ANN: Kasual Kit

Discussion in 'Feedback Requests' started by NUView, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. Sakura Games

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    I think that in the casual market now production value means more than any programming skills. Don't know about this kit, but if you had the same engine of Zuma or others, you would just need to hire some cheap asian artist and "re-skin it".
    It would already sell I bet :D
     
  2. jankoM

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    (for the record) I doubdt it too. Maybe it can make a game just like zuma, but the "after-zumas" that have a chance of becoming new hits have to bring at least some feeling of "something special and better and different" IMO.
     
  3. Grey Alien

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    Man, this is so obviously just a joke. You don't all really think this is real do you? It's quite a funny joke, but they'll never finish the other pages on the website.
     
  4. Nexic

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    I can't see any reason why this is a joke, it wouldn't exactly be hard to make something like this... I think you are just being optimistic.
     
  5. lakibuk

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    Not hard to make? They need to make Zuma, Chuzzle, Bejeweled ... That's a huge effort. Next they need to make these 5 games generic so that they can be adapted by the customers = next huge effort. This would be such a big work that they could easily make some portal hits themselves and retire. My assumption: The generated clones will be of low quality.
     
  6. Mr.Blaub

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    I can just imagine buying the program and sending the portals about 5 games that were exactly the same, except they had some ludicrously minor graphical adjustments. Sure, they probably wouldn't even humour me, but on my end I'd be laughing at them whatever their response.
     
  7. Nexic

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    Well when I say not that hard to make I didn't mean it would be mega easy, I just meant it wouldn't be anywhere near as hard as a full scale game dev utility like Blitz or GameMaker. As for them making the games and earning loads of money - it isn't that easy, there are tons of match-3s coming out every week and barely any become big hits. I actually think this software at that price will be much more lucrative than making games overall.
     
  8. Glen Pawley

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    Kasual Kit -like products are simply not sustainable. Even if it initially sells, it is going to crash the market of every game type that it supports. Pretty soon it's buyers will dry up and NUView wouldn't be able to afford adding new game types to it's list of clones. It's the economic equivalent of pissing in and poisoning the trough you're eating from. Sure it'll have some initial sales to gullible idiots, but that won't last forever.

    Their marketing approach is similar to a pyramid scheme. If the market for game type X supports 10 variants and can generate $1000 each, i can make more money if i sell the game code and the variant artwork to 30 suckers for $500 each.

    Assuming this is real then, the only people it's going to hurt are the developers that are producing clones anyway, which most of us would agree is not a particularly bad thing.

    As for copying a game idea and adding it to the kit, as I said, NUView won't be able to sustain the effort to add your game type to it's stable for long.
     
  9. Chris Evans

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    I find this pretty amusing myself. Weren't a couple of people here about a month ago joking that they were going to create a Zuma-template and give it away for free? Then actually it turns out someone was already planning to do that (minus the free part).

    I don't see how this product could really bother anyone except if they are planning to make a clone or possibly worried about being cloned. And really it's only the top 1% like PopCap who are capable of making original casual games that have to be worried about being cloned.

    Besides, if you're really worried about clones flooding the market (even more so than now), then why not talk to your portal reps and try to persuade them to not accept cheap knock-offs of your games? After all, they're the gatekeepers with casual games, so if they don't accept clones, then it won't be an issue. Tell them to wait for you to release a sequel in a few months time or whatever.

    I guess my point is there's two sides to this. Kasual Kit games will only become a problem if the portals let it. So if this is an issue that really bothers you then why not put a little pressure on your distribution partners. If you make original casual games, I'm sure you'll have some clout. It will make the Kasual Kit a non-issue.

    With THAT said, Kasual Kit could be useful for re-branding popular games for your own site. For example, I could make Pow Pow skin of Zuma with all our characters and sell it strictly on my site as a novelty game of sorts. I wouldn't bother submitting it to portals, I'd keep it exclusive to my site. Who knows, it might generate a few extra direct sales a month.

