For a Beginner

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by kaz_1994, Apr 14, 2009.

  1. kaz_1994

    kaz_1994 New Member

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    Hello everyone,

    I am currently trying to get into the indie business and was wondering about how to get started. I know there are many different forums and website about this but I would rather have a answer from indie game developers. I was mainly wondering about these two topics:

    Game design – how much is to much for a first game? For example I want to make a 2d action game. The camera would be from a birds eye view (like in the pokemon games) and it would only take about a hour to beat the game. Is that still to big?

    Video game art- any good sprite animation tools? Any advice on how to get decent 2d graphics without paying too much?


    Thank you for your time, I hope to get some feedback soon

    Best regards,
    Kaz Campbell
     
  2. JGOware

    Indie Author

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    Have you developed any games at all yet?
    What language do you program in?
     
  3. Acord

    Acord New Member

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    You have to be able to do *something*. Being the idea guy is a dead end trip. So buff your art, or your coding, or something.
     
  4. Richard Nunes

    Richard Nunes New Member

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    It's not the length of the game but it's complexity. You can write a match-three game with 1000 levels because a match-three may not be a particularly hard game to write.

    So, you want to make a game like Pokemon? As a newcomer, a simple batttle game is definately possible.
     
  5. kaz_1994

    kaz_1994 New Member

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    well i frogot to mention i do have computer art skills. and i can write some c & c++
     
  6. Acord

    Acord New Member

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    Excellent. In that case - I'd recommend something like MMF or Gamemaker to start with - not because I think you're a dumb n00b or anything, but because it is infinitely faster to prototype concepts in one of these two programs. Put it in, tweak it, play with it, and when you're happy with the way that one concept works, move to the next.

    Gamemaker is $20. Can't vouch for the latest version of MMF since I haven't used it yet, but the old one was pretty decent once it got debugged.

    Once you've got all of the concepts down, writing out the logic/pseudocode to move it into something beefier is relatively quick and painless. You'll also know exactly what you want right off the bat, instead of playing with the code, recompiling it, debugging it, repeat ad nauseum.
     
  7. kaz_1994

    kaz_1994 New Member

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    Well i like the idea of that but i think i can do better. i am not interested in using game makers agian. i have used the game makers in the past and did not enjoy building games in it. although if i were to make a game in the MMF software which piece of software should i choose
     
    #7 kaz_1994, Apr 15, 2009
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2009
  8. Richard Nunes

    Richard Nunes New Member

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    Torque Game Builder is another option. You'll either love it or hate it; several debates on these forums in the past.
     
  9. kaz_1994

    kaz_1994 New Member

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    ah... i am already familiar with the tourqe 2d stuff.
     
  10. Acord

    Acord New Member

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    Unless you want to plonk down a very large amount of cash to buy the source code so you can fix all the bugs, don't bother with TGB.

    Large starting out, anyhoo.
     
  11. unconnected

    Original Member

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    Start very very very small and work your way up from there.. Your first goal above anything else should simply be to finish your first game, have something to show for yourself.

    Design isn't important at all for your first game, just finishing the damn thing is. Work on your technical skills and then slowly integrate more and more design aspects into your games.
     
  12. Merx

    Indie Author

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    Check out the Ludum Dare competition...

    Ludum Dare they regularly do a 48hr game development challenge, all entrants post their code as well so it's a great plance to get ideas and sharpen your prototype development skills!
     
  13. Senior

    Senior New Member

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    gamedev tool

    Try Gamestudio; I have used it without problems for several years. The programming language is similar to C, but easier.

    http://www.3dgamestudio.com
     
  14. mirosurabu

    mirosurabu New Member

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    What kind of games you've done before?
    What kind of tools you want to use - that is to say, do you want to be a programmer or designer or both?

    There are some free generic tools you should use in order to learn how to design and prototype games. These are Game Maker Lite Edition and Construct (google 'scirra construct'). They may not necessarily help you improve your programming skills, but they may help you learn how to design games.

    If you want to be a programmer and not necessarily designer, then start with Python or C#. These are easy to use and there are plenty of third-part libraries for them to make your every-day coding easier.
     
  15. Lord_Garland

    Lord_Garland New Member

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    I think the best place to start might be with flash games. You can make some real money at it. Join www.flashgamelicense.com/

    After making a few flash games you can move on to download games.



    Good luck.
     
  16. puddinlover

    puddinlover New Member

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    I was looking at the site Lord_Garland and was wondering if anyone here had any first-hand experience with it?

    I hopped in the chat the other day and it seemed like a decent place. I was told 1/3rd of the community is buyers which seems like a great ratio.
     
  17. strikethetrip

    strikethetrip New Member

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    A friend of mine recommended Director (I hear the language, "Limbo", is akin to programming flash). Do you guys have any experience with that?
     
  18. Backov

    Original Member

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    It's "Lingo", and it's kind of weird. I wouldn't bother myself - go for Flash if you want to do browser games, or something like BlitzMax or whatever for desktop games.

    Director was big about 10 years ago, but it's a really really dark horse these days. You'd be better off going with just about anything but Director.
     
  19. puddinlover

    puddinlover New Member

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    If your brand new and just want to see your ideas come to life fast than you might wanna try GameMaker (they have a free copy) but really the key is to not use too many of their drag and drop events... learn their scripting language which will introduce you to some basic logic that will transfer into learning other languages. GML (game maker language) is actually very easy to do if you have any type of programming experience.

    Another option if you want to have more control over your game would be PyGame but it is not as user friendly though. Still easier than coding your own engine in c++ or something.

    (Just make sure you don't get stuck on the 'drag n drop' type development. Sooner or later you will find yourself needing more control over your games than that simple engine can offer so if you plan to make indie games your life one day it might be wise to learn also a real programming language too or even design to some point (pixel art or 3d modeling). Either way I wish you luck with your journey!)
     
  20. aiursrage2k

    Original Member

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    Before starting you want to be able to prototype as quickly as possible, so having a game engine will save you a lot of time. During the prototyping phase you want to determine if the game is "good" or should it be "canned", the quicker this is done the better. Its important to convey this to the rest of the team, be it artists, programmers, musicians or whatever. If you have any artists make sure they use low poly versions (you dont want them spending a week on something if you are going to throw it away). If you have a game designer he better be willing to drop the idea as well (you would think they would be the most willing to but they seem the least willing). Before doing anything you should work on game design document, ensuring that the gameplay is good enough to warrant doing the game (if there is no gameplay there is no game).

    The good thing about an engine like Torque is that allows you to prototype quickly and hit the major platforms (windows, mac, linux, xbox etc)... the obvious problem happens if you hit a limitation.
     
    #20 aiursrage2k, May 31, 2009
    Last edited: May 31, 2009

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