ANN: Kasual Kit

Discussion in 'Feedback Requests' started by NUView, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. Nexic

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    But you would basically be trying to sell it to people who don't even know they want to make games. So you've go to:

    1. Convince them they want to make games
    2. Convince them they can easily do it, no programming needed
    3. Convince them to buy it.

    With people who are already looking into making these games for profit you only have to do the 3rd step in terms of marketing. They already know they want to make games, they will probably feel like they can do it as most people getting to that 'stage' have some game creation experience. Plus they will have a huge financial incentive. As I've said, a low price point like you are suggesting would mean they need to reach 20 times as many people to make the same kind of money... That means they will have much harder time getting a good ROI for paid adverts.

    And how exactly is he going to reach these casual gamers on a decent scale? He certainly can't sell this software on the portals or other 'casual' hang outs. Developers on the other hand are right on his doorstep. I'm sure just from seeing this one post there are already several members here would be very interested in using this.

    And guys, we know the mainstay casual audience barely knows how to right click, so even if it's MEGA MEGA easy use, do you think REALLY they would be interested?
     
  2. Savant

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    BMC

    Which is why in my first post on this sub thread I said $29.95

    Nexic

    How many people are making levels for Big Kahuna Reef? There is a core audience of tinkerers who like this sort of thing.

    You don't have to sell it to everybody. You only have to sell enough to make a profit.
     
  3. Nexic

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    I reckon even at $500 just from these forums he will get AT LEAST 10 sales of this (assuming it's any good, I don't know yet). In order to get that return with your idea hes got to make 200 sales, which we all know without portals isn't easy. And getting those 200 will be made even harder when he starts trying to advertise a game-making product to non game-makers. His ad's would have terrible CTRs.
     
  4. Savant

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    Well, hell, he should just charge $100,000 and be done with it then. :)
     
  5. Sirrus

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    I think everyone is focusing too much on the 'out of the box' end product.

    It would be ridiculous to assume that more than one or two developers could release a same genre game with the kit and get portals to agree.

    The real advantage here is the code base it generates. Having a base to expand to make a truly unique game is not such a bad thing. Who knows though?

    When the portals stop taking clones, we will stop making them. Pretty simple. So instead of arguing about the down fall - do something about it. Portals need encouragement, and more importantly, highly polished games that bring something a bit different.
     
  6. Nexic

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    But no one would pay 100,000 if they weren't going to make it back. And not many people can even get 100k in the first place.

    $500 works because people can still afford it and at the same time they know that they can make more than that figure back. You can't say a lower price will always work, and also can't say that a higher price will always work. What DOES work, is pricing the product correctly for the market. Developers are prepared to pay $100s for good tools.
     
    #86 Nexic, Mar 15, 2006
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2006
  7. Raptisoft

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    And furthermore, the earth is flat.
     
  8. Sirrus

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    ...Touché...
     
  9. Bmc

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    #89 Bmc, Mar 15, 2006
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2006
  10. Midnight Synergy

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    I'm still not sure if this is a joke or not, but the first thing that came to my mind (similar to what Chris mentioned earlier) is that this would be a neat way to do bonus games for your product line.

    In my case, for example, a Stinky & Loof Match-3. I doubt I'd charge for it, but it could be used e.g. for a newsletter sign-up incentive, or just to keep content fresh on your site while developing a long-term project.

    $500 might not be worth it, but at $100 for a "freeware licence" I'd seriously consider it.
     
  11. Adrian Cummings

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    A good idea and maybe it just might work - certainly opens it up wide for newbies and suchlike which can't be a bad thing in terms of progress etc.

    Will it work as a viable business model? - actually I reckon it kinda could that's the scary thing for some on here heh ;)

    Cheers,
     
  12. dxgame

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    "I'm not saying I'm planning to do this, but I think that's where the real potential is for this product. You can use it as content filler on your site between your major releases. Assuming your customers dig these kind of games."

    Exactly, this is not a tool to submit products to portals. Instead of affiliating with a match 3 game and getting 10-30%, you can invest $500.00 and get your own branded version (with your own media) and sell it on your website and get 100% of the profits.
     
  13. Escotia

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    Yeah. If it can't clone Chuzzle perfectly I don't want it.
     
  14. Phil Steinmeyer

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    Well, let's get the numbers straight first.

    Pretty much any reasonable affiliate deal will get you 30% (10%? No...)

    You'll only get about 90% from selling your own.

    Big difference still (3-fold), BUT, is this wizard and it's canned graphics gonna crank out a Match-3 that converts as well as Bejewelled, JewelQuest, or Big Kahuna Reef? I really doubt it.
     
  15. U-Brothers

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    kasualkit is Nothing but total disparagement of indie games, developers, quality graphics and overall game content and ideas too..:mad:

    no more comment guys - this is just an example of another wrong path for indie games..
     
  16. Arthur[VD]

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    I think- what if someone will make and publish another CloneKit before this guys and will sell it twice or three times cheaper :D
    Then whey will feel on their own skin what is clones.;)
     
  17. Nikster

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    cloning a clone cloner ? my head is hurting. :)
     
  18. bob123

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    Announcment: Tommorow releasing "Make your own Kasual Kit"! :eek:
     
  19. Anlino

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    Uhmmm... Kasual kit kit?
     
  20. whisperstorm

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    Since I try to look at the positive side of things, I wonder why so many folks bag on this tool. Imagine being able to create a prototype of a game quickly to show to your prospective clients, or to create something fun for just you and a few friends. Commoditizing the match-3 games seems like a good thing in that folks who crave these games will have tons to choose from, and folks who design games can now focus more energy on more innovative games. Your client wants a new match - 3? Bang it out in a week and spend the rest of that time working on your new casual RPG.

    I think that the folks who hate this feel like it's making little of their hard work and effort up to now. I think they feel that this trivializes the effort it takes to make a great game and turns it into a "game grinder".

    However I dont think that's the case. It seems to be - at least from the description - a way to jump past all the routine coding you normally have to do, which might take weeks or months and discourage you from ever finishing a game. Once you have that, then you can go and build on top of that. Sure there will be tons of crappy knockoffs or just endless clones. That's what happens in places like Gamemaker.nl or KlickTeam, or Blitz.

    My guess is this is going to come out, some folks will bag on it, others will genuinely try it out and dismiss it, and perhaps someone will take it at face value, create a few games, and get inspired to create something better than a match - 3.

    To me it seems like a way to save time, experiment with ideas, and help move the genre forward with folks thinking of something new that this "doesnt do".
     

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