    I'm not saying I'm planning to do this, but I think that's where the real potential is for this product. You can use it as content filler on your site between your major releases. Assuming your customers dig these kind of games. It's basically like a cheap Flash web game of sorts...
     
  10. Fost

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    Hey NuView that's a cool product. I wonder if it might be worth you also marketing it to end users rather than just developers? After all, there's more of them by far, and, judging by some of the replies on this forum, they aren't likely to whine about the fact that you've made creating games easier for people. We get loads of people on our forums who are interested in making games themselves, but don't have the programming skills.

    Well done - it's a cool idea. I just hope you can someday add a template for 'Mr. Robot' type games and make my life a hell of a lot easier ;)
     
  11. Michael Flad

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    This will neither kill the market nor create a flood of bad clones on portals. "Developers" not able to create great gameplay/artwork/sound/music won't be able to do so with tools like that, and the others were able to create good games easily in the past.
    Using something like Kasual Kit, given a dev didn't do anything related to one of the gametypes, he may save 2 weeks of startup work ... and have to pay with a codebase probably not written the way he works best with (which may cost those 2 weeks later on during development).
    Those devs not able to code such simple stuff like the basics of a match3, Zuma etc. aren't those creating the good clones anyway.
     
  12. sparkyboy

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    As has been discussed much in the past, the reason that 'Match 3' games are doing so well is simple. The Portals play it safe and tell people what they should like and buy.
    It really is quite straight forward, if the portals just supply cutesy, 1 button controlled match 3 look-alikes, people become accustomed and conditioned to these games, that's not to say they wouldn't like something a little different.
    You need to remember that people are inevitably 'SHEEP', and most need telling what they like ( that's what advertising and marketing is all about anyway).

    I mean if you offer a starving man bread, when there's Roast Chicken around the corner, he'll continue to eat only the bread until he gets offered the chicken!;)


    All the best


    Mark
     
  13. Grey Alien

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    Don't forget that LOTS of people DO find match-3s great fun to play and seek out more or the same cos they like it. A bit like me and FPS games or RPG games. As long as people still buy them, people will make them, until the market becomes too flooded to make it worthwhile, which may not be very far away. However, people may still make them as "practice pieces" like Tetris. However, speaking from experience, match-3s still take a lot of programming and testing.
     
  14. Savant

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    I think there was an interesting point raised above. This should really be marketed at end users, not developers. Make the interface as simple as possible and let people create their own match-3 games to play at home. They wouldn't have to be the greatest things ever but for $29.95 they could buy your kit and make enough simple games that it would be well worth the money for them.
     
  15. Nexic

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    I really don't think that would work, many would simply dismiss the idea of creating their own game as they think they don't have the time or arent skilled enough, and no amount of saying 'this is real easy to use' will convince them of that. At a low price of $30 you need to sell almost 20 copies in order to make up a single $500 developer copy.

    The best way to sell people things is convince them that they will make even more money by using it. You can't convince the end user of that.
     
  16. luggage

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    You could maybe convince them they will save money by not having to purchase other portal games though.
     
  17. Nexic

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    You are right if the games could be made in a few minutes and still be as good as the proper games, with each one having enough variety... Which just isn't gonna happen unless the end-user can create an entire set of art for the game instantly.
     
  18. Savant

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    He's including a bunch of artwork so that's sort of moot.

    If he includes 3-4 sample games that the user can play right away then, at the very least, he's sold them a 4 pack of games. The user can then choose to make their own or tweak the existing ones if they want more.

    I think it's a great idea.
     
  19. luggage

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    The games don't have to be as good as "proper" ones though - they just have to be good enough.

    And if the site is correct and there's several themes the user can choose between then I don't see why this couldn't be aimed at the end user. Imagine it being like a game with lots of game modes and skins...
     
  20. Bmc

    Bmc New Member

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    good luck getting the end user to pay $500 for a program to make their own games

    they can buy discs with 500 games (of the same quality) for under $10 at any Walmart
     

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