Gates gives $750m to fight deadly childhood diseases

Discussion in 'Indie Related Chat' started by Nemesis, Jan 25, 2005.

  1. Nemesis

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  2. Anthony Flack

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    Heck, I could probably do one up for you right now:

    $750 million to Bill Gates is like $50 to me, with the difference that all my money was earned legitimately without having to resort to unethical business practices.

    Actually, it's less than that, because it's money he'll never ever use. Whereas I need every $50 I can get.

    Having said that, the end result is still really beneficial so we can be happy about it. And I certainly wouldn't want him to stop giving his money away like this. But before going on about how generous Bill Gates is, consider that he hasn't sacrificed anything at all. It literally makes no difference to him.

    In fact, he's so obscenely wealthy that he's practically obliged to give his money away.
     
  3. Nemesis

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    Assuming Bill's worth in stocks etc. is 29 billion $ (http://evan.quuxuum.org/bgnw.html), he's just given away about 2.5% so I think his 750 milllion $ is more substantial than your $50 if taken in direct proportion.

    Obviously the comparison is pretty meaningless as you said, since his loose change can keep us going for several lifetimes :)

    But it just goes to show that if you're on top and everybody wants a piece of your.. pie.., no philanthropic action is ever going to make you look any better in the eyes of your rivals.
     
  4. Raptisoft

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    I'm surprised anyone still has this attitude, especially you Anthony.

    Would you rather get $50 from me, for $500,000 from Bill Gates? But $50 is MORE from me, man!

    Man, that's a fact. When I was younger, I thought the phrase "no good deed goes unpunished" was a joke, but the older I get, the more I see it not as a cynicaly remark, but as a divine Truth.
     
  5. yanuart

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    well it's never about how much you give.. in my eyes I think that's a good deed and for a good cause, period.

    what about gates ?? i just don't wanna judge a person.. not anymore. There are two ways you can see people in this world, first you see as if everyone r good underneath and the second you see as if everyone are evil.
     
  6. Valen

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    It's that kind of attitude that drove the communist revolution in Russia. The People decided that rich folks don't deserve their money and that it should be distributed equally among everyone. Trouble is that poor people are poor for a reason, and rich people are rich for a reason too (read Robert Kiyosaki's "Rich Dad, Poor Dad"). Thankfully, I live in a country where there's nothing wrong with someone having a lot of money, and where they get to decide what to do with it. I believe the correct name for this strange phenomenon would be "capitalism." :)
     
    #6 Valen, Jan 25, 2005
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2005
  7. BongPig

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    I have a friend who is heavily into helping the AIDs problem in africa. She spends most of her time over there now further educating herself. Certainly one of the good guys who puts in a massive amount of personal effort ( fulltime 24/7 ) to help others.

    She suggested Gates gets a hell of alot done charity wise year in year out. Not just throwing money in, but helping in the right ways. Education. Rebuilding. Health.

    I was suprised.... Shes alot more qualified to know about these things, being on the front-line and seeing the problems for herself.

    Personally, my views regards Billy boy changed from that day.
    ( however, microsoft is a whole other entity! )
     
  8. Nexic

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    Anthony: Lets say you have a house worth $100,000, a car worth $20,000. And say you had another $10,000 in other personal items. To match Bill Gates donation in % terms you would have to donate $3250, not $50.

    I doubt many average people would donate 3 and a half grand to charity.
     
  9. EpicBoy

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    Yes, but it's all about scale. Using your numbers, if you scale that $20,000 car up to Gate's level (the $29 billion quoted earlier), his car would have to be worth:

    $4,461,538,461.00

    ...for this is be truly comparable. Obviously, it isn't.

    Not saying Gates isn't generous - he certainly is. But that truly is pocket change for him...
     
