car racing indie games - factors of success

Discussion in 'Game Design' started by clilian, Nov 10, 2005.

  1. Ronkes

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    - top view 2D or full 3D ?
    I wouldn't approach the problem from this angle. You're probably better of finding a good angle for your racing game, something unique, and then deciding whether your game idea works best in 2D or 3D.

    - mouse or keyboard ?
    If you're doing a 3D racing game, definitely keyboard. Using a mouse is just weird. With a 2D racing game I'd still think of keyboard first, but maybe you have some elements where a mouse could work. For example, if you mount weapons on the cars, you could use the mouse for aiming.

    - fun or serious ?
    That's a matter of taste, really. I don't now if there is a bigger market for one or the other. Just pick the one you like best and stick with it, because they require a completely different design approach.

    - team management or pure arcade style ?
    Again, a matter of taste. However, I think it's best to choose one and not go for a hybrid.

    - physics engine or simplified movements ?
    That depends on what type of game you decide to make. If it's 3D, people expect more realistic physics. If it's 2D, you can get away with simpler movement. This is probably not really an upfront decision, but something you arrive at by balancing the gameplay. You'll have to find what works best for your type of racing game.

    - simple gameplay / real simulation ?
    I'd go for simple gameplay. I think the fans of simulation racers are already well-served by the retail market. I suspect doing an accurate simulation is also much harder.

    - any other thoughts ?
    Yep. :) There are a lot of racing games out there and they cover quite a wide range. I think the best approach to finding a good design for a new racing game, is to play a few and look for one particular aspect that you like and then design your entire game around it. Really take it all the way. For example, Burnout is all about the crashes. Stunts (remember that one?) is all about stunt car driving. Carmageddon is all about gore and mayhem, etc. Or you could really change your thinking completely and do something like Mexican Motor Mafia.

    If you can find one such an angle to a racing game, you can make a really nice and unique game out of it. Personally, I'd go for a racing game with great tactics, because I know of no other racing game that took that approach (but I haven't played them all, of course).
     
  2. clilian

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    Thank you all for all this much interesting feedback !

    Lilian
     
  3. Ande

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    Since no one has mentioned my game, Turbo Sliders, I have to do that :). It has been a long-term hobby project for me and the original idea was to make a game like Slicks'n'Slide (which was a popular shareware game in Finland about 10 years ago) that works over network. The main emphasis has been to make a game I want to play, not something that might maximize the number of customers. I can't give you sales numbers and it is nothing compared to the big games in big portals but at least something - mainly in Europe and especially in Finland.

    Here are answers to some stuff you asked:

    * 2D

    * Keyboard controlled (or gamepad/joystick/wheel but I don't know if anyone uses that)

    * "Fun" as the basic controls are easy and physics are not very realistic but "Serious" in that it is very hard to be good and there are not arcade-style power-ups, rubberband algorithm or car tuning. And some people are very serious about the lap records :).

    * No team management (people have of course organized clans etc. though)

    * Simple physics. Most cars slide a lot (that's where the name comes from). Not a real simulation.
     
  4. stanchat

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  5. GhostRik

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    It's very simple to make 3D racing games in 3D Rad.

    www.3drad.com

    One of the demos and tutorials is a racing game, and most of the logic is built-in. Even in the free version.

    This is an end-of-life product and dubious for a commercial venture, but was always fun to play with.
     
  6. Greg Squire

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  7. DFG

    DFG
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    I was surprised at how poorly Realore's Tiny Cars did for me - http://www.realore.com/tinycars

    Maybe it was a lack of variety and not many incentives to win the races. I would think an RC ProAM clone would do well. Seems like that game was very popular on the NES. Maybe make it multiplayer over the net?
     
  8. Anlino

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    Ooops, sorry about that. I haven't heard about any racing games made with it, only the racing academy, so i though that it was what you meant.
     
  9. jasoniscool

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    i'm surprised no one here has mentioned trackmania sunrise

    it's such an awesomly fun game, including the multiplayer
     

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