do you wanna be famous?

Discussion in 'Indie Related Chat' started by NothingLikeit, Feb 25, 2006.

  1. NothingLikeit

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    It's funny that you mention American Mcgee. When I read "Masters of Doom" I realized that recognition and fame can go wrong if it goes to your head. In the case of John Romero and American Mcgee (Who I really didn't know who he was until I read the booK) was that the fame went to thier heads. I think it's a problem if you spend more time being a media darling than actually doing your work.

    I also think it's wrong for only the designer to take credit for the game. Honestly John Romero would have been just another guy with John Carmack's engines. There's got to be a better way to give the whole team recognition as talent instead of just thinking of them as a drone doing a factory like job.

    All bias aside indie studios have a better chance of being recognized as individuals. Thinking back to the people I heard of: Alex Seropian, Sid Meier, Peter Moloneyeux, etc. They all started off as hobbyist developers.
     
  2. soniCron

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    Do you feel the same way about labeling movies with their directors? Or actors? Do folks in the film industry feel bad about that?
     
  3. Anthony Flack

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    I think it's probably a good thing for one person to "take the credit" if that person is ultimately responsible for the direction and quality of the end product (it's also important that that person be given that responsibility). Or perhaps two or three people, such as the people in charge of art and music, under the direction of the person in charge of the lot. Yes, there will be many talented people working in the studio, but the person in charge has a responsibility to ensure that there are talented people working in the studio, and that everyone is working together and producing high-quality work.

    This person is ultimately responsible if the project comes out crap, too.

    That has to be better than just having the publisher take all the credit at any rate.
     
  4. NothingLikeit

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    No I don't feel the same away about the film industry. I'm not saying that every team member's name has to be on the game box. I'm sure the gaffer from The Matrix doesn't care or even thinks his name should be on the movie poster. (Do they put stuff like that on there?)
     
  5. Steve Ince

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    All games have a list of credits where everyone who's worked on the game is credited with their contribution, which is right and fair. However, if a single individual owns the IP and has the vision to bring a game to market by pulling the right team together, then it seems just to me that this person be recognised as such and the game be considered "theirs".

    If a game is the joint vision of a number of individuals, then the game should really be deemed to "belong" to the company they (presumably) share.

    What annoys me most is when development studios don't even get the recognition they deserve on the box cover and must sometimes fight just to get their company logo on the front. I believe that some publishers actively do this so that people will think that they developed the game and know of one instance where this led a minor award being given to the publisher instead of the developer.
     
  6. mahlzeit

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    As far as the "A FILM BY ALAN SMITHEE" possessory credit goes, not everyone is happy about that. It works as far as marketing is concerned, but it is a little unfair to everyone else who worked their butts off on the project.
     
  7. Steve Ince

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    But would there have been a film for them to work their butts off on if Alan Smithee hadn't been there to "make" it?
     
  8. mahlzeit

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    Maybe this is going a little off-topic, but often directors are not the ones initiating projects. (Disclaimer: I am not really in the film industry.)
     
  9. Fry Crayola

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    Keeping with the film theme for a second, the people who typically get their name on it are the "artists" involved - the director, the actors, the writers and in certain genres the FX team. The people doing mostly technical work are never billed. Aside from the advertising reasons (people don't pay money to see a cameraman at work, whoever he may be) it's mainly down to a lack of influence. The directors, actors, writers etc. do the legwork and it's the technical guys who carry that out.

    In that respect, games are similar in that there are a number of people with a large amount of creative input and they delegate a lot of technical (and certainly highly skilled) work to other members of the team, all of whom contribute to the game but few of whom influence the style of the main product. They can't take a bad design and turn it into something great, just as a member of an orchestra can't make an atrocious piece of music sound like a tune from heaven, which is why the big credits go to the guys who come up with the good designs in the first place. They're certainly not ten-a-penny and there's little credit in copycat works.

    Of course, a game ought to clearly credit everyone involved in the credits list, but top billing, name-on-the-packaging should go to the creative minds.
     
  10. NothingLikeit

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    Do you all think that a designer will ever get interviewed by the press or late night talk shows?
     
  11. Game Producer

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    Maybe it's a country dependent thing... but I would like Finland to be more famous (rather than I - if I had to pick one). And the darn team went and LOST the ice hockey final match to Sweden... argh the pain...
     
