Excellent Photoshop Tutorial: Space

Discussion in 'Game Development (Technical)' started by soniCron, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. soniCron

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    3,664
    Likes Received:
    0
  2. Reanimated

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    0
    Very nice, thanks soniCron!
     
  3. soniCron

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    3,664
    Likes Received:
    0
    Oh, no! The thanks lies soley on Greg! I had no idea that these beautiful paintings of space were so easy to make! Conceptualized space is my #1 favorite visual theme, so I've yearned to make these majestic pieces that see throughout the Internet. And now I can! Many thanks to Greg!!
     
  4. GBGames

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,255
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nice image! Two hours, eh?

    Thanks for the link!
     
  5. siread

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2004
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nice work soniCron. Gotta be worth two hours of my time.
     
  6. Drakkheim

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nice bit o work!
     
  7. wazoo

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    0
    Definitely checking this out!

    Thanks for passing that link on @soniCron! Outstanding stuff that I hope to use..
     
  8. Sharpfish

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2005
    Messages:
    1,309
    Likes Received:
    0
    Looks great, I'll definitely be partaking when I get time. :)
     
  9. Russell Fincher

    Original Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Very nice! For a less dazzing but quicker way to make planets and starfields, there are the Flaming Pear Photoshop plugins Lunar Cell and Glitterato, both with full-functioning 30-day demos.

    Yours still looks way better to me though! :)
     
  10. soniCron

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    3,664
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well, mine was crafted by hand, so I had full control over the composition of the image. I was able to give the scene a "story," and apply that story as I crafted the image. (For example, did you know that one day on Solaris is equal to one year on Solaris? This is why one side is a burnt desert: It's been facing the sun for millions of years!) Until a software program is able to come up with and render these details, then hand-drawn will still be better. However, those are some excellent links you posted, and they'd be ideal for filling in the spaces! (No pun intended! ;))

    I'm really anxious to see some of your creations, everyone! Why not post up your spacy images for us all to see! I know many of us would appreciate that!
     
  11. Andy

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    Messages:
    1,258
    Likes Received:
    0
    If one wouldn't like to attack me and all our games so often, so stupid without any reason he probably could look at some of them and notice that there are amount of spacy images in there and appreciate that... :D
     
  12. Savant

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2005
    Messages:
    1,674
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yeah, it really sucks when people lash out and attack others for no apparent reason. :rolleyes:
     
  13. TheMysteriousStranger

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2006
    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    0
    They are some rather nice tutorials that show you how to do things like this.

    I suddenly feel the urge to make my next game space themed...
     
  14. soniCron

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    3,664
    Likes Received:
    0
    *laughs* No kidding! And great scene you made! :)

    And now we've got the ball rolling, let's see some others from you all!
     
  15. Gnatinator

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2004
    Messages:
    357
    Likes Received:
    0
    Greg Martin is awesome, these tutorials are awesome.

    I remember using this exact one to do the rotating starfield background for Outer-Rim Pod Digger. Sure spruced up the title screen! :)

    Unfortunately my next title isn't a spacey themed game...
     
  16. Andy

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    Messages:
    1,258
    Likes Received:
    0
  17. Sega

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2005
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    Do you mind sharing links to those tutorials? This looks like it uses a slightly different technique from the one posted in the initial message.

    But maybe it's the same technique with different art styles. Either way, if there are other tutorials, I'd kinda like to see their take on creating the same type of image.
     
    #17 Sega, Jan 26, 2006
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2006
  18. soniCron

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    3,664
    Likes Received:
    0
    I could be wrong, but I suspect it's the same tutorial. The image size is 500x500, which is specified in the above tutorials. I noticed that too, however. It appears he just used a different texture to paint with.
     
  19. TheMysteriousStranger

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2006
    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    0
    Same tutorial as linked above. And soniCron - it was the same texture provided in the tutorial. Did you use a different texture for yours? Or did you just go around afterwards and edit in the details by hand?

    And soni - how did you make those clouds look so 3-dimensional on yours? Mine look so flat and dull :(
     
  20. soniCron

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    3,664
    Likes Received:
    0
    Interesting. I used the same texture as you.

    Clouds
    • I created another layer and filled it black.
    • I then loaded the planet layer as the selection and proceded to paint with white and a huge textured brush. (Just like we had done in the very beginning, minus the shading.)
    • I ended up with a big circle of grayscale texture.
    • I deselected everything and used "Select Color Range" with a low threshold to select an interesting pattern on the disc.
    • I deleted that layer, created a new layer, and filled my selection white.
    • Next, I scaled this layer by 105%. (I tried 110%, but it was too much.)
    • I erased the bottom right to "shade" it.
    • I added Photoshop's "Bevel/Emboss" blending option with a very large, soft, and low contrast setting. (This has to be barely noticable, or it'll look heinously stupid. Also, this is hardly realistic -- clouds are seldom textured enough to even have a shaded edge that can be seen from space -- but I thought it added a lot of character to the scene.)
    • Finally, I duplicated the layer, moved it under the original layer, and turned it black.
    • Next, I freeform scale and deformed it (toward the bottom right) so that it would cast a close shadow close to the top left edge of the planet, but it would stretch across the planet the further from the sun it was. (Think of what shadows look like during different times in the day. Emulate that.)
    • Then I turned down the shadow's opacity to somewhere around 3% or 5%, I believe.
    • And, as the slightest touch, adjust that cloud shadow layer so it fills in with just a touch of blue, as the light we do see in a daylight shadow is reflected off the atmosphere, and thus daylight shadows are slightly tinted blue.

    I must say, I didn't realize those were clouds when I first looked at your image. I thought it was an ice sheet, or perhaps gray land. It looks like you just desaturated it there. What did you do to make the clouds?
     

Share This Page

  • About Indie Gamer

    When the original Dexterity Forums closed in 2004, Indie Gamer was born and a diverse community has grown out of a passion for creating great games. Here you will find over 10 years of in-depth discussion on game design, the business of game development, and marketing/sales. Indie Gamer also provides a friendly place to meet up with other Developers, Artists, Composers and Writers.
  • Buy us a beer!

    Indie Gamer is delicately held together by a single poor bastard who thankfully gets help from various community volunteers. If you frequent this site or have found value in something you've learned here, help keep the site running by donating a few dollars (for beer of course)!

    Sure, I'll Buy You a Beer