CrazyEgg.com - Detecting where folks are hitting on your site

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by wazoo, Dec 4, 2006.

  1. wazoo

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    0
    This one was passed to me by some other "Web2.0" friends of mine, but it's GOD-LIKE.

    http://www.crazyegg.com

    It generates an image of the webpage you want tracked, and it creates a "heatmap" that uses AJAX to follow where on the page people are clicking...

    enjoy!
     
  2. soniCron

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    3,664
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't want to say this is unimpressive, because it's not, but this kind of thing has been around for a few years, now. Google Analytics has a less-impressive version built-in, for example. And, actually, the really valuable thing would be to monitor where their eyes are on the page...
     
  3. KNau

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    Messages:
    1,165
    Likes Received:
    2
    If people are clicking links then isn't that easily trackable through normal traffic details? Through standard web stats I can already see what links are being clicked, how often and even the amount of average time spent on a page. I've been trying to understand this service - what other than a cool graphic does Crazy Egg offer that isn't already available through standard analytics?
     
  4. Phil Newton

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2004
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    0
    I haven't used Crazy Egg that much, but I think one of the features is the ability to track "split testing", which is something that can really help improve your site. The heatmaps certainly helped me to improve a few things, but as KNau said it is something that could be done with a standard log analyser, although I can't think of any that actually do it.
     
  5. DFG

    DFG
    Original Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    547
    Likes Received:
    1
    I thought heat maps tracked cursor movement....if so, you couldn't get that from log files.
     
  6. Phil Newton

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2004
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    0
    They do track the x/y position of the mouse when a click is made, but not movement.

    The main advantage of using Crazy Egg for this is that you can see exactly which link was clicked, and where. For example, if you have a "Buy now" link at the top and bottom of the page, I don't think you can tell which one was pressed just from looking at server logs.
     
  7. Andy

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    Messages:
    1,258
    Likes Received:
    0
    Kyle,

    Good representation of data costs a lot really. (Don't know if that egg the case really). Just imagine how the games would look being delivered as a code only. Or what would you see on TV if data wouldn't be represented properly. :)
     
  8. KNau

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    Messages:
    1,165
    Likes Received:
    2
    I'd be wary about delving into data that's not necessarily of that much consequence - but you can't argue with a free trial :)

    http://www.eyetools.com/
     
    #8 KNau, Dec 4, 2006
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2006
  9. Indiepath

    Indiepath New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2004
    Messages:
    999
    Likes Received:
    0
    There are quite a few free scripts to do this also.
     
  10. LilGames

    LilGames New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Messages:
    421
    Likes Received:
    0
    VisitorVille is another neat website traffic visualizer, that should appeal to this crowd. It displays your pages as houses and skyscrapers. The taller the building, the more visits it represents. The lights on in the windows represents "actual" live traffic, and you can also see visitors move from page to page in little taxis, etc...
     

Share This Page

  • About Indie Gamer

    When the original Dexterity Forums closed in 2004, Indie Gamer was born and a diverse community has grown out of a passion for creating great games. Here you will find over 10 years of in-depth discussion on game design, the business of game development, and marketing/sales. Indie Gamer also provides a friendly place to meet up with other Developers, Artists, Composers and Writers.
  • Buy us a beer!

    Indie Gamer is delicately held together by a single poor bastard who thankfully gets help from various community volunteers. If you frequent this site or have found value in something you've learned here, help keep the site running by donating a few dollars (for beer of course)!

    Sure, I'll Buy You a Beer