good iPhone arena shooters?

Discussion in 'Indie Related Chat' started by Pyabo, Jul 21, 2009.

  1. Pyabo

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    Anybody got a recommendation for an arena shooter on iPhone? I already have iDracula. (nice work on that, by the way) Something akin to Geometry Wars maybe?

    Has the shiny-new-excitement worn off yet? Or are you still working on iPhone games? :)

    And when oh when is someone going to actually release a real game controller for this thing? It would be bigger than the DS if Apple released an official one. I think they are being slightly short-sighted.
     
  2. Ordonator

    Ordonator New Member

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    Blue Attack.

    And Blue Defense.

    Well, I like em' :)
     
  3. Teeth

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  4. PoV

    PoV
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    Despite the device above (or the case addon someone is making), the iPhone and iPod line will never feature proper game controls. It's in Apple's best interest to exclusively support the advancement of touch screen tech. Expect simulated tactile responses before an analog nub ever shows up.

    Gaming controls will be what distinguishes future Sony and Nintendo products from the iPhone and Blackberrys.
     
  5. Pyabo

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    Exactly my point! Why let this happen?

    Why do you think it's in Apple's "best interest" to push touch-only? There is no incentive there for them.
     
  6. PoV

    PoV
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    Because Apple is a company of Aesthetics. Their brands are universally knows for it's simplicity. Except for some special cases, you'll almost never see switches and knobs on technology from Star Trek and other far future idealistic Sci-fi. Apple's current image is one of a company bringing practical "space age" products from the future to you today.

    Also, from their perspective, they're getting perfectly good original games and software on a touch-only platform. They were really a nobody in the game industry a little over a year ago, but look at them today. Why change what you're doing to satisfy a few gaming purists?

    Despite what we may think, we are not the mass market for games. The iPhone and iPod are convergence devices with even far more potential than stuff like Wii (being a purely gaming device). There's no legacy to maintain, so it can grow and thrive in crazy ways.
     
  7. Pyabo

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    I think you are underestimating the "gaming purists". There are A LOT of them. If Apple could sell a gaming controller to even 5% of the iPhone owners (which I think is a realistic number), they'd make a bundle... and they are first and foremost a business, driven by the need to make a profit at the end of the day. Pushing the iPhone or iPod touch as a gaming device is only going to increase their sales there, and at the Appstore.

    However, I think you are probably correct in that they're never going to do it.
     
  8. PoV

    PoV
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    I think you're just mistaking them for being noisy, but purists will always be happier with their familiar brands like Sony and Nintendo after all. The iPhone marketplace doesn't do a good job encouraging premium apps with all the 99 cent trending (and everyone accepting it), and a purist will always want more than minigames.

    The one I'm trying to figure out is what the heck will Nintendo be doing 5 years from now. Sony's pretty obvious (giving people what they want), but will Nintendo still be pushing DS series devices by then? The iPhone existing should give Sony the perfect template to create their own successful follow-up device, but Nintendo... will they just keep skewing younger?

    Being the current (?) market leaders, I think the iPhone is a far bigger threat to Nintendo than Sony myself.
     
    #8 PoV, Jul 24, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2009
  9. Pyabo

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    I think we're quickly getting to the point where hardware updates every year or two are pointless. This is especially true for consoles, but also among the handhelds. Which makes me think Nintendo will be pushing the DS for years to come.

    The purists will be play whatever platform gives them the best access to their games in the best form factor. Right now that certainly ISN'T the iPhone. I don't see how they can be a real threat to anyone with their current strategy. Do you really see people thinking "Gee, do I get a Nintendo DSx, a PSPx, or an iPhone? I can't decide!"

    Rumor has it that Microsoft is working on an Xbox-branded handheld... if they combine it with a smartphone that might make the competition interesting.
     
  10. PoV

    PoV
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    For sure, which is especially why you'll not see a replacement for the 360 or PS3 for a number of years. Handhelds are at a bit of a crossroads at the moment though, because there's a very real threat to the old business model.

    Nintendo has introduced the DSi, but it's being sold as a premium system. From the consumer standpoint, if you're in the market for a DSi, you may alternatively be in the market for an iPod touch. We have the iPhone 3GS available today, and likely an iPod touch S in the coming months. Once the market has both products, the handheld gaming landscape is different. Key titles that will demonstrate these differences are still some months away, but it's a very real threat to the public's opinion of handheld gaming.

    Apple is one of the most powerful brands and marketers out there. Watching TV in US and Canada, it's hard not to come across their ads. Once there's a few S series games that demonstrate what shaders bring to the table, there's totally going to be a Apple ads that demo some home console quality graphics on a handheld. The general consumer will see that "wow, that's some pretty sweet gaming graphics, and it's also an iPod".

    The DS's niche has always been that it's "the device" with a touch screen, and the gaming controls were a bonus. It was the touch screen that allowed the device to grow marketshare beyond the traditional gaming stereotypes (recipe books, semi educational). Now introduce a device that does that touch screen thang, looks as good as home console gaming, is an iPod, and is cellphone too (optional)? Also don't forget Apple's branding and marketing power. How can a normal consumer refuse that kind of value proposition?

    The DS and PSP aren't new systems, so worst comes to worst it's a good time for a refresh. I'm concerned about Nintendo though, since their refresh was rather minor. If anything, just created a new pricing tier for their products. Unlike Sony who's a multifaceted company involved in everything from TV's to Cellphones, Nintendo is just a game and IP company. I really don't see them doing a DS Phone. Plenty of arguments could be made how unimportant cellphone functionality is to gaming system, but even if you're a consumer with the cellphone-less version of a system, you're still part of that ecosystem. Apple does both now, and you kinda expect Sony to follow suit in the coming years. The PSP Go is a good first step, but there are more steps to be made. Weather you like it or not, Cellphonisms will soon become a benchmark for handheld gaming. Nintendo is traditionally a company that seems to go against the norm though, which worries me in the long term.
     

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