  12. NuriumGames

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    Me too! ........ (must reach 10 chars to post)
     
  13. jankoM

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    I just want me, my wife and my kid that will be poping up soon to live in our own house. If I have to get famous to get to the house, so be it.:eek:
     
    #53 jankoM, Feb 27, 2006
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2006
  14. jetro

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    Well, I have got a glimpse of what it's like being famous.. being developer of the widely distributed Dismount games. So many gamers and developers recognize my games and some start to act weird when they hear that I'm the guy behind those. It's really strange to have somebody suddenly literally bow before you, or ask for autograph, especially if you're slightly shy like me. Luckily those situations are rare enough.. but shows that while it is nice being recognized, it'd probably suck to be something like a rock star.
     
  15. NothingLikeit

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    Hey Finland's been getting a ton of Hype from Conan O'Brien lately. Is it true that people watch his show that much over there?
     
  16. mindor

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    Though I have seen Tiger Woods on Jay Leno, or Conan O'brien pushing the latest golf game that had his name attached to it; I think it would be unlikly for a designer to end up on a late night talk show. For this to happen (s)he would probably have to have some other claim to fame as well, or they would have to be responsible for something that the mainstream took a great interest in.

    I would be surprised if local press didn't at least request interviews from designers of successful games. Newspapers are always doing interest pieces with local businesses, or authors when they have a new project. I would think this would fall under the same catagory.

    As far as wanting fame goes: I would like to be well known and respected for what I do, by those that understand what I do. I would also love to gain a following that got excited when I announced a new project. I wouldn't like to be recognised everywhere I go. That happens too much now as it is, and I'm just the helpful guy at a local drug store.
    If I ever ended up on the Tonight Show, I'd just make a big fool of myself.
     
  17. Mr.Blaub

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    I think games will be brought further into the lives of the masses through the casual game market. Triple A games have become far too insular to anyone who doesn't play games for four hours a day. Casual games have the potential to create hollywood-esque hype, because after all games are art too.

    As soon as people recognise this, and it becomes more socially acceptible to whittle away the free time with a casual game, we'll have our limelight.

    Having typed that, I would welcome mainstream success, but a cult fandom. A hard core of dedicated fans who loved my games because they meant something to them. I expect many niche developers to have their dedicated fans. The likes of point and click adventures, space shooters and other genres of game which are no longer widely commercially viable.

    This way you get plenty of money and recognition from fans who actually count, the people who like your game because it's good.

    Here's another route to stardom - make yourself look like you know what you're talking about. I didn't know Chris Crawford existed until in 2005 I downloaded his Trust and Betrayal game. I hadn't heard of any of his other games, but he's written a couple of books and he's very outspoken about game design. That's what's made him famous (in the realm of game design at least).

    That and he pulled a crazy stunt involving a quote from Don Quixote at some point ;)
     
  18. Andy

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    I've already tired to answer the requests for interview from different media to Alexey Pajitnov. Explaining that we have no any influence on Alexey in his decisions to give or not to give the interviews.

    But holly sh... how many such requests we get!!! :)
    So I'd guess YES, this is possible in general... ;)

    EDIT: Spell checked the message for Gabriel... ;)
     
  19. Anthony Flack

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    Yeah, just like you'd all recognise the people who invented Trivial Pursuit, right? Or was it just one person? Whatever. Who cares!
     
  20. Chris Evans

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    Except for the fact that portals and publishers try their best to hide who actually DEVELOPS the games. When you look at a game page on a portal or a retail game box, often times you have to be a super sleuth to find out how made the game.

    Unlike movies, game publishers/portals do not promote (or barely mention) the creative talent behind the games. Over the past 25 years in retail, a few personalities have emerged but I still don't think a single game designer could get on Leno or David Letterman. David Perry might be able to squeeze in on one of those Late Late Shows at 2:57am right before the infomercials start but that'd still be pushing it.

    Jason Rubin went on a big rant about this at GDC a couple of years back about how Publishers shove their talent to the broom closet even at game launch parties.

    I'd say console games (PS2, Xbox, and etc) are pretty mainstream right now yet there still isn't one game designer who's close to being a household name. So I wouldn't hold your breath about getting in the limelight with casual games even if it hits critical mass.

    As a game designer, I think this best you can hope for (in terms of fame) is to have a cult following and the respect of peers. That's fine by me.
     

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