Atlantis opens on BigFish

Discussion in 'Feedback Requests' started by Emmanuel, Jul 30, 2005.

  1. patrox

    Indie Author

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  2. Emmanuel

    Moderator Original Member

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    We're just out on MSN:
    MSN

    Zylom (as #1 download):
    Zylom

    and Wanadoo (French) in the top 5 through Zylom:
    Wanadoo

    #2 on RealArcade for another week..

    Best regards,
    Emmanuel
     
    #102 Emmanuel, Oct 7, 2005
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2005
  3. chanon

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    I'd say this is an EXTREMELY successful game!
    Congratulations!!
     
  4. Daniel

    Original Member

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    Totally amazing! Congrats, Emmanuel!

    I've been playing your game the last couple of days. Sure is an excellent game!

    I can't seem to find the logic behind the credit awards though, so why not ask the man himself... why do I get a credit sometimes when I score a combo, while other times not?
     
  5. Emmanuel

    Moderator Original Member

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    Daniel,

    Thanks! Did you check out BFG today? You're back as the featured game and we're holding the #2 and #3 spots :) Fabian is excited about the translations, too.

    As for the credits, you collect them by matching balls with a credit symbol on them (independently of making combos or not). Bonuses, though, are granted after a combo, if enough time has elapsed since the last bonus (so as to spread them out depending on the current difficulty level). Bonuses are broken down into "low" and "high" (according to how much destruction they cause). The low ones are frequent, the high ones a bit less, unless the player is in trouble, in which case the game will help out a bit.

    Best regards,
    Emmanuel
     
  6. Nexic

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    I now feel like a total idiot for predicting that it wouldn't sell massively well. Good job :)
     
  7. Emmanuel

    Moderator Original Member

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    Nexic, don't; you could very well have been right!

    Best regards,
    Emmanuel
     
  8. sparkyboy

    Original Member

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    Well there really is not much else to say is there my friend!!!!

    Absoulement incroyable!!!!!!!!

    My woman also much preferred it over LUXOR. She thought Luxor was too easy and your game was much more challenging and loved getting on the High score list.

    First time she did it she said ' Ha I beat him and I'm in 6th place, but how come only his name is there?'

    I explained that it was the programmer's name i.e. you, and she said she was going to wipe ALL your entries off the list!!! ;)


    Women eh :p


    Bien Jouer Mon ami


    Mark.
     
  9. Daniel

    Original Member

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    Emmanuel,

    Yes, I noticed!

    BTW. Thanks for the PM! ;)
     
  10. Anthony Flack

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    Hmm, apart from the fact that it seems that most people already are... well... a good question. Certainly a lot of people do seem to be raking in a lot of money for comparatively little work at the moment, it's a boomtime in indie land. "Making a Zuma", especially, seems like almost a license to print money.

    And yet I've never been more depressed about the state of this business, and never been more inclined to just give it up altogether. I've been slogging it out for years, with no reward, and I could have written a Zuma at any time, with my jolly graphics style that people seem to like, and probably made a lot of money I expect.

    But I won't.

    Not for respect at indiegamer (let's face it, people respect raw success far more than anything else around here). Not for respect from customers. Not even for respect from Bruce Willis.

    But just because, well I suppose I just don't see the point. Except for the money I guess. But you know, I find the world pretty damn sickening these days... it seems like everyone is doing everything purely for the money. Nobody is really following their heart any more. It's the reason damn near everything that used to mean something now sucks. The mainstream videogame industry sucks, as we know. And the downloadable games business is really starting to suck as well, for me at least. Everything that attracted me to the idea of "being indie" seems to be all but gone now. I feel like I just don't want to be a part of it.

    I know there are still people around trying to do their own thing, and some are even managing to make some sort of living off it. And I can get by without much money, same as I have done all my life, just so long as I feel like I'm making the most of myself. But it sure wears me down.

    I don't mean to criticise anybody here - eveyone has their own motivations for doing what they do - but reading about these success stories just reminds me of how worthless my own values are in our society. It doesn't make me feel good about myself at all. I'm looking for truth and beauty, but all I see are dollar signs in everyone's eyes.

    Ahh, time for bed I think. Congratulations, anyway!
     
  11. Nexic

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    To be perfectly honest I feel like that to an extent. When I made Xeno Assault I felt like a sell out because I was making yet another top down galaga clone. But Xeno Assault was the first game I made that sold decently.

    I then tried something a little different with Desperate Space, and its making more money than Xeno Assault, but I'm told time after time that if I had put the same level of polish into a game that was like Xeno Assault I would be making even more.

    So now I'm stuck in the situation where I now must settle for minor twists on basic shooter clones if I wan't to make money. I don't mind, I still enjoy the work, but its not what I orginally started at this to do. My hope is that a few more casual shooters down the line I can afford to make some more original games.
     
  12. tentons

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    @Anthony: Don't get too depressed. These forums are very casual game focused, but casual games are not the only market! We just need some good games to break those new markets open. :)
     
  13. jankoM

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    It's probably not smart of me to write this and poke the holy ones, but wth - I am nobody here anyway.

    The way I see it - it's more of a problem of **who** makes the money. Someone made 3 arkanoid games in a row and is succsessfull and its great, someone was making zuma/luxor clone and every wip pic he published we allmost fainted out of beauty, someone put his previous game under water and "it's even better" than the previous one.

    But when someone new like Emmanuel makes yet another zuma this is a direct ripoff to some, and we the others see that it looks good, but it feels it was made in two months, obviously lacks all that fine tuning and will only see it's 5 minutes on the portals.