  10. BongPig

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    But we're talking about one payment to one charity. Do you think thats it for 2005 as far as gates is concerned? Do any of you have any real evidence as to how many payments he makes to charity in total? To call it pocketchange is very belittling. Should he give them MORE than they can spend so we can agree hes made a bigger dent on his savings!? ( like thats the point )
    I can understand stamping on Gates for many many reasons. His work in charity isnt one of them. :confused:
     
  11. Abscissa

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    Certainly you're not saying that donating to charity is a *bad* thing if it doesn't involve personal sacrifice, are you?

    The United States is a mixed economy just like most of the world. It just leans closer to the "capatalism" end of the spectrum than most others. If we were a *true* captalist nation, we wouldn't have things like: the antitrust lawsuit against Microsoft, the crackdown on Enron, the FDA, etc.
     
  12. Nexic

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    Whether it is pocket change or not, it still makes him a nice guy - most people dont donate anything to charity at all.
     
  13. EpicBoy

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    I'm not belittling it. I think it's amazing how much he gives to charity. I was just pointing out that trying to scale the money into someone elses money frame of reference wasn't relevant...
     
  14. Bmc

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    I don't think anyone, anywhere would consider 750 million pocket change.
     
  15. GBGames

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    People hate Microsoft, and therefore Bill Gates, for a number of reasons, whether legitimate or not.

    I think it is great they donate money to charity. They have a lot to give, and they do.

    But I always find it funny that there are people who defend Microsoft as "just a successful company" and that everyone is just jealous of their success.

    No one can dispute that they give a lot of money to charity or that this is a good thing. If they do, they are hating just to hate.

    What about their scholarships? Good charity, or a means of locking people into their product? China has a huge piracy rate with Windows, but Microsoft wouldn't dare stop them. If everyone in China uses Windows, when they can pay for software, they will choose to pay for Windows. Similarly with scholarships and their academic versions of their software. You can argue that it is good that they allow people to use computer software on the cheap, but you can also argue that it is just a way to make sure you use their software as opposed to anyone else's.

    When they were called an illegal monopoly, what was being offered? "Yes, you are violating antitrust laws. Give away free copies of your software to further your ability to be a monopoly as punishment." This would be like AT&T being told "You violated antitrust laws, so spread your phone lines to more areas of the country as punishment." You can't deny that this is an outrage.

    Yes, Microsoft gives to charity, and Bill Gates specifically gives a lot to charity. You can't deny this. But there are reasons why people will look first to see what's in it for Microsoft before admitting that there are some good things. For those who think that Microsoft is being unfairly attacked all the time, you are in as much denial about the facts as those who think that Microsoft is just pure evil.

    Some of Microsoft's business practices are legit. Tough, competitive, but legit. People can be upset about these practices, but they can't deny that they are legal without denying the truth of their situations. Other practices, not so much. People do have legitimate gripes with the company, and Bill Gates is just a nice visible target representative of the company.
     
  16. EpicBoy

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    I give up.
     
  17. GBGames

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    Is there an anti-MS movement somewhere? B-)
     
  18. Raptisoft

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    What I found most obscene were the companies who wanted to use their power to get the government to FORCE their competitor to stop competing with them. (Remember, only government can use force... the rest of us have to persuade).
     
  19. GBGames

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    Well it is sad when organizations like the RIAA, MPAA, and BSA use the government to enforce their business practices rather than compete. It is also sad when AOL claims that Netscape was being unfairly pushed out by IE, especially when AOL was one of the reasons why IE was being used more.

    However, the government being used to "force" the company to extend the monopoly would be much worse. It is not even a slap on the hand so much as a reward.

    And software patents also are ways that companies can leverage the government to force others from competing. And yet Bill Gates lets slip that people against software patents are the communists...I guess communists prefer a market where people can compete without government restraints.
     
  20. luggage

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Just before this thread gets closed like the last one :)

    slashdot

    Read some of the replies to the news posting about just the latest donation from the foundation - talk about irrational.

    Why do you all keep saying it's just a few % of his money? He does it year in and year out - surely it's adding up. And hasn't he gone on record saying that when he dies he's leaving 30 million to each of his kids and the rest is to charity?

    boooooo... hisss
     

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