[ANN] New Flash game "MegaDrill", Screenshot and Trailer

Discussion in 'Announcements' started by kevintrepanier, Dec 7, 2009.

  1. kevintrepanier

    Original Member Indie Author

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    $15K with expenses. Development time was around 400 hours on a 6 months period. I'm not sure about "marketing time" though (making trailer, descriptions and icons for the game, e-mailing and negotiating with sponsors). That might have played around 50 hours on a 2 months period.

    I worked alone on the project except for the commissioned music. In the end, it made me a pretty good salary for the time invested. I consider it a success.

    As for successful Flash games, you might want to take a look at the numbers behind SteamBird. That's probably THE most talked about Flash game in the business at the moment.
     
  2. Colm

    Colm New Member

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    Cheers for sharing Kevin, interesting stuff.
     
  3. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Very useful info, thanks. And congrats on making some proper money out of the short dev cycle.

    The biggest thing I actually took away from that writeup is how laughable mochi really is now. Is there really any point to them existing at all?
     
  4. kevintrepanier

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    @Applewood : How did you get that impression about mochi, I'm curious? I didn't even mentioned them.

    To answer your question : Mochi is mostly used for their live version control system. Distribution of Flash games being viral, it's quite nice to be able to fix bugs and send new versions to the hundreds of portals hosting the game. But new version control systems are emerging so maybe Mochi will not be of use anymore in the future.
     
  5. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Oops, sorry - For that comment I was actually referring to the link you posted. He made about 40 grand in total and 10 bucks of it came from Mochi ads.
     
  6. andrew

    andrew New Member

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    Mochi ... uh... yeah.

    Days active / Game / Impressions / Skips / eCPM / Total revenue

    577 Armor Wars 1,033,760 / 39,230 $0.30 $305.58
    697 Mytheria 1,388,952 / 140,231 $0.40 $550.90

    2.3 million plays in their system gets you a whopping $850...

    - andrew
     
  7. AlexWeldon

    AlexWeldon New Member

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    CPMStar's a lot better than Mochi, but they still suck. I'd gladly do without them... unfortunately, however, because they also give the sponsor a cut, most sponsors (at least the small-time ones I get) insist on CPMStar for the viral version.
     
  8. kevintrepanier

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    Actually $0.30 - $0.40 eCPM is not all that bad. I get an average of $0.50 eCPM with CPMStar on MegaDrill and Finding my Heart. I got nearly $2500 in ad revenue for those two games this year.

    Advertisement is far from being the main revenue source in this model but it's a non negligible aside. I mostly hope that in the long term I'll be able to build a source of passive income with multiple games with Advertisements.

    I like CPMStar because it is not as intrusive as Mochi. Devs also have more freedom as to how to implement it (it's just an ad box you can put wherever you want). Mochi is a wrapper so you are kind of stuck with how it's made.
     
  9. andrew

    andrew New Member

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    CPMStar is definitely better. But still, it's a small amount compared to what you'll usually get from sponsorships. However, you're right, if you have enough of a portfolio of games, you could amass a reasonable income stream...

    - andrew
     
  10. Jack Norton

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    I assume the ads money doesn't fall off after 1-2 years then? In my case (even with not very popular games) I noticed that...
     
  11. kevintrepanier

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    Finding my Heart is a little over a year old and MegaDrill is about 8 months old. Both have reached a seemingly stable monthly revenue. They both get somewhere between $30 to $80 monthly with CPMStar. We'll see how long they can sustain that.

    How old are your games Jack?
     
  12. Jack Norton

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    Well some were of spring/summer 2009 and another may this year but after reading the number of views they're quite far from yours so... :)
     
  13. Escapee

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  14. electronicStar

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    Mochi is not so bad. CPMStar is better money wise but impossible to get into the program without being sponsored or having a website with a huge traffic.

    Mochi has a large network, very reliable services and very accessible. They also have a good microtransaction service which, despite a few controversies, seems to work rather well for a couple devellopers.

    But yeah, their advetisement money is just peanuts. Even kongregate pays better.
     

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