    And now when he is very succsesfull, Emanuell is becoming one of the holy bunch but some of them seem a little disturbed. It may seem that my post was response to Antony, but it's not - only this is... well Funpause also made garden war, garden golf and rock'n roll (with phelios) and they don't seem portal clones to me at all, so if one of his games is paying off on the portals it doesn't mean his values are so diferent than yours.

    ----
    just a note... don't be offended by phrase the holy ones. I don't mean anything bad, just a figure of speech. In fact, I didn't want to offend anyone. In no way I speak in the name of Emmanuel, nor do I know him any better than you do.
     
  14. sparkyboy

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    Well FWIW, I'm into programming for the money, simple as that. Whether it be games or something else!! I allowed so many chances slip by me in the past 20 years or so, that no way am I gonna try something NEW!! (Can't afford to anyway. :D )

    At least this time, I have a very intelligent woman to bounce ideas off and already she has come up with something that WE BOTH AGREE, fits a certain criteria and audience perfectly!! I'm just formulating various designs in my head before I start prototyping. ;)

    As regards to Emmanuel, all I can say is 'good on him' for producing what seems to be a VERY SUCCESSFUL game indeed. I'm sure his twins will be very appreciative this Christmas, due to the fact that daddy wrote a 'CLONE'!

    As for the man himself, well, he has been nothing but HELPFUL towards me. When I requested certain info privately, he duly obliged!! :)

    Innovation and originality are certainly things I too want to aspire to, but unfortunately it does not seem, as yet, TO PAY THE BILLS!

    In the end I suppose you do what makes you happy, for whatever reason.


    Emmanuel, Je voudrais bien ecrire un jeu aussi bien que toi, et gagner un peu d'argent comme toi !! ;)

    All the best


    Mark.
     
  15. Anthony Flack

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    Please note that I wasn't suggesting anything about Emanuel, or his values. Or anyone else who makes any game of any sort. It was more just a sad commentary on "success".

    It's pretty clear that what I value has little value in the world, which just depresses me sometimes. Almost all the games that I consider to be amazing and beautiful faced a terrible struggle to be made, and almost all sold badly. But they are the reason I started doing all this in the first place, and I'm eternally grateful that they do exist. I still hope that one day I can make something that's worthy of a place among them. I'll end up working far too hard on it, and it probably won't make a heap of money. But somebody has to do it.
     
  16. svero

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Ola from arcadelab said to me that we're entertainers. Great entertainers entertain people and so to some extent we're no good if we're not giving people what they want. I believe there's a lot of truth in that. What's the value of a game that nobody or only a few people want to play? I guess there's always art for art's sake, but if I only did that I'd have to do it part time. I wouldn't be able to make a living out of it.
     
  17. Anthony Flack

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    Make a video of yourself falling off a roof then. Or write a song about farting. That'll entertain millions I'm sure.

    The thing is, who are "the people", and what is it that they want? When people talk about this, "the people" usually means "as many people as possible", and what they "want" is whatever is the easiest thing to give them that they'll buy in large numbers. I really don't think it has that much to do with entertaining people, or making people's lives better. If you really are concerned with entertaining people, you'll want to to give them something they can't get somewhere else. And you'll be concerned with not only entertaining as many people as possible, but you'll also want to try to get people to have as good a time as possible - not just the minimum it takes to get them to pay their $20.

    It's pretty clear that a lot of people want another Zuma game, but these people have already got lots of Zuma games. Making another one might get you some money, but it won't really make any difference to anybody.

    Without people making art for art's sake, I wouldn't want to make a living. I'm not sure I'd want to live at all. If you think about all the music, the books, the films, and everything else that you've enjoyed the most, chances are they weren't designed to sell as many copies as possible. You know what music that's designed to sell as many copies as possible sounds like. You know what a film that's designed to make as much money as possible looks like. It's pretty weak entertainment. Nobody's going to get passionate about that. It seems like there's not much passion for the work around here any more.
     
  18. soniCron

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    Enter the Modern Dark Ages...
     
  19. svero

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Well I don't think that making something entertaining necessarily means that it falls to the level of a game about farting. You can see that quite simply by making a bunch of crude games about farting that are not successful. To imply that to be successful means to do something stupid is... well.. a stupid argument.

    When you talk about making something for as many people as possible that includes the people who aren't amused by the most crude things. To my mind the best of anything usually works at both levels. At a superficial and a deeper level.

    I think there's an inherent bias against anything popular with certain people. It is popular therefor it is not worthy to be called art or it isn't good. It's a movie by who? Spielberg? Trash! There is always a brand of so called intellectual elitest with their heads so far up their asses they can't tell something good if they see it. And they dismiss it as soon as it's popular and not before. Popular doesnt equal crude, or without artistic merit as you imply. As well much of what we now consider classic was once "popular".

    So what then can we say about an obvious rip off or the same old thing hashed again that does catch on dispite offering relatively nothing new? I guess we could say the first people that did it, did it right and the new thing is riding on the coattails of it's predecessor, and perhaps even more popular for the fact that the original created an audience that didnt previously exist.

    And I think we can also say that the clone has merit on it's own. Why? Because for every 1 popular clone there are 20 that don't succeed. Maybe many more.
     
  20. Jack Norton

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    Well only because someone makes a clone and is successful, doesn't mean he wasn't enjoying his work and putting a lot of effort in it! Also, there are plenty of things in modern world (like music) that is just copying ideas around, but not only that, the new art I think is merging ideas together to create something fun...(IMHO).
    I don't make casual games, but after Atlantis success (I remember how all people here were skeptical the day of the launch, just check the old post) I believe that anyone here need to rethink their plans... you CAN make a clone of another successful game and get quite some money ;)
     

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