an interesting discussion on a warez site:

Discussion in 'Development & Distribution' started by cliffski, Jul 2, 2007.

  1. cliffski

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    total bullshit. And if you really believed this was true, you would make your game donationware.

    thankfully a huge chunk of the market don't know how to get pirated games. The moment you make it easy for them, a lot of them pirate them.
    Feel free to switch to a donation model, and in fact, to actually distribute torrents and hacks of your game. I will also make a note not to report your game if I see it cracked anywhere, as I did not realise this was what you wanted.
     
  2. Tom Gilleland

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    All my games that have been put on the portals have been cracked because the portals use the same DRM tools. A cracker just needs to hack the tool once and it works for all the games. I'm sure you guys already know this. But no one has cracked any of my games that have my own custom DRM that I wrote. I put this on all the games directly on my site. And it is really a pretty simple DRM, but it's not worth it for the strong hackers to work on cracking a few games, when they can do it once for thousands of games.

    -Tom
     
  3. Bad Sector

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    How did you came to this conclusion? Making donationware is a totally different thing than making a DRM-free game.
     
  4. cliffski

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    its one thing not to use DRM, but to make stupid claims like "the industry only exists because of teh pirates" is just laughable.
     
  5. Jack Norton

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    I've posted that 100 times but I'll repeat it once again. I made a serious A-B test, not pure talking.

    Game: The Goalkeeper.
    After I put armadillo protection= 30% sales increase.

    Sure, it's just a coincidence, and I could put no DRM on my games and they would still sell!
     
  6. arcadetown

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    If Real's DRM is easy to break and Real generates the biggest sales by far out there, doesn't it show that cracks really don't affect sales? Pirates suck and will never pay for anything.

    Within days of us sending a PR announcement about upcoming Realspace 3 there were several cracks. Lesson: pirates listen to PR wires. Do they suck? Yes! Will they affect our sales? Highly doubtful.
     
  7. Sol_HSA

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    One of the reasons why I don't grab pirated copies of games is that it's easier to get the legal copies. However, I've still had to get cracks for some games that I've bought (from brick-and-mortar stores) since the DRM is stopping me from playing my legal copy..

    On the indie/casual side, the easier-to-buy-than-steal is still true, although I'm avoiding bigfish actively since they're really pushing it - a few more automatically registering mailing lists there and I think it will feel safer to search for a pirated copy than to give them any personal information, thank you..
     
  8. MikeVitt

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    Do those of you using a DRM "lock" it to a computer (or a few) via a server check? I'm wondering if customers are ok with it.

    The reason I ask is that I don't understand why the DRM actually protects your game unless you use the above method. Someone could buy a legitimate copy and just include the registration with the full version. Of course, this assumes you have a separate demo and full version. Even still, the same thing could happen to your combined version.
     
  9. cliffski

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    Theres also the anonymity issue. Yes, someone could just publish their reg code. I don't use reg codes any more, but if I did, and found that someone had shared the code on a warez site, would I do anything about it?

    You bet I would. I'd go out of my way to prosecute them and make an example of them. Whether or not you think thats sensible, the fact that people like me exist who *will* do that, means people are much less likely to take the risk.

    Also, I'm not convinced that real or any other single portal makes enough sales to compensate for effectively making a freeware copy of my games available. Democracy sells very very well, years after release. I expect all my games to have at least a 4 year lifetime. Given that, someone needs to shift TONS of copies at a decent royalty, to compensate for me having a trivially cracked copy of it in the wild.
     
  10. MikeVitt

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    I guess my concern would be that a registration code could be purchased in a way that is hard to trace. Perhaps it could be bought from someone living in a country where it would be hard to take legal action.
     
  11. cliffski

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    Perhaps, but most such places find it difficult to buy games online anyway. Besides, if such measures only dissuade the 90% of your customers who are from europe or the US, then its still a good thing. it HAS to be bad if some soccer mom thinks she can blatantly upload the game to a warez site after purchase and there is no comeback.
     
  12. Spore Man

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    That's assuming those people will even hear about you having done this. You'd have to convince the press to carry your story, and it would have to be carried and publicized in places where your typical customer would see and hear about it (ie: not your standard game news site). I doubt big news outlets would care about some small game developer suing a pirate. They hardly care about the big game industry companies as it is. Then again if you make enough of a stink about it.....
     
  13. cliffski

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    nah, forget the press, warez sites talk about such things. and if they didn't, a few false accounts linking to information on it can ensure they start.
     
  14. Desktop Gaming

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Your first post in this thread interests me - those guys really wait for games to come onto Reflexive because its that easy to get cracks for their games??

    All the affiliate titles on my site are from Reflexive for consistency with screenshots, presentation and copy. My conversion rate is only 0.4% which I consider very low - I'd expect 1-2%. But if people are downloading games then getting cracks for them instead of buying.... that'd kinda make sense.
     
  15. Roman Budzowski

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    Why not fake the whole thing? Not only accounts, but also the story. There's no way they can check it out...

    best
    Roman
     
  16. cliffski

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    more chit chat:

    PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 12:27 pm

    "well kudos1 and democracy both from positech came out on reflexive.
    so it isn't stupid to think that rok legend will do the same"


    THINK AGAIN LITTLE BOY. :D

    Nice to see they know I made the game, a small one-man developer, but are still happy to steal it.
     
  17. Addictive 247

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    Isn't it nice to see that they know who the developer is. Shame they have no intention of supporting you and just want to rip your games.

    Please PM me the link to the forum. It will be an interesting one to watch and hopefully I can get involved with some mischevious behaviour ;)
     
  18. Sol_HSA

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    I doubt they even know it's a one-man company they're ripping. That would require going to your site and be interested enough to read the about-page.

    On the other hand, I doubt they'd care even if they knew.
     
  19. cliffski

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    check this out. apparently, according to the 'pirate party' if you try to remove the anonymity of peoples sharing copyrighted torrents, you are helping child abuse. No I am not kidding:

    http://www.thelocal.se/7835/

    He claims that removing anonymity will lead to the development of more anonymous services which will help out paedophiles. So in effect, he is saying "anonymity will help out paedophiles, so as a result, please ...errr..... do not remove our anonymity."

    Amazing.
     
  20. GBGames

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    I mentioned this on your blog, but what he is saying isn't much worse than what the MPAA is saying. Did you know that pirating movies hurts farmers?

    Someone's account of the MPAA's propoganda and how it hurts him as an artist: http://www.free-conversant.com/thom/main/2004/11/10

    I'm just pointing out that the absurdity isn't one-sided here.
     
    #40 GBGames, Jul 10, 2007
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2007

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