'Deprecated' carbon functions on Mac

Discussion in 'Game Development (Technical)' started by manicmilkman, Feb 12, 2010.

  1. manicmilkman

    manicmilkman New Member

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    I'm making slow but steady progress on porting my game to the Mac. I actually use a Macbook pro quite a bit but with Boot camp so the Mac APIs are all new to me.

    I'm working with pure C and Carbon, and although I have things working alot of the functions I want to use are declared 'deprecated' in big red letters on Apple Developer Center. What gets me is there is no link that says 'use >this< instead.' (although in some cases I can find what I expect to be equivilant.)

    How much of a worry is this? Does deprecated here mean the calls are likely to fail in the next OS release...or further in the future? Or are likely to be supported but newer methods are preferred...
     
  2. lobotony

    lobotony New Member

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_(API)

    Here's an example of a NIB-less Cocoa Application:
    http://books.google.com/books?id=Cn...=onepage&q="tiny.m" cocoa application&f=false

    or here

    http://www.cocoabuilder.com/archive/cocoa/179958-minimal-cocoa-application.html

    You should be fine (i.e. not deprecated) if you use the Cocoa portion of the APIs (NSWindow, NSView etc.), Core* (CoreGraphics, Core Foundation etc.) , OpenGL etc.
    I don't think they'll axe Carbon too quickly, even if it's only for Photoshop, but you never know with Apple. Also, there's no Carbon on the iPhone.
     
  3. manicmilkman

    manicmilkman New Member

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