Android Will Die in Two Years

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by HarryBalls, Jan 10, 2012.

  1. Scharlo

    Original Member

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    Fling A Thing is our 2nd game that made more money on Android than on iOS. Game has been featured both by Apple and Google but somehow it gained much more traction on Android. As mentioned before in this thread it takes much more work to get the game 'properly' released on Android (too many devices and markets) but there are also many more opportunities on Android market in terms of monetization. So far we are using IAP through Google checkout, incentivised installs, banner ads and full screen ads. On the top of that we had some pre-load deals with carriers/manufacturers. Most of this things won't work on iOS. Anyone interested in co-publishing deals on Android market, send me a PM.
     
  2. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    That matches my experience also. Our second app is free with ads and that's doing two orders of magnitude better on Andrdoid too. Shit, everything works better on Android. (Apart from JNI, Sound, and 3D :) )
     
  3. TylerBetable

    TylerBetable New Member

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    @Greg Squire: It should be the same code, just submitted to different gatekeepers. At least that's been my experience with carrier app stores (Verizon App Store, etc) and 3rd party portals (Getjar, etc).

    I do think Android is getting better at solving a lot of its issues and that makes the ecosystem better for developers. Google Checkout is becoming the de-facto IAP provider and that will help monetization tremendously. Hardware and software problems are starting to lessen as the compatibility issues between 2.2 and 2.3 don't come close to the differences between 2.2 and 1.6, for instance. As the Android ecosystem becomes a bit less like the "wild west", it will become an increasingly better place to do business, and that's a win win for developers and players
     
  4. Greg Squire

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    Thanks. That's good to hear that you don't have to have different codebases or versions between the appstores.
     
  5. SkySonata

    SkySonata New Member

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    Android isn't the best platform since sliced bread but compared to a 30% charge it is heaven.
     
  6. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Google take 30% from Android Market?
     
  7. electronicStar

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    nothing prevents you from selling your apk direct on your website
     
  8. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    True. You try doing that, I'll go with the AppStore option...
     
  9. Gary Preston

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    I hope Android remains a competitor to iOS for some time to come, if for no other reason than choice of store. Whilst using the android app store and losing 30% will for most provide the best return, at least there's a way for those rejected from the store to still sell/market their apps.

    That said, I'm still not sold on the idea of porting to Android at the moment, the wide range of hardware is off putting to say the least. Still, more likely than a wp7 port, even though I've got a wp7 :)
     
  10. Greg Squire

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    I read SkySonata's comment as a comparison to iOS. In other words "compared to the 30% that Apple charges, Android is heaven".

    That 30% cut to Apple is widely known (http://developer.apple.com/programs/ios/distribute.html). However that got me curious about the cut that Google takes, and I found that it is also 30%. (see http://support.google.com/androidma....py?hl=en&answer=112622&topic=15867&ctx=topic). Looks like they both take 30%.

    My impression was that Google took a smaller cut than Apple. Did this change at some point? Did Google just decide that if Apple can can charge that, then why can't they?
     
    #30 Greg Squire, Jan 19, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2012
  11. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    30% seems to be the industry standard ime. Which I think it's perfectly fair tbh - It's their bat and their ball and I fear the day they wise up and increase their cut.
     
  12. ManuelMarino

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    It's impossible Android can disappear, it will evolve, change, be different, but not disappear. It's one of the most important technologies of these years, how can you imagine it will disappear in few years?
     
  13. Nutter2000

    Original Member Indie Author

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    This is technology we're talking about! Never Say Never! (again) ;)
     
  14. jcottier

    jcottier New Member

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    The best % I ever got from a casual portal was 40% in my pocket. 70% is a really good %, no doubts about that.

    JC
     

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