be doing it, but for whatever reason you just never get around to it.
     
  13. Desktop Gaming

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Talking of Subversion, I noticed Assembla are offering free private repositories again, with unlimited projects and users up to 2GB.
     
  14. Gary Preston

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    If you do setup a DropBox account, sign up via a referral. Then you and the person who referred you get an extra 250MB free storage.
     
  15. Richard Nunes

    Richard Nunes New Member

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    I work between a desktop and laptop using a USB key as a medium. That means I have three live copies at all times. I use a fireproof, waterproof hard drive as a backup that also stores physical documents like my passport and birth certificate. I also copy my entire hard drive to DVDs once a month and store them in the same fireproof, waterproof box. One cannot be too careful about losing months of work.
     
  16. ajin115

    ajin115 New Member

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    I was using only hard drive for my backups, but now using DropBox.
     
  17. Meltra Bour

    Meltra Bour New Member

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    +1 for DropBox
    Work Stations -> DropBox -> Sync to other pc's, EU File Servers, US File Servers and Home Server

    So all files are on 5+ System, at 3+ location and updated 2-3 times a day.
    Besides that our file server host has a separate back-up system in place as well.

    As for web sites, don't trust others to do it for you and test the system. My home server copy's all changed files over ssh every day (icl. db files ofc), these get trow in to the cloud over dropbox as well.
     
  18. bbjones

    bbjones New Member

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    Do any of you include periodic recovery testing with your backup plan?

    It's great to make backups, but do you know they work?

    I've been through a real-life situation where our offices burned to the ground and the pair of off-site backups both failed recovery.

    Rearding the fireproof box, as far as I know there is no such thing. Only fire protection which usually has a time limit of 2-4 hours or something like that. It doesn't take much high heat to disable a hard drive. Even if the platters survive, professional recovery services are expensive.

    Not fun.
     
  19. Richard Nunes

    Richard Nunes New Member

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    You're right, "fireproof" is the marketing spin. The box can sustain a fire for up to four hours which I sincerely hope is enough time for firefighters to put it out. It's probably enough for my purposes as I regularly spread my monthly backups off-site (my parents house, in a locker at work) just in case.

    I should look into DropBox but it's human nature to fix something only after a disaster. On a side note, Malcolm Gladwell's "The Tipping Point" is a great book.

    I choose the simplest backup process, copy to a DVD, because it requires no special software, I can peruse backups simply by popping the DVD into a drive on any computer, do a file comparison between backups and my live copy.
     
  20. Gary Preston

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    For optical media backups or archiving, have a look DVDisaster.

    You provide it with a disk image that is smaller than the disk you plan to burn to e.g 20GB for a 25GB BluRay burn. It then fills up the remaining space with redundancy data. Idea been that if you have 20% worth of redundancy data on the disk, you can have corruption/read errors anywhere on the disk up to 20% and still fully recover all data.

    It also has an option to read an entire disk and verify the data integrity so you can keep an eye on archived media and make a new duplicate once it starts to fail. I burn two copies using this method at the moment (one kept local, one offsite). I'm currently using Plextor Utils to scan the disks for warning signs of failure once or twice per year.
     

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