Game idea, need help!

Discussion in 'Development & Distribution' started by GWills, Jul 1, 2010.

  1. GWills

    GWills New Member

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    I am not a game developer, I just have an idea for a new game. I have no idea how to bring this idea to life, if anyone can help, that would be great! I have questions like how do I protect my idea, how do I even get started, etc.
     
  2. jpoag

    jpoag New Member

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    In case you aren't a spammer:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_development

    Pretty much covers the basics.

    Then you learn a particular part of the trade, such as programming or production.

    Next, start networking at GameDev.net, DevMaster.net, indiegamer.com, etc... etc... That will lead to you hiring the missing talent needed to produce your game.

    Buy a lot of books on the subject:

    The Indie Developers' Guide to Selling Games is still relevant if a bit dated.

    Art of Game Design is a good book if you're starting out.

    Don't miss How To Sell Your Game Boot Camp.


    As you read those materials, you'll be able to do Google Searches on keywords and phrases to expand your knowledge, like DRM or Spammer.
     
  3. richtaur

    Indie Author

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    edit: oops, double post, sorry. please ignore :)
     
    #3 richtaur, Jul 1, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2010
  4. richtaur

    Indie Author

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    First you should read these articles: The value of game ideas and Why your game idea sucks.

    Then read this which talks about why execution is more valuable than the idea.

    My advice to you: first understand that everyone has their own ideas, probably dozens of ideas, and they love them more than yours because they are their own. You do not need to protect your idea. If you feel like you do, you do not understand that ideas are not important. Execution is important.

    Share your idea to anyone who will listen, and if you are lucky, you might get some developers who are interested enough to help you. If you keep your idea secret you will probably never execute on it. I'm speaking from ~10 years of experience with keeping ideas secret and never seeing them through to completion.

    Good luck!
     
  5. GWills

    GWills New Member

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    Thank you

    Guess I have a lot of reading to do! Thank you for your input, I'm sure I will have more questions, but in the meantime, I will definately check out the resourses you have provided. Thanks again!
     
  6. Game Producer

    Moderator Original Member

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  7. Nutter2000

    Original Member Indie Author

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    And finally, I suggest you'll get more mileage from this website: http://www.GameDev.net for getting help as they're more focused on the basics.

    Whereas this site is more for people who already run their own game business (to some degree or other) and wouldn't really have time to get involved with other people's projects (unless you could pay industry rates of course ;) ).
     
  8. hippocoder

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    Protecting your idea is simple - release it first.

    Making your game is tougher, and I would look at something like www.unity3d.com to help you make your game for you, but you will still need some form of programming knowledge at some point...

    if you're on a budget and dont mind learning simple basic, then I recommend www.blitzmax.com
     
  9. Spore Man

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    I have a great vision for a big mansion. One like no-one has ever envisioned. It will have a style and features that are just so unique. But...

    - I am not an architect

    - I am not a carpenter

    - I am not an interior designer

    - I am not a landscaper

    - I have no money.

    Who will join me and build this exciting new mansion?
     
  10. Nutter2000

    Original Member Indie Author

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    You left out the "I will retain 90% of the profit because it was my idea" ;)

    Although to be fair not from this guy :)
     
  11. bantamcitygames

    Administrator Original Member Indie Author Greenlit

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    Lock this thread and be done with it :rolleyes:
     
  12. zoombapup

    Moderator Original Member

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    I think it serves as a signpost to all. Or maybe we could bin it.
     
  13. hippocoder

    Indie Author

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    You're just being mean now guys. Are you telling me you didn't once post a post like this? I didn't but back then we didn't have internet faster than a 28 k modem and high rate phone calls ;)
     
  14. Nutter2000

    Original Member Indie Author

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    erm.. nope. But of course back in the early 90s when was 15 or so internet access was still the preserve of the rich or corporations or universities so if you wanted to know that sort of thing you had to figure it out yourself. (Damn I sound old now :eek: )

    I say sticky this thread as a warning to others.
    All hope abandon ye who enter this den of cynics ;)

    Iain
     
  15. Artinum

    Original Member

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    There are two ways.

    (1) Learn to code. If you're tight on budget, it helps to learn to do the graphics, the sound effects, the music, the marketing and the documentation too. This is a slow and difficult option, and there's no guarantee by the time you finish that the end result will (a) sell or (b) be what you first intended.

    (2) Hire programmers, artists, musicians, etc to create your game for you. This will be expensive, results are not guaranteed and marketing is STILL an issue. You can shortcut the entire process by buying Electronic Arts, but this is even more expensive.

    Ever seen "Dragon's Den"? Have you noticed a pattern with those that secure cash and those that don't? The successful ones are *already doing it*. They have a company, they're making sales, they turn a steady profit. Those that just have an idea are doomed to failure. Ideas are worthless on their own - they need to be put into effect.
     
  16. cyodine

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    I agree completely. However, I don't agree with some of the earlier article links that outright just state ideas are worthless, period... or they all suck. Most might be ho-hum but there's always occasional jewels out there that some people might be tempted to "rip-off", at least if the idea was expressed well enough so they could envision it. I mean if Sid Meier spilled all his plans for the Civilization game early on before development of it, I think I could see the vision in it enough to know that it'd probably do well (and I'm sure some people would be tempted to "steal" it). One of the reader comments for one of the articles even mentioned Crayon Physics which had clones popping up even before the creators of the original could finish it... all because they shared with the community their ideas/prototypes/demos before release.

    Ideas = worthless = kind of a slap in the face to me (and probably others) when you spend months trying to build a new, yet fun game mechanic (while discarding numerous attempts) when it would be so much easier just to blatantly clone another design. I have to disagree with what many have said on this forum about it being 'ALL' in the execution. That's fine if all you wanted to do was make another blatant farmville clone to dump on facebook. Having said that you'll probably be better off blatantly copying another design but doing it with superb execution rather than coming up with something original with poor execution, so execution > originality. Yet originality != 0. (I'm also guessing marketing > execution though I'm not entirely sure of this part.)

    I'm not trying to derail this thread with a discussion on the worth of ideas, just trying to chip in my $.02 about not everyone agreeing with the main thesis of the some of the article links.

    EDITED: edited "marketing < execution" to "marketing > execution"
     
    #16 cyodine, Jul 8, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2010
  17. Artinum

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    It is true that some ideas are very good, and these will do well if implemented. The converse is also worth remembering - a mediocre idea, if implemented, will still do pretty well. Not *as* well, but it'll work. Think how many cheap restaurants serve up pub food - it's not just the classy places that make money. Think how well the Twilight books sell - you don't need to write like Dickens to sell novels.

    As General Patton put it, a good plan now is better than a great plan in three weeks. A brilliant idea is still utterly worthless if you're going to sit on it and do nothing. A mediocre idea is easier to come up with, far more common and still brings home the bacon.
     
  18. Nutter2000

    Original Member Indie Author

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    Yeah, I agree.
    It's not that ideas are worthless as such, but ideas only have value once executed well.

    It's a multiplication thing;
    great idea x poor execution = crap result
    poor idea x great execution = crap result
    great idea x great execution = great result

    Probably why game dev is so hard to get right
     

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