Funding and Costs

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by NinaR, May 5, 2011.

  1. NinaR

    NinaR New Member

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    (Audio) Funding and Costs

    Hey guys,

    Not sure if this is the right place to ask but...

    I'm just finishing my undergraduate degree, and I'm applying for funding from the university to make a game. I've got the coding 90% done (10% is waiting for graphics), and I'm doing the art myself.

    So essentially I'm applying for funding for audio (and contemplating commissioning GUI art). Now I know I can buy the sound effects I need for the game for somewhere between £50 and £100 from online royalty free libraries, but I thought it might be nice to have the soundtrack composed by someone, rather than buying stock audio. However, I haven't got the slightest clue what kind of price I'm looking at... £100, £500, £5,000, £50,000? (In US dollars is fine too.)

    It's a fairly simple game: Match-3 with a steampunk/Victorian setting. I thought probably 5 in-game tracks, plus 1 for the front end, and 1 for the conclusion of the game should be enough? I dunno what you think? More, less? I'm hoping to sell on something like BFG... might they have requirements for this?

    Also, are there any other game production aspects, other than design, graphics, audio, and programming that I missed out on? Oh, and QA is sorted as well, I used to work in QA so I've got quite a few friends who want to help with that. :)

    Just wondered if anyone had any advice?

    ~*Nina
     
    #1 NinaR, May 5, 2011
    Last edited: May 9, 2011
  2. Chris England

    Chris England New Member

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    As with anything, prices vary. You can get some extremely people who might do 20 minutes of soundtrack for you for £100, or you might find it costs £5,000. Generally the cheaper guys are less experienced and just using audio mixing software, whereas the higher-end guys are genuinely great composers, but you have to ask yourself whether it's worth the money.

    Best thing to do is find a composing/music forum, and post up a job offering with your critera and rough budget, and see what portfolios come in. You might find someone you like with decent rates, or you might not. There's no harm in trying, though.

    My own two cents is that the money is probably better off spent on art than it is on music, though...
     
  3. loki

    loki Guest

    soundtrack for 5000 pounds? whats that like starcraft soundtrack or something? wow i must really live in a poor country.
    i just wish you spend smartly and dont get ripped off.
     
  4. InfiniteStateMachine

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    I've worked on a project where we've paid 500$ per min of music. Others where in relative terms it's almost pro-bono.

    I should mention he 500$ a min guy has a huge list of AAA commercial games he's done.
     
  5. jcottier

    jcottier New Member

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    I've work on a AAA game were the music costed 80000£.
    BTW, the game has been a failure.

    JC
     
  6. Artinum

    Original Member

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  7. Grey Alien

    Indie Author

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    Hi Nina! Sounds like you've got most aspects covered. You may find that once you start beta testing the game you'll have to make a number of tweaks based on the feedback that will expand your final 10% of code :)

    As for musicians, some pros charge fees like $400 a minute and you'll need about 7 minutes: 5x 1 min for game tracks, 1 min for title, 15-30 seconds for level complete reward music (I do this in my games anyway), remainder for game finished/credits music. You may well find someone who will work for less money or part royalties, but it helps to have a track record of making successful games to convince people to work for royalties. I've personally never paid anywhere near that much for music as for my early games I used free library music, my own and some from a friend, but that wouldn't cut it these days. Later games I worked with a musician friend in Holland, and the games I made for BFG used music by Somatone which was probably expensive.

    Good luck with the game, I look forward to seeing it!
     
  8. Nexic

    Indie Author

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    You can find fairly decent musicians who will work for around $40/minute. Also worth checking out stock music, you can get some really awesome stuff for a low price if you look hard enough.
     
  9. loki

    loki Guest

    i though we were indies wow. if i had that money to spare on a soundtrack i wouldnt make indie games, i would OWN a big company or open a cafe.
     
  10. Nexic

    Indie Author

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    A big company doing what? And... a cafe? Proven money spinners they are. :rolleyes:
     
  11. electronicStar

    Original Member

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    Marketing and selling?
    Start thinking beyond just submitting to BFG
     
  12. Desktop Gaming

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Not ZooDigital by any chance?
     
  13. NinaR

    NinaR New Member

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    Hey guys,

    Thanks all so much for your responses! I'm sorry I kinda dropped off the planet for a bit there! There was such much going on in my life all at once!

    Anyway... as far as the game goes... I ended up working with a friend of a friend - very talented guy with no prior (games) experience - but someone I know I get on with and can work within my means. :) That was because, after reading your responses, I figured that looking a bit closer to home would probably result in the best working relationship. $500 per minute of music is not the stage that I'm at. :) I think it's really fascinating that there's such a variance in this... I assume the same can be said for other (creative) aspects of game development - eg. art?

    Also, it seems from your responses that music is generally changed per minute! Never knew that, but I guess it makes sense! :D

    @Chris England
    Thanks for your advice. Also, I agree with the money better spent on art bit, but the thing is that I can make the art assets myself, whereas I can't make the music myself. If I was "average" at everything, I'd definitely invest in art more. But my music skills are completely nonexistent. :)

    That's very interesting to hear. Was that $500 per minute of actual recorded music?

    Thanks for the recommendation! :D

    @Grey Alien
    Thanks for the information and advice! It's good to hear how other (more experienced) people have approached this issue.

    @Nexic
    I have looked through a lot of stock music, but it rarely seems like the sort of thing I'm looking for. Are there any sites in particular that you'd recommend? Or other (non-internet) sources?

    @electronicStar
    Hehehe... I never thought to look into marketing and selling until after I finish developing, but I guess having some idea of how to promote the game is probably more important that I think. Especially since there's absolutely no guarantee any portal of any kind will accept it or spend any kind of time promoting it. :)

    @Desktop Gaming
    Nope, it wasn't ZooDigital. ;)

    Thanks again guys! I really appreciate that you took the time to respond!!

    ~*Nina
     
    #13 NinaR, Aug 8, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 20, 2015

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