DX 9 and OpenGL support good enough ? Also any one used the OGRE engine ?

Discussion in 'Game Development (Technical)' started by MrMark, Nov 23, 2006.

  1. MrMark

    MrMark New Member

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    I'm thinking about using OGRE3D (http://www.ogre3d.org/) to create my first game. Its LGPL so it's free, has just about all the features you could possibility ask for in a graphics engine, 5 year's old so its nice and mature, and has had a few retail games made with it so it must be good. Ogre dropped DX 7 & 8 support earlier this year 'cause DX 9 is what 5 year's old now (came default on XP) and you've also got OpenGL to fall back on. But I've been reading on this forum that some older computers (like the ones that wouldn't have DX 9) have really shitty Open GL support :eek: I'm thinking of writing a 3D break out game, or maybe a 2.5D platformer, which is a reasonably casual sort of game.

    So supporting only DX9 and OpenGL has me a little bit worried, should I be ? OGRE is cross platform however, Windows/Mac/Linux so even if I lose the really old computers that don't have proper OpenGL support, the Mac/Linux support should counteract that yeah ?

    Complied OGRE is about 9 meg - just for the graphic's, which might be a bit too big for a casual/portal game, what do you guys think ?
     
  2. PoV

    PoV
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    If it's your first game, then I'd recommend it, 'cause it'll give you a certain degree of freedom, and let you toy with shaders if you're up to it. If you actually plan to sell it, you should put a lot more thought in to it than Breakout or Platformer, else you'll be gravely dissapointed. Just 'cause there are a million breakout's, doesn't mean they're actually profitable. Enjoy what you do, make what you want to make, just keep it simple so you can finish. Talk money later.
     
  3. Nutter2000

    Original Member Indie Author

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    I've used OGRE but not for anything commercial as yet.

    I think that's not quite right, iirc Windows XP originally shipped with DX 8.1 when it was released back in October 2001, I think it was Service Pack 2 that came with DX9 although it was obviously available through the windows updates. DX9 originally came out in December 2002, still a long enough time ago :p

    Yes a lot of cheaper gfx cards didn't ship with decent OGL drivers I think that's because majority of PCs run Windows and the majority of games primarily use or at least support DirectX so why bother going through all the hastle and cost of testing proper openGL support when potentially only a minority of their customers will use it. (Sorry to all the OGL guys here, just looking at it from the manufacturers point of view ;)).
    I think that's changing now though, but I could be wrong.

    If you want to fully support cross-platform then supporting both DX and OGL is a must really.

    Also my Ogre release dlls are only 5Mb and zip down to about 2Mb and that includes the plugins and required dlls like DevIL so I'm not sure what you're including in your 9Mb there!

    But having said all that I think OGRE is a bit high powered for your requirements. It's more of a full on 3D gfx engine so not really designed for portals in my opinion, I'm not sure what the requirements are for portals at the moment I'm sure someone else can tell you.
     
  4. voxel

    voxel New Member

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    I really like OGRE. It has some bloat that isn't always nicely separated, but the tool exporters are great - all the major packages have pretty solid support.

    It's only a graphics engine - you'll need OIS and FMOD and other 3rd party libs too. Personally, I don't recommend it if this is your very first game. The default ExampleFramework is quite useless and if you've never created a game before you wouldn't know how to design a proper game loop + state system.
     
  5. Slayerizer

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    have you checked Irrlicht?

    I found it easy to use and it supports DX8.1, DX9, opengl + 2 software renderers.
     
  6. MacMan45

    MacMan45 New Member

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    As I have surely told you by now Mark, Ogre is a great graphics engine!

    Like others have said though, do not base anything serious on example application, they are quick launching tools to learn the engine from.
    Also don't be tempted to use their example input, they don't recommend it & they are actually switching to OIS in a future release as well.

    Either way, I have been using Ogre since 2003 & have never looked back, I always cringe when I have to go back to basics, back to DX or OGL!
     
  7. MrMark

    MrMark New Member

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    Thanks for your replies
    Oh so it is :eek: I was looking at the debug bulid :p

    Okay, sorry should of been a bit clearer. This isn't my first attempt at cobbling together a engine. For uni I wrote a Direct X engine (D3D, DInput, DSound) that works okayish but has a few bugs, memory leaks, and a very basic break out style game using that engine. I learnt a lot in doing so, but I don't want to spent the effort developing my own engine, because I now have an absolute hatred for DX - very icky API, and there's other really nice alternatives out there.


    My full libary list is gonna be something like:

    OGRE, OIS, OpenAL, and Newton or ODE, not sure which physic engine I like yet.
     
    #7 MrMark, Nov 24, 2006
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2006
  8. Nutter2000

    Original Member Indie Author

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    lol, figured it was something like that ;)

    DirectX isn't so bad these days, I still prefer to work with a wrapper or engine for it though, back in DX 1 - 3 days it was truely hateful.

    Personally I've been working on a framework on and off over the past few years, the idea being that each area is essentially a plugin so that you can easily switch components, such as 3D engine, physics, audio, networking, scripting, etc. It's a lot of work but I think it's worth it, for example, I switched from openAL to FMod for audio when I found that OAL was crashing on loads of basic AC'97 chipsets and it only took a morning work to write the adapter dll.

    Hmm.. last time I looked at Irrlicht it was still in beta. It's looking at lot better now, have you had much experience with it?

    Iain
     
  9. Brian A. Knudsen

    Brian A. Knudsen New Member

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    i suggest to use simple glut setup (no engine) and try out ideas without fancy libs and then find your needs from there.

    I'd like to know what car i want before i go out and pick the most fancy one. Furthermore your restricted by the imagination of designers of your libs. If your game is rts or you game is 2d or something else which the engine might not be intended for you might have a engien that works, but your still máking a plane out of a bus.

    You _CAN_ make a bus fly, given enough thrust, but its not hte most genious of ideas :eek:)

    I work in OGL but have had excellent experiences with eg. GameMaker 6.
     
  10. Slayerizer

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    I created small programs with it but nothing worth a talk. I used it but I was more interested on working on my own engine. Right now I'm playing with XNA (some vids on my site)
     

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