free tool

Discussion in 'Game Development (Technical)' started by Slayerizer, Jan 24, 2007.

  1. Slayerizer

    Original Member

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    It's not really related to game programming but it may be useful to you since development tools (devStudio, 3dsmax, audition, photoshop) are memory hungry.

    I've created an utility which free ram (no spyware and 250k in size) which does a very good job.

    download link
    [​IMG]

    If you want to be impressed, open your task manager prior to running the tool and sort the processes by memory usage (biggest memory usage at the top).

    Do a print screen and put that in wordpad. Fire up RamFree and see the difference.
     
  2. mot

    mot
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    I once read an interview with a Windows kernel developer who said these tools are completely useless. There is no RAM to be "freed" in your system. You can invalidate some buffers or disk cache to make it look like there's suddenly more memory available but it actually has negative impact on performance and the memory resident program eats up resources as well.

    I don't want to sound offensive, just a little skeptical maybe.
     
    #2 mot, Jan 24, 2007
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2007
  3. Slayerizer

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    thanks for the information, I was unaware of this article. I wasn't able to read it since I'm not subscribed but I found this link instead. I will remove my program from my web site.

    Sorry
     
  4. mot

    mot
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    No need for you to apologize, I was rude, sorry. It's just that it's so nice to look at the red/green free ram bars but unless somebody explains to me what it means and what good things it means for the performance of my PC, the only information I have is from that kernel dev. interview which basically said what I wrote before - no point using such tools.
    If you've build one that actually works, great. Just back it up with some benchmarks and voila.
     
  5. Slayerizer

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    well in theory, it's not that the concept of the ram optimizer is bad. From a technical point, it just seems right. I think I will repost my tool since I think it could still be useful when used correctly.

    From what I've found, Windows deliberately assign more memory to an application when there is plenty of memory available. When you minimize an application, the memory working set, is set to the bare minimum. Ram optimizer softwares are doing the same thing on a permanent basis. This is not a bad thing, since Windows does the same when you minimize an application. The bad thing is when you set the optimizer to flush the working set every 5 or 10 seconds. I doubt that optimizing memory every five minutes would be harmful.

    I think that the optimization should be done only prior to launching a new application. That way, the allocated, but not used memory, would be available to the new started application (or game).

    Either way, it's still hard to measure performance gains.
     

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